Brahma

Average User Rating:
4.38095/5,
  • Breed Purpose:
    Dual Purpose
    Comb:
    Pea
    Broodiness:
    Average
    Climate Tolerance:
    All Climates
    Egg Productivity:
    Medium
    Egg Size:
    Large
    Egg Color:
    Light Brown
    Breed Temperament:
    Friendly, Easily handled, Calm, Bears confinement well, Docile
    Breed Colors/Varieties:
    Light, Buff, Dark, Gold, Black, White, Blue, and Blue Columbian.
    Breed Size:
    Large Fowl
    APA/ABA Class:
    Asiatic
    fd9e5a64_011.jpeg

    There has been considerable controversy over the true origins of the Brahma breed, but appears to have developed in the US originally, from birds imported from China. They were send off from the port of Shanghai and were thus known as "Shanghai birds". Brahmas as we know them were first exported to England in December 1852, when George Burnham sent nine "Gray Shanghaes" to Queen Victoria as a gift. The Dark Brahma variety was developed by English breeders from this stock and later exported to the United States, where the Brahma was the principal meat bird from the 1850's to around 1930. Some of these birds were very big, with males weighing in at up to 18 lb and females at 13 lb.

    The Light and Dark Brahma were developed and included in the first edition of the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection in 1874 and the Buff variety was added in 1924. The Australian Poultry Association has accepted black, blue, partridge, crele and barred varieties of Brahma in addition to the standard light, dark, and buff.

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    Brahma eggs

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    Brahma chick

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    Brahma juveniles

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    Brahma hen

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    Brahma rooster

    For more about Brahmas and their owners' and breeders' experiences with this breed, see our breed discussion here:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/chicken-breed-focus-brahma.992485/
  • cd5166fa_brahma-7443-231778.jpeg 46811373_brahma-7443-653194.jpeg 2cdc243a_brahma-7443-344128.jpeg d9e88011_brahma-7443-154725.jpeg ee7d068a_P5213479.jpeg 26c0119b_P5213483.jpeg 83f72152_P5213487.jpeg 65fff94f_P5213490.jpeg 9bdea661_IMG_1533.jpeg 587626ab_108_0386.jpeg bb87c2bc_really_really_ridiculously_good_looking_by_fleabuskitty-d4n9133.jpeg e8aba35e_QDI_Buff_Brahma.jpeg a1bb424c_2252012025400x267.jpeg c75a7c25_castelli1.jpeg 932d37cc_brat2.jpeg d0a36847_april72012021.jpeg aa810f0b_april72012015georgiecloseup.jpeg f9f315a4_0629111638.jpeg 27e02725_5-2-12051.jpeg d4a78850_5-2-12013.jpeg 9cd3cd08_5-2-12026.jpeg e7cc82da_Buddy2.jpeg 3259cda8_DSCN0848.jpeg b777f6b9_brahma-7443-637619.jpeg d5e55eda_DSCF1808.jpeg af8d3e89_IMG_2047800x606.jpeg 78909722_IMG_0428.jpeg 3a55b920_P1010025.jpeg ed465daf_chickens011.jpeg 4e1a5ceb_278.jpeg e858c255_261.jpeg b1c5fd27_luke.jpeg b4f51a28_image.jpeg d008391f_IMG_0988.jpeg 4bbcb5b7_2014-06-3018.45.54.jpeg dc4ca1fd_BigBird.jpeg 87cca452_GoldenBoy.jpeg 9214126a_Sunny.jpeg e6312508_P8128612BrahmapuzzledCROP.jpeg 866d4ea1_HA318304LightBrahmacopy.jpeg 28ee5fea_P8118596LightBrahmaonnestADJ.jpeg fd9e5a64_011.jpeg f4e6da95_078.jpeg 2ec22f4c_063.jpeg 194c2b06_IMG_5780.jpeg 41fdc7b0_image.jpeg 35a4365f_0610151828a.jpeg 1208d94a_IMG_30501.jpeg ea5d25c3_FullSizeRender1.jpeg e1b76360_image.jpeg f2eef74a_th10.jpeg 10003.jpg

