Yinepu's Swap Page

By yinepu, Nov 14, 2013 | Updated: Apr 27, 2014 | |
  1. yinepu
    * ~ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ ~ *
    Available for Swapping:
    as a note..
    I'll update this as I add more goodies or as they are gone.. some items may have limited quantities.. for more info send a PM.. pics will be added as I get the chance..

    I do NOT ship out of the country ..so USA only please. I also do NOT supply eggs for resale since this is for swapping only and I'm not running a business.

    There are times when I will do custom orders.. so if you have requested a custom item please allow appropriate time for me to get things made..

    Heirloom Seeds:
    Note: Seeds from Annie's Heirloom Seeds state they are packaged for 2013. just received them November 2013, so they are for Spring 2014
    Golden Bantam Sweet Corn (brand new packet from Annie's Heirloom Seeds.. package states it has a minimum of 100 seeds)
    Our soil is just too rocky for messing with corn.. so I won't be using these description from the website: "70-85 day. A nice, heirloom yellow sweet corn. The one from which most of the original hybrid yellow sweet corns were developed. When picked at it's peak, it has a sweet, rich corn flavor that rivals any hybrid. "
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    Mignonette Alpine Strawberry (brand new packet from Annie's Heirloom Seeds.. package states it has a minimum of 50 seeds)
    I ordered a pack and they sent an extra in the grab bag.. don't need both this coming spring! description from the website: "Known for it’s excellent flavor, these delicious strawberries don’t have the high yields of Alexandria. If you are all about flavor, this is the strawberry for you".
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    White Wonder Tomato (brand new packet from Annie's Heirloom Seeds.. package states it has a minimum of 25 seeds)
    We have a bunch of tomato seeds.. so these will be extras. description from the website: "78 day. White-yellow, lemon sized and shaped tomato. It has a good, mild taste."
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    Parsley, Moss Curled (brand new packet from Annie's Heirloom Seeds.. package states it has a minimum of 200 seeds)
    Parsley doesn't do too well here.. so it's up for grabs. description from the website: "75 day. Moss Curled Parsley has tightly curled leaves that are quick to mature and regrow rapidly. It has a milder flavor than the Italian Flat Leaf Parsley and is an excellent garnish as well as seasoning."
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    I have more seeds coming in within the next week or so.. so I'll add what I don't want from the grab bag assortment

    * ~ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ ~ *
    Other Seeds:
    enroute .. should be here Monday according to tracking:
    Please note, info is from eBay seller treeseedsplus who I purchased these seeds from.. some of the images are from google. Info posted here is for the sole purpose of trades.. I am NOT selling excess seeds. If you wish to purchase the seeds from the eBay seller please contact them as I am only a customer of theirs! They do have a LARGE selection of seeds.. so are worth checking out!
    These are all SEEDS.. no cuttings or plants


    Goji Berry, Lycium chinense:
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    Fast Growth, Easy to Grow, Showy Edible Fruits, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Drought Tolerant
    Goji berry is a vine-like, multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub with sprawling branches that typically grows to 3 to 6 feet tall. Occasional thorns appear on the stems. It is native to slopes, roadsides, disturbed areas and wastelands in Southern China. Ovate, rhombic, elliptic or lanceolate leaves 1 to 3 inches long are bright green. Small, tubular, pale purple to lavender flowers bloom in spring on stalks rising from the leaf axils. Bright red berries (Goji berries) are about 7/8 inch long and mature in fall. Ripe berries are edible (sweet licorice flavor). Berries (fresh or dried), young shoots and leaves are used in oriental cooking. Berries are used to make an herbal tea. Berries are dried for herbal use. China reportedly produces over 5 million kilograms of dried fruit per year. This is a long time medicinal plant (leaves, roots and berries) in China.
    Other Names: Wolfberry, Goji Berry, Gojiberry, Chinese Matrimony Vine, Chinese Wolfberry, Chinese Boxthorn, Mede Berry, Barbary Matrimony Vine, Bocksdorn, Duke of Argyll's Tea Tree, Murali, Red Medlar, or Matrimony Vine.
    Zone: 6 to 9
    Growth Rate: Fast
    Plant Type: Fruiting Deciduous Shrub
    Family: Solanaceae
    Native Range: Southern China
    Height: 3 to 6 feet
    Spread: 3 to 10 feet
    Bloom Time: May to August
    Bloom Color: Purple, Lavender
    Sun: Full Sun
    Drought Tolerance: High
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Medium
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Grow in moderately fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Plants tolerate some light shade. Established plants tolerate some drought. Where winter hardy, this shrub will naturalize by self seeding and by suckering.
    Culture: Stems may be pruned back to 2 feet tall in late winter each year to keep plants at a reasonable size with less sprawling. If grown for fruit production, branches may be attached to a trellis to facilitate harvest.
    Uses: Erosion Control, Hedge, Will Naturalize. Interesting ornamental landscape shrub which can also be grown for harvest of leaves, berries, young shoots and roots for culinary purposes. Informal hedge. Shrub border. Dry/sandy banks or slopes. Spreads rapidly.
    Sowing Lycium chinense Seeds:
    The seeds of Goji Berry are very small.
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water for 24 hours
    Stratify: None
    Germination: Surface sow indoors under a grow light. Use a dome lid and mist regularly to keep moist. Requires light for germination. Artificial light is recommended.

