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Pollo Rancheria

By CPSLIM, Jul 6, 2015 | Updated: Jul 13, 2015 | | |
  1. CPSLIM
    Pollo Rancheria.jpg [​IMG]


    I first got the idea to own chickens from a couple friends of mine, Matt and Bill, who had some. I hadn't done too much research but found a place nearby that was selling baby chics and I went out and got some.
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    I got one of each breed the store was selling, a barred rock, golden sex link, rhode island red and a brown leghorn.

    The brooder had already been set up using an old fish tank I had in the attic. Once the the little gals were settled in I started to work building the coop. Basically everything i found out about building a coop I learned on the internet. I poured a 12" deep concrete foundation for the coop to keep out racoons. I live near a creek and they are a big problem in my neighborhood. In hindsight it would have been easier and cheaper to have buried hardware cloth underneath the coop instead of the concrete, but at least this way I know my coop is anchored into the ground and isn't going anywhere.


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    The measurements for the coop are 6' by 5' and the run is 6' by 12'. I anchored stained redwood down on the concrete foundation and used that to attach all the 2x4 beams.

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    The goal was too use as much recycled material as I could for this thing... but it ended up being so much easier to get the stuff I needed at home depot rather then scavenge craigslist for free lumber!
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    This guy proved to be little help holding things, so I purchased some grips too.
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    The window was actually 'recycled'! Its good the gals get some light. I mounted it where the inside of the planned run is going, so I can leave it open most of the time for ventilation and not worry about other critters getting into the coop.


    I painted the bottom of the coop with primer to protect the wood.
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    There's a pullie system to open and shut the door into the coop. Since the coop and run are both enlcosed I just end up leaving the door open 24/7. It's nice to be able to close the birds in one section or the other when I'm cleaning though.


    I also ended up getting linoleum to ease the cleaning process.

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    After the other 4 were about a month old I went and got 2 Americaunas, I really wanted some blue and yellow eggs.
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    BAWK BAWK BECKS!
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    Those 2 got big quick!
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    Electra Chicken and Dyna Hen. Oh, my friend Kate too.

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    Flo, Coffy and Foxy
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    And up goes the roof!

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    My friend Debbie helped me pick out the chics and also with building the coop.

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    I used PVC pipe and poultry nipples so I could feed the birds without having to go into the coop and run all the time.


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    And the finished product! It took about 200 man hours and over $1000 but it was a fun project and its a
    focal point of my backyard now.
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    The finished product!
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Comments

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  1. CPSLIM
    Thanks! Good luck with your coop!
  2. larissap112
    Wow, both your coop building and your amusing writing skills are awesome! I hope our coop is half as nice as yours when we complete it.

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