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The Alamos Chicken House Medium Coop

By wfnackers7, Jun 2, 2015 | Updated: Jun 6, 2015 | | |
  1. wfnackers7
    I spent days and had sleepless nights looking at all of the chicken coops online. My challenge was building the coop on the side of our house. I only found one other plan that built the coop next to an existing structure. I also wanted it completely insulated to help with the heat and cold weather. I did everything myself with no help. It took about a month and half of going at it everyday I had. My wife had most of the design features of course! So Here we go! For your reference all picture descriptions will be below the Picture I am talking about.

    Over all the coop and run is 4 feet by 10 feet. the run is 4 feet by 8 feet. The coop is 3 feet by 4 feet which fits 8 chickens nicely. The nesting box is 14 inches wide by 16 inches deep which is plenty large. and there are 2 of them.

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    This is the lay out I had. Our property ends at the brick wall. And the coop is against the side of the house.

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    Or peach and apricot tree do a good job hiding it.

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    the outside door which is 3 feet wide. Make it a lot easier to clean with the large door.

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    I added the perches out of wood we found, just used 2x4 pieces and cut a solid hole in one side and half hole in the other for easy removal.

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    This is the Gallatin trap door. I decided to place it in-between the studs so it was hided more rather than on the outside of the inside.

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    I ran the wire through the pulley for ease of use. I also switched to a 1/4 thick wire more sturdy. This was taken before I put the inside wall in.

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    Picture of the outside wall with some of the coop walls in.

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    This will be the nesting box side.



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    Nesting box side with plywood on. I put the plywood on and then traced the windows and then took it down and cut it with a jigsaw, came out great that way.
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    A look at the floor so the insulation fits nicely.
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    Inside of the Nesting wall

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    I put up the back wall and the south side and then the front wall. I was afraid the 3 foot door would be to much but I am glad I did it bigger.

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    How the one side connects with the front wall.

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    The wall the lead to the run. notice how I left the gap on left for the trap door. Also if you haven't found those screws find them! they drill as they drive best screw ever.

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    Connecting of walls

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    its level!

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    That is the door leading to the run. I was afraid the ramp was to steep, but even the month old chick was able to get up with no problems! I was also afraid the 11inch by 11 inch coop door was to small, but it is plenty big.

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    This is the 5 gallon auto feeder. this is how I connected the bottom with a screw valve, it already has come in hand to be able to disconnect the tubing from the bucket, a must have!


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    The front window.

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    Framing for the nesting boxes and food and water storage, note I will remove this and finish the side against the wall of the house.

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    I removed the framing and finished the inside wall.

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    Siding and trim and window put in.

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    Siding and trim for the front.

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    Added the roof for the boxes and storage area, still needs door.

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    This is the auto feeder it is only 3 feet tall and I insulated it because there was gaps. Note a 3 foot auto feeder for 8 chickens last about a week!

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    Framing to hold the water bucket

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    Over view of the storage area with water and food

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    Doors added to nesting boxes with cedar insides

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    Tray for nesting box

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    completed view of boxes

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    Made a mini feeder for inside coop, while the were younger they used quit a bit.

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    inside view of tray for nesting boxes

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    The door for the outside of the coop completely sealing by putting it on the inside of the framing.

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    the door halfway up.

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    the pull for the coop door

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    the tray for the inside of the coop, makes cleaning a breeze, must have!

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    Another mini water I made for the inside for the young chicks but they seemed to grow out of it.

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    finished view of the inside.

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    looking through the door of the bottom of the run.

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    The bottom of the auto feeder, just used 4 inch PVC. Also you can only have one 90 degree angle for the food to work properly I tried a 45 and it wouldn't flow to the bottom.

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    There was some excessive cutting to fit the tube into the storage area, but used small pieces of wood and insulation to seal holes.

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    The 8 inch hardware for the hinges were expensive! but with the heavy doors for insulation made it necessary.

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    nesting box and storage side.



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    The original floor plans. had to move the strawberries to make room.
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    Again the side of the house the coop went against.

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    The laid out blocks for the foundation. I also raised the nesting box area because of our sloping sidewalk, made it easier.

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    The back wall up with the one side attached

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    The tool set up, convinced my wife to get a new saw to get the job done which it sure did!

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    Close up of hardware cloth that was sandwiched between studs, was probably the biggest pain to do but worth it cosmetically.

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    Insulation used for 2x4 framing

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    The roof construction.

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    Used those joints to secure the roof rafters, wish I just built the framing for the roof and then put that up instead.

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    The floor with insulation in.

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    Roof with the trim and paper down

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    Adding shingles. the roof never leaked by the way!

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    This is the inside view of the coop door and how I ran the cable through the walls with the pulley.

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    I did ad electrical wiring so in the need of a heat lamp it was done.

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    Framing for the doors and windows

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    The tray for the inside of the coop

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    The inside of the coop is completely lined with cedar planks this will help with smell and bugs.

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    The wiring for the plug to add a heater If needed for winter.

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    The inside of the 5 gallon bucket waterer, used screw together pvc with washers on both sides and then caulked it as well.

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    the inside of the waterer with the chicken nipples.

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Comments

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  1. wfnackers7
    The entire foot print is 4x10 feet by 7 feet tall. The inside coop is 4x3 feet by 4 feet high. the nesting boxes and storage area is 4 feet by 16inches and 5 feet tall.
  2. Cheep N Peep
    What is the coops overall dimensions?

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