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4

    Northern Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum:
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    Brilliant Fall Colors, Shade Tree, Bonsai, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Wind and Urban Tolerant
    Sugar Maple is a large, moderate to slow growing, long lived deciduous tree. It will typically grow 40 to 80 feet tall (sometimes to 100 feet) with a large dense, rounded crown and a trunk up to 3 feet in diameter. It is one of the giants of the forest providing abundant shade and beautiful fall foliage. Sugar Maple has deeply furrowed gray bark which turns almost black when wet. Its leaves are medium green, opposite, palmately lobed (3 to 6 inches wide with 3 to 5 lobes) turning brilliant yellow, orange and red in autumn. Fruit are two-winged horseshoe-shaped samaras about 1 inch long, appearing in clusters, brown when mature in the fall. Sugar Maple grows about 1 foot each year in most soils but is sensitive to reflected heat and to drought, turning the leaves brown (scorch) along their edges. Leaf scorch from dry soil is often evident in areas where the root system is restricted to a small soil area, such as a street tree planting. It is more drought tolerant in open areas where the roots can proliferate into a large soil space.
    Sugar Maple is a main component of the Eastern U.S. hardwood forest and is one of the trees which are most responsible for giving New England its reputation for spectacular fall color. This majestic tree is an excellent choice for larger landscapes, parks, and estates. It is not particularly tolerant of air pollution, though. Native Americans taught the early colonists how to tap these trees to make maple syrup which has now become a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. and Canada. It's an important timber tree in the forest products trade, as well as the source of maple syrup and sugar, a major industry in the northeastern U.S. The sap is tapped from the trees in early spring and then boiled down until it is thick enough to be called syrup. It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. Don't try this in the kitchen - you'll have a layer of sticky film on the walls and ceiling. Charcoal made from Sugar Maple is used to "mellow" Jack Daniels[​IMG] whiskey.
    Other Names: Sugar Maple, Hard Maple, Rock Maple
    Zone: 3 to 8
    Growth Rate: Slow-Medium
    Plant Type: Medium-Large size deciduous tree
    Family: Aceraceae
    Native Range: Eastern North America
    Height: 40 to 80 feet
    Spread: 30 to 60 feet
    Shape: Upright oval when younger. Large, dense and rounded crown when mature.
    Bloom Time: April
    Bloom Color: Greenish
    Flower/Fruit: small yellowish green flowers, before leaves in April followed by samaras, 1" to 1.75" inches long as a pair they form a horseshoe shape
    Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade
    Fall Color: Very Showy; Brilliant yellow, orange and red
    Drought Tolerance: Moderate
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Medium
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Prefers fertile, slightly acidic soil. Shade tolerant.
    Culture: The limbs of Sugar Maple are usually strong and not susceptible to wind damage. The bark forms attractive bright gray plates which stand out especially during the winter. Roots are often shallow and reach the surface at an early age, even in sandy soil. Plant in an area where grass below it will not need to be mowed so the roots will not be damaged by the mower. A variety of birds use the tree for food, nesting and cover and the fruits are especially popular with squirrels.
    Uses: Excellent specimen tree for the lawn or parks. May be used as a street tree as long as it can be located on a street and in a location where road salt, soil compaction and pollution will not be significant problems.
    Sowing Acer saccharum Seeds:
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water 24 Hours
    Stratify: Cold 60-90 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium (Not wet).
    Germination: Sow 1/2” Deep, Keep moist (Not wet).

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4


    Winter Honeysuckle Shrub, Lonicera fragrantissima:
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    Hardy, Adaptable, Easy to Grow, Fast Growth, Fragrant Flowering Shrub, Ornamental Fruit, Attracts Birds, Cold, Heat and Drought Tolerant
    Winter Honeysuckle is a shrub, not a vine, but it has those familiar honeysuckle flowers and that sweet honeysuckle scent. Winter Honeysuckle grows 6 to 10 feet tall and its irregular, tangled branches form a twisted labyrinth as much as 6 to 10 feet across. The leaves are nearly evergreen in the South but deciduous in cooler climates. The leaves are borne in opposing pairs along the slender, arching stems. Flowering begins in late winter and lasts for several weeks, filling the air with fragrance when nothing else is blooming. The flowers are extremely abundant, creamy white, about a half inch long and arranged in pairs in the leaf axils. The flowers are followed by small red berries that are attractive to birds.
    Zone: 4 to 9
    Growth Rate: Fast
    Plant Type: Wide spreading, deciduous shrub (evergreen in the south)
    Family: Caprifoliaceae
    Native Range: Eastern China
    Height: Up to 10 feet
    Spread: Up to 10 feet
    Shape: Irregular, rounded form
    Bloom Time: Late winter-very early spring
    Flower/Fruit: Fragrant, lemon-scented, creamy white flowers followed by small red berries.
    Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade
    Fall Color: None
    Drought Tolerance: Moderate-High
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Low
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Prefers loamy, well-drained, moist soil but will tolerate most soils.
    Culture: Keep Winter Honeysuckle in bounds by pruning back once or twice a year. You can even cut it to the ground and it will send up new shoots.
    Uses: Barrier, screen or hedge, massing or grouping for fragrance of flowers.
    Sowing Lonicera fragrantissima Seeds:
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water for 24 hours
    Stratify: Cold 30-90 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.
    Germination: Sow 1/8” Deep

