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the-aloha-chicken-project

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  1. alohachickens
    Meet my colorful flock of Aloha Chickens!

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    What are Aloha Chickens? A few years ago, I saw a photo of "Swedish Flower Hens" on Feathersite. I decided they were exactly what I was looking for. The only problem was, back in 2008, there were NO Swedish Flowers in the United States! HMMM. What to do?

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    Above: Confetti colored Aloha hen.

    So, I set about trying to make my own All-American version of Blommehons, or Swedish Flower Chickens!

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    I couldn't call them "Swedish Flowers" if they were bred in America and had no Swedish blood, so I had to come up with a new name for this breed. "American Flower" just didn't have the same ring to it.

    I thought about Hawaii, our 50th State and the super-colorful Aloha shirts from there, and decided to call them "Aloha Chickens". (Even though I'm actually in Arizona!) The goal became to create a useful farm chicken that was also super-colorful. Sort of like if you took your Rhode Island Reds and dressed them up in crazy Aloha shirts!

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    Above: Three orange-mottled Aloha Chicken pullets.

    I had a hard time creating anything that looked remotely like a Swedish Flower Hen at first. I tried Exchequer Leghorns crossed with Speckled Sussex, but the chicks just looked like one parent or the other. Nothing new or exciting was happening, until I found one weird hen in a neighbor's yard. I have absolutely no idea what was in her background, but her color was unlike anything I'd ever seen before She was white with little flecks of gold and black all over. I guess the color would technically be called something like Creole or Crele with Mottling or the Pied gene - but I find it a lot easier to just call this color "Confetti".

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    Her son "Vanilla" wasn't that colorful, but he was a gorgeous rooster overall, big and robust, and I knew he carried all kinds of fabulous colors because of his Mom. "Vanilla" was the foundation rooster for my Aloha flock:

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    Above: Foundation Aloha rooster, "Vanilla"

    When the offspring of Vanilla were crossed together, the Confetti color proved very easy to reproduce!


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    Shades of Confetti vary from mostly dark with a few white flecks to nearly white with bits of peachy feathers peeking through here or there.

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    (Early Alohas have showed double combs and muffs, but future generations are being bred for clean faces, yellow legs, and single combs.)

    The Confetti color also appears in roosters:

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    Above: Patch, a foundation Aloha rooster.

    My Aloha flock is now very unique. Even though it started with a goal to just copy what was found in Sweden, already some new and exciting colors have appeared that are not found in Swedish Flower Hens. I have worked really hard to expand this bloodline, hatching out hundreds of chicks just to find the few truly special ones.

    I've had true red/white mottled (with little or no black):

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    Above: Flame, a red mottled Aloha rooster.

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    Above and Below: Red Mottled Aloha Chickens

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    Some lovely orange mottled Alohas, with black and white accents:

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    Above and below: Orange mottled foundation Aloha hens.

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    Another color that resembles a lighter Jubilee Orpington:

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    And also a very unique "Pumpkin" color that is usually only found in some lines of Game birds, (Pumpkin Hulsey Games)

    Below: Pumpkin Mottled Aloha Roosters.

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    Recently, I've had my first Buff Barred Mottled Rooster:


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    And a Buff Mottled Hen:

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    This is very much a breed in progress. Now I'm getting all sorts of fun colors but my Alohas are small, and even though they are good layers, the eggs are only small to medium in size. The goal now is to outcross the small Aloha foundation stock with five main popular laying breeds. These outcross breeds include: Speckled Sussex, New Hampshire Red, Buff Rock, Rhode Island Red, and Buff Orpington. The end goal is to create a big, hearty, dual-purpose farm breed . . . but dressed up in a very colorful package. Already some BYC'ers have stepped up to help, but more are needed to make this project a success!