  • Chicken Breed Info:
    Breed Purpose:
    Dual Purpose
    Comb: Pea
    Broodiness: Average
    Climate Tolerance: All Climates

    General Egg Info:
    Egg Productivity:
    Medium
    Egg Size: Large
    Egg Color: Light Brown

    Breed Temperament:
    Friendly,Easily handled,Calm,Bears confinement well,Docile

    Breed Colors / Varieties:
    Light, Buff, Dark, Gold, Black, White, Blue,and Blue Columbian.
    Breed Details:
    I started breeding the standard Light Brahmas in spring of 2008. The Brahmas are a very friendly, docile breed. Neither one of my roosters have ever been aggressive with me. The hens are good layers of large brown eggs. So far, the Brahma chicks have been very easy to hatch, brood, and raise. This breed does very well in cold and hot weather. At around 7 weeks of age you can start to guess the genders of the chicks. At around 12 or so weeks of age you should know for sure the sexes of your chicks. The hens usually start laying around 5 months of age. My hens usually lay every other day.

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    Rooster
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    Hen
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    Egg
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    Chick
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    Adolescent
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Recent User Reviews

  1. Chick Chick McGee
    5/5,
    "I Love this breed!"
    Pros - I live in Minnesota so this breed is great for the cold weather!
    Cons - Non
    I owen 9 Buff bantam Brahmas and I love them! They are so friendly and calm!
  2. Floppy Pheasant
    5/5,
    "Beautiful Birds"
    Talha Zubair and BlackHackle like this.
  3. BReeder!
    5/5,
    "Big Friendly Giants"
    Pros - calm, large dual-purpose bird, winter hardy
    Cons - feathered feet are an issue for some (not for me), large bird that may need special accommodations (wider roost set lower to the ground, larger nesting boxes), heat may be a problem
    I have two light brahmas, and I love them! They are interesting birds with their huge body mass and feathered feet. Mine are too yound still to lay eggs but should start in a few months. I expect them to be decent year-round egg layers. They handled a few cool nights already, and seem to be a cold hardy bird. They have a ton of fluffy feathers and even feathered feet to keep warm. I do worry about the summer heat given all of the insulation these birds sport, but we have ensured they chickens will have shade and plenty of air flow in the coop during the summer.
    They are very calm birds - far more relaxed than my cuckoo maran. I have no issues keeping them with our smaller Gold-Laced Wyandotte and Spotted Sussex. They are great around my toddler too.
    Purchase Price:
    $3.00 as chicks
    Purchase Date:
    March 2018
    Talha Zubair and BlackHackle like this.