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4


    Eastern Red Bud, Cercis canadensis:
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    Fast Growth, Showy Flowers, Fall Colors, Attracts Butterflies, Street Tree, Shrub Border, Specimen Tree, Cold Tolerant, Bonsai
    Eastern Redbud is a small to medium sized deciduous ornamental tree, often maturing at 15 feet tall by 15 feet wide, but can become twice as large under optimum conditions. It has an upright vase growth habit in youth becoming more rounded with age. It is fast growing in youth becoming moderate with age. Redbuds are best known for their pink to purple-lavender, pea-like flowers, which bloom profusely in April before the foliage emerges and persists for two to three weeks. Flowers may be directly on the trunk or branches, but most are on two-year-old wood. Redbud features heart shaped leaves, emerging bronzed to medium green, slowly turning to dark green, 3 to 5 inches across, turning yellow in fall. Its fruits are brown flat pods about 2 to 3 inches long. The trunk of this small tree usually has branches close to the ground resulting in a spreading, flat-topped to rounded crown.
    Leaf: Alternate, simple, cordate in shape, 3 to 5 inches long and wide, with an entire margin, thin and papery, petioles conspicuously swollen on both ends; green above and slightly paler below.
    Flower: Very showy, pea-like, pink to light purple in color, 1/2 inch long, appearing in clusters all along even older stems in early spring before the leaves.
    Fruit: Flattened, dry legumes, brown, 2 to 4 inches long that contain flat, elliptical, brown seeds 1/4 inch long, maturing in late summer.
    Twig: Slender and zigzag, nearly black in color, spotted with lighter lenticels, leaf buds are tiny and dark red to chestnut in color; flowers buds are round and often numerous in large clusters on older woody stems.
    Bark: Initially smooth and brown; later ridged and furrowed to scaly and dark gray; may have some maroon patches evident and orange in the cracks.
    Form: A large shrub or small tree up to 30 feet with a short, often twisted trunk and spreading branches.
    Other Names: Redbud, Eastern Redbud, Judas Tree
    Zone: 4 to 9
    Growth Rate: Fast in youth becoming moderate with age.
    Plant Type: Small to medium sized deciduous tree.
    Family: Fabaceae (Pea Family)
    Native Range: Eastern and Midwestern United States.
    Height: 15 to 30 feet
    Spread: 15 to 30 feet
    Shape: Upright vase growth habit in youth becoming more rounded with age.
    Bloom Time: April
    Bloom Color: Pink
    Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade
    Fall Color: Yellow
    Drought Tolerance: Moderate
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Low
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Prefers and needs a moist, rich, well-drained soil in partial sun to partial shade for long-term optimum performance, but is somewhat adaptable to many types of soils, soil pHs, dry soils, and other moderately stressful situations. It will not grow well in permanently wet or poorly drained soil.
    Culture: Redbud does not transplant easily, it should be planted in a permanent location when young.
    Uses: Redbud is an attractive tree in many situations including a specimen tree, shrub border, street tree or lawn tree in residential areas. It is especially attractive in group plantings or in naturalized settings.
    Sowing Cercis canadensis Seeds:
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Pour Hot water over seed. Soak for 24 hours.
    Stratify: Cold 30 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.
    Germination: Sow 1/4” Deep

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4

    Riverbank Grape, Vitis riparia:
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    Hardy, Adaptable, Easy to Grow, Fragrant Flowering Vine, Edible Fruits, Ornamental Fruit, Fall Color, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food, Cold Tolerant
    Riverbank Grape is a North American grape and one of the hardiest species in the world surviving temperatures as low as minus -40F. It is a stunning vigorous climbing vine, up to 50 feet, with variable 3 to 7 inch leaves (rounded or deeply lobed) displaying beautiful gold and red autumn colors. It usually climbs trees, shrubs or fence rows, but will rise only 1/2-2 feet above the ground while sprawling in open areas. The blooming period occurs during the late spring and lasts about 2 to 3 weeks. The small greenish-white or greenish-yellow flowers have 5 tiny petals, and a fragrant musky scent. The flowers are replaced by 1/4 to 1/2 inch black fruit in clusters to 6 inches that develop during the summer. The grapes are sweetly acidic and have a lovely flavor when allowed to fully ripen on the vine, thus excellent for winemaking and jellies. Highly valued by wildlife and perfect for naturalizing woodland areas or along fences and of course as root stock.
    This species is used extensively as a rootstock in today's European wineries. Those who enjoy a glass of vino fino owe a debt of gratitude to humble Vitis riparia . Even today Vitis vinifera vines are propagated on Vitis riparia rootstock to control phylloxera a devastating disease that will kill or severely harm own root Vitis vinifera. So if you want to grow your own grapes for wine or preserves, it is best to use this species as a rootstock.
    Other Names: Riverbank Grape, Frost Grape
    Zone: 3 to 9
    Growth Rate: Fast
    Plant Type: Woody perennial fruiting vine
    Family: Vitaceae
    Native Range: Eastern North America
    Height: up to 50 feet
    Shape: Climbing Vine
    Bloom Time: June-July
    Bloom Color: Greenish-white or greenish-yellow
    Sun: Full Sun
    Fall Color: Gold and Reds
    Drought Tolerance: Moderate
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Low
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun. Tolerates heat, cold and some wind.
    Culture: Prune hard in fall or early spring to control rapid growth.
    Uses: Rootstock. The beautiful foliage makes this an excellent vine for a trellis, arbor or screen.
    Sowing Vitis riparia Seeds:
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water for 24 hours
    Stratify: Cold 90-180 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium (Not wet).
    Germination: Sow 1/4” Deep, Keep moist (Not wet).

