Raising Cornish X for Meat – The TRUTH

By aoxa, Oct 8, 2013 | Updated: Apr 17, 2014 | | |
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  1. aoxa
    If you do not want to read about chickens used for meat, you may want to skip over this post. We are omnivores here.. so we eat meat, and enjoy eating meat. If I am going to eat it, I am going to raise it if possible, and know that what is on my plate has had a wonderful life full of adventures and fresh air. I will not send my birds to the butcher either. I want them to spend their very best and the one bad moment here at our farm. It is less stress on the birds in the end, and those are my feelings on the subject.
    So please, if you are vegan or vegetarian move along.. Don’t read this.. Unless you are looking for proof that chickens for meat can be raised humanely. They also can be killed humanely – and that to me is of the very highest importance. We are thankful for every bite of chicken we take. We know that the animal did not live in vain. They were raised with love and care and strict attention to detail in their management.
    I feel a very strong urge to advocate for all the abundant misinformation about the common broiler chickens and their apparent disturbing behaviour everyone seems to go on about.
    Here are some of the many labels I often see associated with the CX:


    • Disgusting
    • Ugly
    • Smelly
    • Lazy
    • Can’t walk (leg issues)
    • Won’t forage..
    • Lays in their own filth
    • Organ failure – heart attacks common
    • Stupid
    • Tasty (*this one is true*)
    What you don’t know is that all of this has to do with improper management! If your CX are disgusting, smelly, lazy, spending much of the day sleeping in their own filth before dying of heart failure, it is YOUR improper husbandry that is the issue, not the Cornish X! if you don’t know any better on how to raise them, I can’t really blame you. The feeding guides shown online make my jaw drop. No wonder your birds are laying around, pooping every 5 seconds and sleeping in it. It’s not your fault. The instructions on raising the CX have mislead you. All the falsity is overwhelming. Threads on backyard chickens with the titles like: Cornish X’s = Nastiest birds EVER, does not help their case any either.
    Last year I had written off the CX as a Frankenchicken based on all the info I read about online. I was dead-set against raising them on my free range only farm. I didn’t want to have birds penned up for their entire life.. I heard that they can’t/won’t free range… I put my foot down… Until I saw one video that made me second guess everything I’ve read about prior. Maybe they can free range and be chickens after all? I might as well give it a shot.. If they don’t pan out, I can at least say I tried, right?
    This is MY experience with the broiler better known as the Cornish X, CX or Meat Kings.
    This is a week-by-week summary. You can read in more detail here.

    [​IMG]
    Week One and Two (Days 1 – 13)
    I had a rough time with them from day 1 to 14 It was extremely humid and incredibly hot.. we had a run in with Cocci and lost 7 CX and 10 RSL chicks. We did not treat for cocci, but offered electrolytes (Stress Aid) the day after we noticed low movement and puffiness despite the heat. They went quickly. Here you can not get Amprol without a vet’s prescription. It took me 48 hours to get my hands on some, and by that time the electrolytes really perked them up. The strong survived. After they were on grass, the birds were golden. No more illness (save one) who I moved back in and gave amprol (the only one that was ever dosed). Chick was fine within 2 days and back out with everyone.
    [​IMG]

    Two Weeks (Day 14-20)
    I opened the pop door. I continued to offer electrolyte water because of the heat being so stressful on the chicks. I found the first week they really didn’t go very far. They could not understand the concept of going BACK INSIDE at night. I had to pick each chick up and place inside the pop door (this includes the red sex link chicks).
    [​IMG]

    Three Weeks (Day 21-27)
    Finally the CX are spreading out and returning to the pen at night on their own. Real feathers coming in. They are a good 3 times the size of their hatch mates (the red sex link layers).
    [​IMG]

    Four Weeks (day 28-34)
    Really good at foraging now. They run as soon as they hear the back screen door slam shut. They want treats. They are getting closer and closer to my neighbour’s property line.
    [​IMG]

    Five Weeks(day 34-40)
    Almost 100% feathered out. They are passing our property lines and ranging two acres now. I do not like to watch them eat. They inhale food. I do love watching them forage, and they are very active. As soon as the pop door is open they are off..
    [​IMG]

    Six weeks (day 40-46)
    Not much change since week five for experience. They have grown some. They are ranging exceptionally well. No leg injuries save one I jammed in the sliding door of the barn. She will be the first processed. Haven’t lost a single one since cocci outbreak.

    See video proof of my CX birds free ranging @ 6 weeks (with other heritage birds.. and goats.. and rabbits). Many of them run like Phoebe on Friends [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Seven weeks (day 47-53)
    I processed the girl with the injured leg. She was limping, but still got around. I didn’t want it to get any worse so she was processed along with three others. They were too small at this age. Roughly 3 pounds. We were going to do ten, but after seeing the first four gutted and weighed, we decided against it.
    [​IMG]

    Eight weeks (day 54 – 60)
    This is when most would start processing the CX. I figured they are still getting around very well, so I’ll give them a little longer.. May do the boys at 9 weeks..
    [​IMG]
    Nine Weeks (day 61-67)
    They were hogging all the food at feeding time from EVERYONE, so we processed the largest 10 boys at 9 weeks old. Averaged out about 4.5 pounds. Largest was 5 pounds, smallest was just under 4. Much more breast meat seen than at 7 weeks.
    [​IMG]

    10-11 Weeks (day 68-81)
    picture is at almost 11 weeks – I have 28 left to process. 4 are boys, 24 girls. Two of the girls look very small. I think I may keep them to laying age. A strict feeding regime is important to do this.. I want to see what they will give out when bred to a Heritage Plymouth Rock. I know they don’t breed true.