    Feel free to follow my Blog here for updates and info: http://alohachickens.blogspot.com/

    This website is no longer updated, but it does have the history of the project for the first two years:

    http://www.alohachickens.webs.com/

    And, there is also a BYC thread you can follow to see updates by fellow members:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/600281/the-aloha-chicken-project

    It has been a ton of work, but I'm so thrilled with the progress so far! Please note the PHOTOS show chickens that DO NOT CONTAIN ANY SWEDISH FLOWER BLOODLINES! While I may introduce Swedish Flower Hens to the mix now that they are available in the US, the chickens shown on this page were all created in the U.S. without any imported stock. Cool, huh?

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    Above: Two colorful Aloha roosters.

    Aloha Chickens are very tough, strong, disease resistant, active and good fliers. Excellent layers of small to medium tinted eggs. They are currently small in size and show much variation but goal to eventually create a heavier, single-combed, yellow-legged dual purpose farm and homestead breed, while keeping the wonderful colors you see here.

    Have a great day and thanks for reading!

    - Aloha!

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    **UPDATE** March 2017 - Alohas continue to get bigger thanks to infusion of Light Sussex and Buff Sussex bloodlines.
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    In 2015, a Turken hen was used because she had great size, buff color, and yellow legs. The resulting offspring (Aloha Naked Necks) have been very popular with Turken enthusiasts. The Naked Neck feature has made them very heat resistant in the Phoenix temps and they have thrived. An unexpected "happy accident" that worked out wonderfully.
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Comments

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  1. chisandchicks
    I love the puffy cheeked ones!! I am getting some Alohas from a wonderful gentleman near me here in Arizona and I am excited to see the chicks I get from my RRI roo and my Hamburg-[White] Leghorn-x roo. Also, I have Speckled Sussex and Red Sex Links and Aracauna hens, so if I get an Aloha Roo that would be okay to! lol.
    I am just so excited about this project; I would like a heat-tolerant, dual purpose chicken.
    ** I do want to stay up to the Aloha's standard though...
    Any thoughts or suggestion y'all?
  2. SmallFarmChick
    wow. I love these guys!
  3. alohachickens
    To anyone who wants some of these - if you want to get a jump start with Sussex crosses, that will really speed up your progress. We have had pretty rotten luck with shipped eggs, so far, but we have new breeders set up in the Pacific NW (Oregon and Washington) and now in Kansas, too! But, if you have a flock developed of say New Hampshire Red and Buff Rocks or Welsummer hens crossed with a Sussex rooster, and keep some of the hen-chicks, all you will need is a couple of Aloha roosters to mix with those to get your own flock started. That might be helpful if we are dealing with shipped eggs. Hopefully, with new breeders in the Midwest and NW, the shipped eggs might hatch better, if they don't have to travel as far? More Live shipped chicks should be available this October, too. (Which is the most sure-fire way to get started.)
  4. alohachickens
    @highpointfarm - (and anyone else who wants to get involved.) A good "base" stock is Speckled Sussex crossed with any big, good egg layer in one solid color, like Rhode Island Red, New Hampshire Red, Buff Orpington or Buff Rock. Do be careful to avoid "sex links" like Red Stars or Golden Comets, as these cross-breeds might bring in some unwanted genes. Also avoid barred chickens (like Barred Rock) and use solid-color alternatives (like Buff Rock or Partridge Rock) instead. The Barring gene can get really dominant in a hurry! It's used in a lot of sex links, too, so stick with plain old "solid" buff or brown chickens for out-crossing, just so you know exactly what you're getting in the offspring. Then, add in your Aloha bloodlines for color. But if you already have some nice Sussex crosses, you'll be ahead of the game!
  5. bruceh
    i would love to have some these
  6. BullardBarnyard
    Goodness, so pretty! And with that, Aloha.
  7. wowmanacat
    I love the colors of your chickens. I am not sure what I have but I have some with black, brown, red and white in them. Most of the chickens that I have are barnyard mutt. I love the color of them.
  8. Nielsen6
    I want a few of these, they are gorgeous! Please let us know when we can get them.
  9. orpfancier
    What beautiful birds! I can't wait to see how the next generation will turn out.
  10. LaynaDon95
    Gorgeous!! What an amazing job!

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