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4

    American Elderberry, Sambucus canadensis:
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    American Elderberry Shrub, Sambucus canadensis, Seeds
    Northern Source

    These seeds are from a Northern range collection which are more cold hardy than Southern range collection.
    Showy Edible Fruit, Fast Growth, Hardy, Fragrant Flowering Shrub, Fall Colors, Hedge Plant, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food, Cold and Drought Tolerant
    American Elderberry is a bushy, multi-stemmed, wide spreading shrub or small tree with deciduous compound leaves. It typically grows 10 to 15 feet tall, with a similar spread. The leaves of the American Elderberry are opposite, pinnately compound (featherlike) and up to a foot long. Large, terminal, flat-topped clusters of fragrant, tiny star shaped white flowers arranged in showy sprays up to 10 inches across appear in spring. The flowers are followed by clusters of shiny dark purple to black, berry-like fruits (drupes) in late summer to fall. Fruit may be used to make preserves, jellies, pies and wine. Fruit is also attractive to wildlife. In the fall, Elderberries put on a colorful display of yellows, oranges and reds.
    American Elderberry can be a very attractive shrub in bloom, but it tends to be gangly and unkempt, and it keeps sending up new suckers. It responds well to pruning and can be kept in a manageable size and shape with proper vigilance. With its wide clusters of shiny blue-black berries, Elderberry is very attractive in fruit, too, but the birds may eat the berries before you're done appreciating them!
    American Elderberry, whether in bloom, in fruit, or even just decked out in their pretty lacy foliage, makes a very ornamental planting. American Elderberry can be coppiced (cut nearly to the ground) to force more bushiness to make a visual screen.
    The flowers of American Elderberry are used to make Elderflower water which is used in perfumes and confectioneries. Raw Elderberries have an unpleasant taste and contain small amounts of poisonous alkaloids. Cooking destroys the alkaloids and improves the taste. The dried berries are said to be good to eat raw. Cooked Elderberries are made into pies, jellies and of course, Elderberry wine. Harvest entire clusters of fruit, strip from the stems, simmer with a little water for 15 minutes, squeeze out the juice in a cheesecloth jelly bag, and prepare jelly or wine as you would with any other fruit juice. The flowers are also edible and used in jams, jellies and are the basis of Elderflower Fritters. Dip entire clusters of blossoms in flour and fry. A delightful, pale wine resembling champagne is also made from the flowers.
    Native Americans made much use of the American Elderberry. They used the bark, flowers and fruits for medicines; they made cakes, puddings and breads from the berries; and they made nonalcoholic and alcoholic drinks from the berries. Elderberries have more vitamin C per unit weight than oranges or tomatoes. Young boys of not-too-long-ago knew that the pithy stems of American Elderberry are easily whittled hollow to make blow guns and whistles. The berries are relished by no fewer than 50 kinds of birds.
    Common Name: American Elder, American Elder Berry
    Zone: 3 to 9
    Growth Rate: Fast
    Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
    Family: Caprifoliaceae
    Native Range: Eastern North America
    Height: 5 to 12 feet
    Spread: 5 to 12 feet
    Shape: Multi-stemmed, wide spreading
    Bloom Time: June - July
    Bloom Color: White
    Flower/Fruit: Clusters of fragrant, tiny star shaped white flowers, followed by purplish black, berry-like fruits.
    Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade
    Fall Color: yellow, orange and red
    Drought Tolerance: High
    Water: Medium to wet
    Maintenance: High; It can be pruned back hard to keep it in bounds.
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Prefers moist soils, but is drought tolerant. Does well in acidic or alkaline soils.
    Culture: Spreads by root suckers to form colonies. Prune out dead or weakened stems in early spring.
    Uses: Best when massed in naturalized areas where suckering spread is acceptable. Also effective in shrub borders, roadside plantings, wet or low areas, as a screen or as part of a native plant garden.
    Sowing Sambucus canadensis Seeds:
    The seeds of American Elderberry are very small.
    Elderberry
    seed need a warm spell then a cold spell in order to mature the embryo and reduce the seed coat.
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Pour Hot water over seed. Soak for 24 hours.
    Stratify: Warm 60 Days, then Cold 120 days, 40 Degrees F in a moist medium.
    Germination: Sow 1/16” deep