    At 12 weeks of age (88 days old) we processed 26 chickens. 22 pullets and 4 cockerels. You can see them in this video at that age. They were still extremely active and a good size. After they were processed (neck, feet and wing tips off) they averaged 5.5 pounds each. Smallest over 5 pounds, largest over 6. One chicken can feed 8 no problem (unless you are feeding teenage boys) [​IMG]
    All in all I loved my experience with the CX. They are not the monsters you read about throughout the meat bird forum on BYC.
    What they are:


    • active,
    • intelligent
    • healthy
    • friendly
    They are just chickens who just happen to be extremely food motivated, and were bred to gain weight at a 2:1 feed conversion ratio. *ie: 2 pounds of feed yields 1 pound of chicken*
    The poop smells like poop. The smell is not indistinguishable between any other breed of chicken I have raised. IT smells like poop. Keeping the litter dry and practising the deep litter method surely helps. If it is very humid out, I find Stable Boy helps greatly with the smell. They do poop bigger than other chickens their age because they EAT more.
    If they are not allowed access to full feeders at all hours of the day, they will go on a mission, searching high and low for all of the food that our beautiful mother nature has to offer them. They are amongst the best foragers I have ever witnessed.
    The only negatives I have noted is that they are food aggressive, so ample feeder space is required. They also do eat extremely fast and to watch them is not pleasant. It’s like watching a starving animal inhale their offerings twice a day. No matter what, they always seem to be hungry. They are not starving. Don’t let them trick you into feeding them at all hours because they INSIST they are starving. I don’t buy it [​IMG]
    Please help stop the misinformation about the Cornish X!

    UPDATE:
    I successfully raised two meat hens to 10 months of age. The winter was rough on them not being able to forage, and unfortuantely they got too large. I was however able to get eggs and hatch chicks from them, so meet the second generation. The mothers were commercial broilers (CX or Meat King) and the father was our one and only Jagger, a heritage strain of Barred Plymouth Rock.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    5 days

    [​IMG]
    6 weeks

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Comments

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  1. Old Philosopher
    Came here looking for average butchering age.
    I agree with just about everything positive that's been said in the article, and comments.
    One year we raised heritage birds for meat. What a joke. At 5 months they'd gone through two bags of feed and averaged 2 1/2 lb dressed. The carcasses looked like they'd already been salted and peppered. Never again.
    Cornish-X RULZ!!!
  2. slordaz
    when we processed the one Cornish x we kept free ranging without special feed with our layes, she was a 15 months old and was starting to have trouble getting around, she's been laying 2-4 eggs a week, She dressed out at almost 13 lbs.
    we had a lot better luck with them making em get up and free range just like the layers the layers from day 1 of getting them , we processed the cockerels early (20) weeks still getting birds as big or bigger than that at the store,when they started becoming aggressive and never had the problem with the hens alone of overly aggressive about food, They stayed pretty active until just over a year old
      MossyOaks likes this.
  3. HollistonHomesteading
    I love these chickens. They are so friendly and my kids hold them and pat them all the time. We bought them to raise for meat but fell in love with their personality. Of course they started getting BIG so we did butcher most but kept a few favorites. Maybe we will get a second generation too!
      MossyOaks likes this.
  4. GreatBreeder
    What happened to the CX x BR?
  5. Fields Mountain Farm
    I just wanted to say that is a great article.
    I purchased 50 CX chicks several years ago and raised them with some chicks I'd hatched out of my layer flock, I didn't know how most raise theirs. So I inadvertently saw mine behave just as you have described yours. I butchered them out at about the same time you did yours and had the same types of weights. And I kinda hated to see em go, they really were the friendliest birds in the yard. :)
  6. chickadoodles
    I enjoyed reading your article. I am ordering my first cornish x today they should be here by the end of next week. I will have to keep them separate from my layers as the layers have automatic feeders and food in them at all times. So I will limit these to twice a day feedings. Thank you
  7. katierosew
    I bought three Cornish X's by mistake, and this article has helped me to understand them a lot! I couldn't figure out why I had these supposed gold sex links turning white and were three times the size of my other chicks! I wanted backyard chickens for eggs, but my husband was really looking forward to the meat side of having chickens. Since they aren't the breed I wanted anyway, and they'll probably get too large for the coop, we might cull them just for meat.
  8. Betsy57
    I fed mine chick starter and flock raiser until butcher. No health issues and they were nice and meaty at the time I butchered them. 6-8 weeks.
  9. KatD
    I don't read your recommendations for feed. I just brought home four one week old active, strong Cornish Rock and placed them in the brooder with 2 bantams of the same age. How do you recommend to feed them.
    1. GreatBreeder
      Restrict the feed, no free feed.
  10. Sojourner2
    I've always raised Cornish x with my fancy layer hens. One time I kept a Cornish, named Lucky of course, because I missed her during processing. She became our double yolk Queen of the laying hens. All her eggs were double yolked, don't know if she could have reproduced as we never tried to hatch her eggs, she lived to the age of three, when a fox got in the hen house, she was too slow and earth-bound to get away. We did have to give her a special laying box on the ground as she was too buxom to fly.

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