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Bs Peeps

I started this project in August 2014. Took the fall/winter off and resumed in spring 2015 only when weather permitted. I've not done a whole lot since, just minor things for comfort and convenience. Life sort of got in the way of populating the coop along with my fear of brooding chicks in absentia - not home all day to ensure their comfort and safety in the house (no garage, no basement). I think I've come upon a less-worrisome manner to keep newborns warm w/o fear of fire or over heating from a heat lamp. Anyway, I hope to move from 'virtual' chickens to real chickens in the very near future. Total cost came out around $300. The costliest part of the whole thing is the hardware: hinges, hasps, handles, stabilizing brackets (2 doors), hardware cloth, drip edge, and washers & screws ; and more washers & screws!

I started this project  in August 2014. Took the fall/winter off and resumed in spring 2015 only when weather permitted.  I've not done a whole lot since, just minor things for comfort and convenience. Life sort of got in the way of populating the coop along with my fear of brooding chicks in absentia - not home all day to ensure their comfort and safety in the house (no garage, no basement). I think I've come upon a less-worrisome manner to keep newborns warm w/o fear of fire or over heating from a heat lamp.  Anyway, I hope to move from 'virtual' chickens to real chickens in the very near future.  
Total cost came out around $300. The costliest part of the whole thing is the hardware: hinges, hasps, handles, stabilizing brackets (2 doors), hardware cloth, drip edge, and washers & screws ; and more washers & screws!
Bs Peeps, Oct 15, 2015

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