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4


    Japanese Honeysuckle Vine, Lonicera Japonica:
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    Fragrant Flowering Vine or Ground Cover, Long Blooming Period, Attracts Birds, Hummingbirds and Butterflies, Fast Growth, Hardy, Drought, Salt and Urban Tolerant, Ornamental Fruit, Wildlife food
    Japanese Honeysuckle is an extremely vigorous twining and trailing woody vine which typically grows 15-30'. It is perhaps the most popular of the Honeysuckles that are used as ground covers. The leaves are in pairs opposite each other along the stem and are deciduous in cold climates, evergreen in milder areas. They are elliptic to oval, 2-3 inches long and half as wide. In northern areas leaves turn a bronze or purple in the fall.
    The flowers are about 1.5 inches long, tubular with two widely spreading lips, and borne in pairs. Japanese honeysuckle blooms throughout the entire growing season. The flowers start out white, sometimes tinged with purple, and age to yellow in their second day. The flowers are extremely fragrant, appearing from May to frost and give way to black berries which mature in late summer to fall. The fruits are dark blue black berries about 0.25 inches in diameter.
    Japanese Honeysuckle can be grown as a quick groundcover or planted on banks for erosion control. It grows quickly on a trellis or fence, to provide a sweetly-fragrant screen for privacy or shade. The flowers attract hummingbirds and bees, and the fruits are relished by many kinds of song birds. It has become an important food item for white-tailed deer in the eastern US.
    Other Names: Japanese Honeysuckle, Hall's Honeysuckle, Gold-and-Silver Flower, Lonicera Halliana
    Zone: 4 to 9
    Growth rate: Fast
    Plant Type: Vine or Ground Cover
    Family: Caprifoliaceae
    Native Range: Eastern Asia
    Height: 15 to 30 feet
    Spread: 3 to 6 feet
    Shape: Twining, climbing vine or trailing groundcover
    Bloom Time: May - October
    Bloom Color: White maturing to yellow
    Flower/Fruit: Small sweetly scented double-tongued flowers opening white and fading to yellow. Small black fruit.
    Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade
    Fall Color: Evergreen, semi evergreen or deciduous (bronze or purple), depending on the climate.
    Drought Tolerance: Moderate-High
    Water: Dry to Medium
    Maintenance: Medium
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Easily grown in average, dry to medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerates drought as well as soggy soils. Adapts to wide range of soils. Prefers moist, loamy soils.
    Culture: When used as a ground cover, 2-3 plants per square yard should be sufficient, and plants may be cut back hard (i.e., sheared close to the ground with an elevated lawn mower) in late winter to control growth and to remove dead undergrowth.
    Uses: May be grown on trellises or fences (especially in areas near porches or patios where its fragrance may be enjoyed). Excellent for screening. Also effective when grown without support as a ground cover, particularly for erosion control on banks or slopes. Because of its vigorous growing habit, it is best to segregate this vine in areas where it cannot easily attach to and climb on nearby shrubs or trees or perennials.
    Special Note: This species has demonstrated an invasive tendency in Connecticut, meaning it may escape from cultivation and naturalize in minimally managed areas.
    Sowing Lonicera japonica Seeds:
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water 24 Hours
    Stratify: Cold 60 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium (Not Wet).
    Germination: Sow 1/16”, Keep Moist, (Not Wet).

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4

    Black Mulberry, Morus nigra:
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    Hardy, Adaptable, Edible Fruit, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food, Long Lived, Shade Tree, Drought, Salt and Wind Tolerant, Bonsai
    The Black Mulberry is an ornamental as well as a fruit bearing tree. It has a crooked, wide-spreading habit; dark red, purple or black fruit, at 1 inch, the largest of the genus.
    The Black Mulberry is a medium sized deciduous tree usually only to 20 to 30 feet, but can reach 70 feet. Trees are known to be very long lived and can bear fruit for several hundred years. Mulberry trees are either dioecious or monoecious and sometimes will change from one sex to another. The flowers are held on short, green, pendulous, nondescript catkins that appear in the axils of the current season's growth and on spurs on older wood. They are wind pollinated and some cultivars will set fruit without any pollination. Cross-pollination is not necessary. Mulberries prefer deep, rich soils, but they will tolerate thin gravelly soil, rocky slopes, dry sites and other difficult areas, such as wet or alkaline soils. For this reason, they can be used for erosion control. They produce reliably in frost pockets and exposed areas. Mulberries need full sun, but otherwise, are one of the least "fussy" of the fruit trees.
    Although they appear so, fruits are not true berries but an aggregate. The berry-like fruit have a unique tart-sweet taste. The Black Mulberry is generally considered the best tasting of the various Mulberry species. The berries can be eaten out of hand or used in any way that other berries are used, such as in pies, tarts, puddings or sweetened and pureed as a sauce. Slightly unripe fruits are best for making pies and tarts. Mulberries blend well with other fruits, especially pears and apples. They can also be made into wine and make an excellent dried fruit, especially the black varieties. Birds are also attracted to the fruits in large numbers; in fact, some people plant mulberries near their cherry trees, since the birds are reputed to enjoy the Mulberries even more.
    Other Names: Black Mulberry
    Zone: 6 to 10
    Hardiness: Trees are hardy to about 10-20F (it varies tree to tree).
    Growth Rate: Slow to Moderate
    Plant Type: Medium sized deciduous fruiting tree
    Family: Moraceae
    Native Range: Western Asia. It has been cultivated in Europe for hundreds of years.
    Height: 20 to 30 feet
    Spread: 20 feet
    Shape: Variable in form, including drooping and pyramidal
    Bloom Time: Early spring
    Bloom Color: Green, white
    Flower/Fruit: Male and female catkins are 1 to 3 inches long, the male flowers being narrower. Dark red, purple, or black fruit to 1 inch
    Sun: Full Sun
    Fall Color: Yellow
    Drought Tolerance: Mildly drought tolerant, but water should be provided during long dry spells.
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Low
    Site Requirements/ Soil Tolerances: Trees are fairly adaptable, but grow well in deep, moist soils. Fertilization is generally unnecessary. Mulberries need full sun and also adequate space. The distance between trees should be at least 15 feet. The trees should not be planted near a sidewalk. The fallen fruit will not only stain the walkway, but are likely to be tracked indoors. The trees are quite wind resistant.
    Culture: A mulberry tree can be kept to a tidy form by developing a set of main branches. It is not advisable to prune the trees heavily since the plant is inclined to bleed at the cuts. Cuts of more than two inches in diameter generally do not heal and should be avoided at all cost. The bleeding will be less severe if the tree is pruned while it is dormant.
    Uses: Fruits are eaten fresh or can be used just like any berry.
    Harvest Time: July through September.
    For more information on Mulberries please try the following link:
    http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/mulberry.html
    Sowing Morus nigra Seeds:

    The seeds of Black Mulberry are very small.
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours
    Stratify: Cold 60 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.
    Germination: Surface sow indoors. Requires light for germination.

