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The Last One Inn

Rating:
4/5,
  1. BeardedWalrus
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    The Coop
    We started this coop by building a small retaining wall behind our recently completed tractor shed.
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    After backfilling the wall with all the newly acquired rock, we topped it off with a nice layer of dirt and leveled the area where the coop/run would be.
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    We then used the top of the 6x6 wall as the ledge to frame our wall on.
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    We then sheeted the wall with exterior siding, painted by Christy.
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    Next was the framing for the floor. We built the outside and squared it, then rested it on temporary braces. This located where to dig our outside post.

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    After setting the posts we finished framing (2"x6" @ 16" OC), then sheeted the floor with 3/4" plywood.
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    After the floor was sheeted, we used some temporary boards and some string to match the roof pitch of the tractor shed. This helped figure the rear wall height.
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    Here, Reid is helping me start the rear wall framing. We chose to frame this wall (and the others) in place.
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    The egg boxes, and future ones, were figured into the framing. The initial plan is to sheet over all of them and cut out/build as needed.
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    Wall framing complete. The shutters were bought cheap at the Habitat Re-Store.
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    On to the roof. 2"x4" @ 16" OC with 1"x3" lathing and a White metal roof. (Also proper ladder safety, it makes a great chair)
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    We sheeted the walls with the same exterior siding we used earlier, just a different paint job.
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    We also hung the freshly painted door. It was also picked up at the Re-Store.
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    Finally dried in. From this picture you can tell that I missed the roof pitch by a hair, adds character (only one like it in the world).
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    A few interior shots...
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    This is the inside view of the framing for the future egg boxes
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    Christy laid some linoleum squares to protect the plywood. We also added a 2x6 around the perimeter to keep the shavings out of the walls and to make cleaning easier. We are still not sure if we will sheet the inside of the walls or not? We will also add a clean-out door near the back/right corner.
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    ...then covered it with pine shavings.
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    So the chickens, and their wonderful smell, are out of our house and into their new home.
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    ... due to a miscalculation (My Wife attributed it to "chicken math") more "cute" and "stinky" chicks in my house.
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    So this is a start to the brooder/chicken stage/droppings board.
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    ..and then the ramp and roost. The girls figure it out quickly.

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    ..and our SDW bantam is a high and precise flyer.
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    Notice behind and above me that the coop is open air above all 4 walls. It's hard to see, but there's hardware cloth preventing outside entry on every side.



    The Run
    We extended the 6"x6" wall out another 10' to help predator proof this side of the run
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    Again, we back filled the wall and fine graded the area that would be the run.
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    On to post setting in the wonderful land of rocks. My 4"x4" post were set 4' on center and cut to 6'-6" height at completion. Due to all the rock where I wanted posts, it took me half a day to set these 5 post.....but I saved the best rock for the first post of the next day.
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    This rock was about 5" below the surface very close to where I wanted my last post of the row.
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    We had to get creative on the fence line that topped the timber wall.
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    1/2" hardware cloth all around. The widest roll we could find was 4', that's where the 4' post spacing came from. 2"x4" 's toe-nailed between the post helped with stability and as a good nailer backing for the fence. We attached the fence with thousands of staples. We extended it down 6" and then out another 6" then topped it with the many rocks we had available.
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    The chickens have really enjoyed the extra space.
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    On to the pop-door...
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    The automatic door has been really nice.
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    We also added a small covered area for additional shade and a covered watering/feeding area.
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    The chickens first auto door closing. We decided to grab a beer and watch the sun go down. The door finally closed, it has to be completely dark for it to activate.
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    Here's Reid taking his turn with the Jigsaw.
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    We added a latch that was lock-in resistant. It has a place to attach a string for opening the latch from the inside. We also added a lock for added difficulty for predators. The key hangs on a string beside the lock.
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    The brooder is nearly complete, also notice our small fresh air fan. It draws cool air from the North side of our coop.
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    We topped the open area of the coop with bird netting for the time being. We ran a cable from the fence corner to the corner post, then draped the bird netting across the top.
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    It took 70 days to get from this..
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    ...to this.
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    The 70 days did include an 18' x 24' tractor shed as well as the coop, plus 2 raised beds, gardening, and running 4 businesses through the process.

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    Here's a copy of our rough hand drawn plans.
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    Things to add in the near future...
    1. egg boxes
    2. additional trim
    3. overhead hardware cloth to replace the bird netting
    4. storage cabinet inside coop
    5. re-work inside ladder to be moveable to access brooder
    6. add an additional fan. Exhaust high in the wall
    7. add a hardline electrical outlet

    Thank You for viewing our Coop/Run!
    Steven, Christy, and Reid

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Comments

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  1. CTKen
    Looks great. I just greeted your good lady here on BYC this morning - better watch what you say in future (lol)
  2. Whittni
    It turned out great! Thanks for sharing!

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