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The Vintage Nest

  1. Mrschick
    I took someones trash and I turned it into my idea of a dream coop. It had to be a darling little house to look at from my kitchen window and it had to be equally as charming on the inside. It was on old old goat shed that sat out in a field in Oskaloosa Ks. It had seen better days. But today it is a chickens cozy little place to call home. I made it look as much like a home on the inside as I did on the outside. The roost looks similar to a dinning room table and the nesting boxes look more like a piece of furniture with a decorative vintage look. The ramp up to the boxes look more like a stair case because of where it is placed along the white washed walls. Vintage egg beaters and whisks adorn the walls along with an aged photo of my family with old hens from the past. There is a small foyer where you can sit and enjoy watching the hens peck around while reading an Urban farmers magazine. We named it "The Vintage Nest" because you feel like you have just entered an old farmhouse. All that is missing is the smell of apple pie.






    Before : Tons of mud daubers and spiders.....eek! Look at the ugly holes in the tin and it's all bent up.! Mostly built with recycled materials from neighbors to Habitat for homes. The shed cost was the price of the scrap tin at $35.00. We didn't know what we were going to do but I knew it would be great. We didn't have a plan, just a heart and a love for backyard city chickens.


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    We opened it up, straightened out the tin, repaired the back wall and framed it up for support.

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    Plain old storm window

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    Getting the trim up.

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    Super easy faux window panes turn an ugly old window bound for the trash into a cottage gem.

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    blanket canvas...Oh what to do?



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    I decided on black trim to match the main house.

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    Gotta have a window box!

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    My coop sign and a matching wreath.

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    I hand made a small Mason jar lantern to hang by the door. My design allows it to be sealed tight from the elements. It adds charm and a vintage feel.

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    The nest in the wreath displays two small eggs. This is actually a rock from my garden that looked like two eggs. I just painted them. It goes well with my Coop name "The Vintage Nest"

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    The old chicken shack will be carted off and refurbished for our bunny and the chicken pen will get a new look later if I can beat the snow,

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    The Mason jar porch light glowing in the night.

    My total cost for my new coop is $195.00 It's not perfect but I am proud to look out my kitchen window and see it. It is so darn cute!

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    A look through the window.
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    Lets go inside.
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    The chickens are on one side of the coop.
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    My girls with their first hens.
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    The roost
    Vintage screen door.
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    A place to store food and supplies for the hens and a place to sit and watch them peck around.
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    Black Pearl figuring out how to get to the nesting boxes.
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Comments

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  1. Mrschick
    Thank you for your comment. It's a good question. We had a hard winter here and I am glad to see it go. The Vintage Nest stayed nice and warm all winter with the deep litter method and no source of heat. We had six large hens all winter and they did well with one bronchial infection and a few with minor frost bite (may have been due to water dripped on their combs). But over all the coop was well ventilated and dry, it also held up large amounts of snow fall. Now, to anwser your question, it did have a layer of dust on everything through out the winter months but once it warmed up I cleaned out the winter litter, sweeped up the tile floor just like I do my own (but with a mask on). I dusted off the nesting box and washed down the cat walk in front of the nesting boxes. It stayed pretty clean as far as poop. The girls kept the poop on the floor just under the roost. I put down a new layer of wood shavings over the tile floor, which by the way swept up and cleaned up super easy. I gave there little curtian a shake, shake and opened up the window for some fresh air and it is still as cute as the first day they moved in. I really love this coop and so do all six of my hens.
  2. dollydaylillies
    How are you going to keep it clean???
  3. Stumpy
    Thanks for sharing the inside!
  4. Mrschick
    I just posted pictures of the inside. It's finally done and we can get back to some normalcy around here. Geesh!
  5. Stumpy
    Sometimes men can't see potential!! You did a great job. It looks beautiful.
  6. Trefoil
    $35 well spent. Its beautiful and even better, a nice coop.
  7. Fancychooklady
    Inspiring, I have one in the making, you have given me more inspiration . Wait till I show hubby.[​IMG]
  8. Farmer Mario
    WOW! lots of creative stuff and put together very well. Outstanding,grate work!
  9. featherweightmn
    Ha! I love the picture of the girls going inside! LOL!
  10. joan1708
    Nice chickens too!

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