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4

    American Beautyberry, Callicarpa americana:
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Easy to Grow, Fast Growth, Showy Ornamental Fruit, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food/Shelter
    American Beautyberry is noted for its many seasons of color. It is an outstanding multiple stemmed deciduous shrub that grows 6 to 8 feet tall and usually just as wide with a loose, open form and outward pointing branches. In springtime, tiny pink to lilac flowers appear. These are held in clusters called cymes that arise from the leaf axils (where the leaf joins the stem). By autumn the flowers give rise to sweet berrylike 1/4 inch drupes in striking metallic shades of magenta and violet in the fall. The beautyberries are packed tightly together in clusters that encircle the stem. These fruits remain attractive for a long time, persisting after the leaves have fallen. Beautyberry is relatively disease and pest free and is a very attractive addition to the home flower beds or yard. It prefers a sunny location for best fruiting.
    The fruits of American Beautyberry are an important food source for many species of birds including bobwhite quails, mockingbirds, robins, towhees, and brown thrashers. Animals that eat the fruit include armadillos, raccoons, wood rats, gray foxes, opossums, and white-tailed deer. The colorful long-lasting fruits provide food for birds and animals well into the winter months when other food sources are unavailable.
    History
    The roots, leaves and branches of the American Beautyberry were used by the Alabama, Choctaw, Creek, Koasati, Seminole and other Native American tribes for various medicinal purposes. The roots, leaves and branches were made into a decoction that was used in sweat baths to treat both malarial fevers and rheumatism. The boiled plant parts were poured into a big pan that was placed near the patient inside a sweathouse. A similar decoction of the roots was used to treat dizziness and stomachaches. The roots of Callicarpa americana were boiled with roots from Rubus spp. to make an infusion to treat dysentery. The roots and berries were boiled and drunk to treat colic. The bark from the stems and roots was used to treat itchy skin. A tea from the root bark was taken to treat urine retention or “urine stopped-up sickness.”
    Other Names: Beauty Berry, Beautyberry (Callicarpa means “beautyberry”), French Mulberry, American Mulberry, Wild Goose’s Berries
    Zone: 6 to 10
    Growth Rate: Fast
    Plant Type: Deciduous ornamental shrub
    Family: Lamiaceae
    Native Range: Southeastern United States
    Height: 3 to 6 feet
    Spread: 3 to 6 feet
    Shape: Loose, open form and outward pointing branches.
    Bloom Time: June - August
    Bloom Color: Lavender, pink
    Flower/Fruit: Tiny lilac flowers followed by clusters of glossy, iridescent-purple fruit.
    Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade
    Fall Color: Non Showy yellow-green
    Drought Tolerance: Moderate to High
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Medium
    Site Requirements/ Soil Tolerances: This plant prefers the soil of its natural forest floor habitat, a moist clay or sand enriched with organic matter. It will fruit most abundantly in full sun but may be grown in light shade. The plant needs minimal care once its roots are established.
    Culture: Beautyberry plants can produce abundant volunteers from the many seeds that drop to the soil. The flowers are produced on new growth, so prune plants after the fruits are gone to increase the next year’s growth and berry production. The plants can take a hard pruning and may be pruned to the ground level in the winter if desired.
    Uses: Use beautyberry for massing or individually in woodland plantings. Great for low maintenance natural gardens where it contributes year round beauty and food for wildlife. Spring flowers and beautiful fall fruit make this an attractive landscape plant. Use it in full sun where foliage will take on a not unattractive yellow-green color that combines interestingly with the brilliant violet fruits. Beautyberry plants are said to bear more fruit if several are planted together.
    Sowing Callicarpa americana Seeds:
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water for 24 hours
    Stratify: Cold 0-90 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.
    Germination: Sow 1/16” Deep

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4

    Virginia Creeper Vine, Parthenocissus quinquefolia:
    [​IMG][​IMG]


    Brilliant Red Fall Colors, Hardy, Adaptable, Easy to Grow, Bonsai, Attracts Birds, Showy Fruit, Cold, Heat, Drought, Salt and Wind Tolerant
    Virginia Creeper is a deciduous vine that is native to eastern and central North America. It grows 30 to 50 feet climbing by tendrils and adhering to flat surfaces.Flowers are small greenish-white, appearing in clusters. Flowers are followed by dark blue berries. The berries are poisonous to humans but are relished by birds and other wildlife. Leaves are compound palmate with 5-6 leaflets and 6 inches long. Leaves emerge purple in spring, turning a dark green by summer. In Autumn leaves get quite showy, turning purple to flaming red.
    Virginia Creeper tolerates any soil or sun exposure and practically anything else one can throw at it. A good plant for rapidly covering large structures, it can function as a ground cover as well as a high climbing vine.
    Other Names: Virginia Creeper, Woodbine, American Ivy, Five Leaved Ivy
    Zone: 5 to 9
    Growth Rate: Fast
    Plant Type: Deciduous Climbing Vine
    Family: Vitaceae
    Native Range: Eastern United States to Mexico
    Height: 30 to 50 feet
    Spread: 5 to 10 feet
    Bloom Time: June
    Bloom Color: Greenish white
    Flower/Fruit: Inconspicuous flowers, waxy blue-black berries
    Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade
    Fall Color: Brilliant purple to red
    Drought Tolerance: High
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Medium
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerates full shade and a wide range of soil and environmental conditions.
    Uses: Bonsai. Walls, trellises, arbors or fences. May also be grown on the ground as a ground cover.
    Sowing Parthenocissus quinquefolia Seeds:
    Virginia Creeper seeds possess a thick, impermeable seed-coat which prevents or significantly retards germination.
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water 24 Hours
    Stratify: Cold 60 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.
    Germination: Sow 1/4” Deep

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4


    Desert Willow, Chilopsis linearis:
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Fast Growing, Showy Long Blooming Fragrant Flowers, Attracts Birds, Hummingbirds and Butterflies, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Street Tree, Hedge/Screen, Cold, Heat, Drought and Urban Tolerant
    If you are looking for a pretty, fast growing, shrub or small tree for a drought tolerant garden with great big dramatic flowers put Sweet Desert Willow on your planting list. Native to Southwest U.S. and Northern Mexico, Desert Willow is a small, deciduous tree or shrub, often with a leaning, twisting trunk and open, spreading crown, growing 15 to 40 feet. It has narrow, bright green, willow-like leaves and colorful, trumpet shaped flowers. Leaves are both opposite and alternate, 4 to 12 inches long and 1/3 inch wide. The blossom is funnel-shaped, Catalpa-like, 1 to 1 1/2 inches long, spreading at the opening into 5 ruffled, petal-like lobes. Flower colors range from white to purple, often with white or yellow and purple streaks within the throat. The flowers are borne in terminal racemes and continually flowers over a 5 month period. By early autumn, the violet-scented flowers, which appear after summer rains, are replaced by slender, long dangling, seedpods with cottony down, 6 to 10 inches long. Birds will eat the seeds and bees and hummingbirds are attracted to the flowers. During the cold season, Desert Willow will shed its leaves for up to six months. In summer, few trees can rival the beauty of flowering Desert Willow.
    Named for its resemblance to willows, it is not actually a true willow tree. This popular ornamental tree is actually related to Catalpa trees. Its exotic-looking blooms, rapid growth, drought tolerance and ease of maintenance have made it a sought after plant within its range. Adapted to desert washes, it does best with just enough water to keep it blooming and healthily green through the warm months. They look dramatic planted in rows, try them along a driveway or against a back fence in the landscape. Make sure you can see them from your window and enjoy the flowers.
    Leaf: Alternate and opposite or whorled, linear, often slightly curved, 3 to 5 inches long, 1/4 to 3/8 inches wide, green above.
    Flower: Attractive, bell shaped, 1 inch long, white to pale lavender with purple and yellow streaks inside throat, appear in long clusters at the ends of twigs in late spring and summer.
    Fruit: Long thin slightly twisted brown capsule, 6 to 12 inches long, containing numerous fluffy, winged seeds, ripen in fall.
    Twig: Slender, initially green turning gray-brown, buds are very small.
    Bark: Gray-brown with lighter colored cracks and splits, later develops shallow furrows and becomes scaly.
    Form: Large shrub to small tree, reaches heights of 30 feet, often with a twisted crown.
    Zone: 7 to 11 (Hardy to -3 degrees Fahrenheit)
    Growth Rate: Fast to Moderate
    Plant Type: Deciduous shrub or tree
    Family: Bignoniaceae
    Native Range: North America
    Height: 14 to 40 feet
    Spread: 10 to 20 feet
    Shape: Rounded, Spreading
    Bloom Time: Spring thru Fall
    Sun: Full Sun
    Fall Color: None
    Drought Tolerance: High. Can survive on as little as 10 inches a year of rainfall.
    Water: Low
    Maintenance: Low
    Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Plant Desert Willow tree in full sun or partial shade. It will tolerate various soil conditions but does best in soil that drains well.Too much water will cause Desert Willow to get root rot, so allow the soil to dry out completely before watering again, or amend the planting hole with fast draining soil.
    Culture: For the first year, water Desert Willow deeply every five to seven days. Water established Desert Willow trees every two weeks in the summer and every month in the winter. Prune in spring just as leaves emerge to remove winter damage. To maintain a single trunk, prune only the lowest limbs every spring until the tree is as tall as you want it.
    Uses: Container or above-ground planter; recommended for buffer strips around parking lots or
    for median strip plantings in the highway; near a deck or patio; reclamation plant; specimen.
    Desert Willow can be left as a shrub, or trained into a tree with several trunks. They take well to trimming so they can also be used as hedges.
    Sowing Chilopsis linearis Seeds:
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water for 24 hours
    Stratify: None
    Germination: Sow 1/4” Deep, Keep Moist, (Not wet).

    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4


    Crape Myrtle, Lagerstroemia indica:
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Fast Growing, Showy Flowering Shrub/Tree, Exfoliating Bark, Fall Color, Bonsai, Drought Tolerant
    Crape Myrtle is a deciduous, upright, spreading, multi-stemmed shrub. Features dark green foliage turning dull reddish-orange in fall, grayish-brown bark which exfoliates with age and terminal. Beautiful, inflorescence white, pink, red, or lavender flowers that bloom on 6 to 12 inch long panicles in mid-June and last up to 120 days. Flowers give way to round seed capsules which often persist well into winter.
    From the showy flowers to the superb bark and foliage, the Crape Myrtle is a favorite landscape plant throughout the South. Crape Myrtles are found as far north as Baltimore, Maryland, but they are better suited for warmer regions of the country. In the North winter injury is a problem and plants will grow much smaller. It must have full sun or powdery mildew will become a problem.
    Crape Myrtles are a valuable landscape plant that can be used as a shrub or small tree, ranging in size from 18 inches to over 25 feet. As an asset to almost any landscape, the Crape Myrtle is a very beautiful specimen shrub or tree, often used in groups under planted with a ground cover. The dark green foliage contrasts the gray to tan shades of the handsome bark. Crape Myrtle can be used as hedges, screens, or in masses. Planted in this manner, Crape Myrtle offers a grand display of color throughout the summer months.
    Common Name: Crape Myrtle
    Zone: 6 to 9
    Growth Rate: Fast to Medium
    Plant Type: Deciduous flowering shrub or small tree
    Family: Lythraceae
    Native Range: China and Korea
    Height: 10 to 30 feet
    Spread: 15 to 25 feet
    Bloom Time: 120 days, June - September
    Bloom Color: white, pink, red, or lavender
    Flower/Fruit: Very showy 6 to 12 inch long clustered blooms (panicles). The fruits that follow are brown or black. When mature they dry and split releasing disk shaped seeds.
    Fall Color: Showy orange, red and yellow.
    Sun: Full Sun
    Water: Medium
    Maintenance: Medium
    Drought Tolerance: High
    Soil Tolerances: clay; loam; sand; acidic; alkaline; well-drained
    Site Requirements: Full Sun, well drained soil; protect from drying winds.
    General Culture: Best grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun. Does well in loamy, clay soils with good drainage. Susceptibility to winter injury. Plant in a protected location and apply a good winter mulch. Growing crape myrtles in extreme cold areas can be tricky because the above ground branches often die to the ground in winter, particularly when temperatures dip below -5 degrees F. Above ground branches are considered to be winter hardy to USDA Zone 7, whereas roots are usually but not always hardy to USDA Zone 5. Colder areas can grow these plants as woody shrubs by pruning them back to live wood in spring at the time new foliage begins to appear (in somewhat the same manner as with shrub roses). With protection, top growth will survive some winters, but will still suffer significant injury or die to the ground in harsh winters.
    Uses: Good as a specimen shrub or in groups. Quite effective as a tall screen or informal hedge. Excellent container plants or Bonsai.
    Sowing Crape Myrtle Seeds:
    The seeds of Crape Myrtle are very small.
    For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.
    Scarify: Soak in water 24 Hours
    Stratify: Cold 30 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.
    Germination: Sow indoors 1/16” or less.
    Light is beneficial in germination.
    For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please try the following link:
    http://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/INFD-7F8AJ4

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    Eggs Available Fall/Winter 2014:
    EMU EGGS: For the November 2013 season we got 27 eggs from Rose (winter 2013 - early 2014). Should have plenty available when she starts laying again this fall.

    Eggs Available this spring (2014):
    Chickens:
    Ameraucanas (not Easter Eggers) colors: Blue and Splash (black pen and lavender pen are in the works)
    Silkied Ameraucanas (the sikied gene and not a silkie cross) ..colors: Blue, Splash (working on a black pen, chocolate pen and a lavender pen which will be available later in 2014 or early 2015 depending on how they do [​IMG] )
    Black Copper Marans (bred for egg color and not to standard)
    Bresse
    Coronation Sussex

    Dark Cornish
    Dorking
    Dorking cross meat birds
    Mottled Cornish
    Orpingtons
    Turkens

    Yokohamas (assorted colors)


    Ducks and Geese:
    Sebastopol geese
    Embden geese
    Toulouse geese
    Ancona
    (available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Black East Indies (available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Blue Swedish (available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Call Duck (available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Cayuga (available on a limited basis spring 2014)
    French White Muscovy (larger than regular muscovys.. raised for meat.. available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Giant Pekins
    Golden 300 Hybrid Layer
    (ducklings from eggs will not be color sexable like their parents since this is a hybrid.. the ducklings that do hatch will be black, yellow or brown.. however they should be just as productive egg layers as their parents...available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Khaki Campbell (available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Mandarin (available on a limited basis spring 2015)
    Muscovy
    Rouen
    (available late summer to early fall 2014)
    Silkie Duck (available on a limited basis spring 2015)

    Heritage Turkey:
    Tom is a Sweetgrass, hens are Jersey Buff, Self Buff, Sweetgrass, and Bronze. Since they all freerange together the poults would be mixed (unless you get a few of the Sweetgrass X Sweetgrass eggs). One Tom with five hens. So fertility is high. LAYING NOW!



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    Clay Critters:
    Polymer clays



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    Candles:
    All are made by me.. natural vegetable waxes, beeswax and soy wax (no paraffin)




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    Soap:
    All are handmade by me.. Goat milk soap (cold or hot process)



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    Hand Painted Incense Burner Bottles:
    Handmade and painted by me.. custom painted orders on a limited basis


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    Other:
    Emu feathers ... soft body feathers (fly fisherman love these for making flies) and coarse tail feathers

    Emu egg shells .. blown out for crafting .. working on some "cut" ones (top and bottom) for making music boxes or small jewelry boxes

    Kombucha Scobys .. these are the smaller ones (Quart jar size)..

    Milk Kefir Grains will be available in about a week or so..

    Water Kefir Grains available in a few days

    Rosemary branches.. we have a GIANT rosemary plant.. so we always have rosemary available

    Feed bags for making into tote bags I have a bunch of the large "plastic" Pedigree dog food bags from my neighbor. may also have a few smaller Cat Chow bags.

    Sourdough Starter this is the "San Francisco" sourdough yeast type.. I bought extra when I got mine.. have no need for the excess right now... so this is uncontaminated by local Texas yeast since it is still in the package and unused.



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    Swaps I owe:
    all have been fulfilled!


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    Swaps owed to me:
    blue swedish eggs from dndjohnson
    mulberry starts from mlongworth


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