User Comments

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  1. ChickenzRCul
    Amazing nice birds, planning on getting more.
  2. tommytyler
    looking for brahmas in colorado. please help, thanks
  3. Stacey724
    I do love the Brahmas. Like others I am looking for the Giant Brahma that you commonly see on the internet. Please help. I can not seem to find them any where. If any of you have them let me know I just want some eggs to incubate. Thank you have a great day all.
    1. nightowl223
      There is no "giant Brahma." The ones you have seen are simply Brahmas. They get very large, and people videoing them will choose an angle where it makes them look even larger than they actually are.
      nightowl223, Jun 11, 2018
      Chica'sChickens and Dharmachick like this.
  4. ShalonaK
    So there has been a video going around about the GINORMOUS brahma chicken that looks like its 4ft tall. My sweet neighbor is dying to have one so I am wondering does this really happen? I want to gift her one if I can but I don't want to get her hopes up if they truly don't get that big... Can anyone help me with this?
    1. Stacey724
      If you find out where to get some let me know I am looking as well.
      Stacey724, May 16, 2018
      ShalonaK likes this.
    2. nightowl223
      There is no "ginormous Brahma." The ones you have seen are simply Brahmas. They get very large, and people videoing them will choose an angle where it makes them look even larger than they actually are.
      nightowl223, Jun 11, 2018
      ShalonaK likes this.
    3. ShalonaK
      How big are they compared to Jersey Giants?
      ShalonaK, Jun 23, 2018
  5. vllang
    What are the average weights today? I thought the Jersey Giants were the only chickens this big until today when a friend of mine got some chicks and said they were giants. My auto response was oh you got Jersey Giants. He said no they are Brahmas. I had heard of Brahmas before but never realized they were so big.
    1. djcap
      My roo's are about 12 to 13lb's and my hens are around 10lb's
      djcap, Apr 9, 2018
      Stacey724 likes this.
  6. Frostette
    I'm wanting to start a flock of Lt. Brahmas - about 10 hens and 1 rooster. This is a big difference for me as I usually prefer to have all different breeds. But this is such a beautiful bird and I thought I'd like to have hens raising their chicks (been a long time since I've done that) and be able to sell chicks. I keep reading they aren't that good at egg production. Even though I let my chickens run around the yard for awhile everyday, would I be spending more to feed them than I'm getting out of them? Maybe I should get 5 of these hens and 5 types of good egg layers........Any thoughts?
    1. elmoflim
      That’d be smart for good egg layers I recommend white leghorns. Not great on personalities typically, but great layers.
      elmoflim, Feb 11, 2018
    2. TeenageRooster's Dad
      Super sucker here but I just like to have them around.. most petish breed I think; my 4yo son lays on the grass with some scratch... takes 30s for Isaiah to be taken over by the white feathery Michelin crew... just fun to see their behavior...
      TeenageRooster's Dad, Mar 2, 2018
  7. djcap
    Blue Partridge Brahma

    I have Blue Partridge Brahma
    and they are very rare in the USA! I will be selling hatching eggs this spring!
    Takes a second to wrap your head around this....The overall color variety is called Blue Partridge Brahma. The Andalusian Blue gene that is responsible for their blue color in one mating hatches chicks in 3 different colors. Below, is how the gene works. The lighter ones are called splash and or red pyle or can be a very light blue. You will also have chicks that are black and gold/red called Gold and lastly, Blue and Gold/red are blues. It is very hard with real accuracy to tell the difference between a blue or gold blue partridge Brahma chick until they are about 3-5 weeks of age....



    How the Andalusian Blue Gene works For Black, Blue, and Splash (BBS)

    When breeding with the andalusian blue gene, one mating can give you 3 colors of chicks.

    The gene for Andalusian Blue is a WYSIWYG gene. The visible plumage color is the color of the genetics. There is no need to do test matings to find out if it is present. The gene is a dominate blue, effecting black and little effect on red. The blue gene not present is a black bird (Feathers are Black and Gold), one blue gene will change a black bird to blue ( Blue and red) where 2 blue genes will change black to a whitish bird with splashes of gray/blue/red.

    Below is the different combinations of matings between the 3 colors of BBS. The percentages are based on 100 chicks hatched.

    ➢ Gold x Gold = 100% Gold

    ➢ Gold x Blue = 50% Gold and 50% Blue

    ➢ Gold x Splash = 100% Blue

    ➢ Blue x Blue = 25% Gold, 50% Blue and 25% Splash

    ➢ Blue x Splash = 50% Blue and 50% Splash

    ➢ Splash x Splash = 100% Splash
      namztammy, samzoost, sharron and 2 others like this.
    1. View previous replies...
    2. Stacey724
      I am interested in your brahmas. Could I get some?
      Stacey724, May 16, 2018
      djcap likes this.
    3. tommytyler
      interested in 6. please contact me and thanks
      tommy
      tommytyler, Jul 9, 2018
    4. samzoost
      I'm interested in your brahmas, I was wondering if I could order one or two?
      samzoost, Jul 21, 2018
  8. djcap
    Blue Partridge Brahma

    I have Blue Partridge Brahma
    and they are very rare in the USA! I will be selling hatching eggs this spring!
    Takes a second to wrap your head around this....The overall color variety is called Blue Partridge Brahma. The Andalusian Blue gene that is responsible for their blue color in one mating hatches chicks in 3 different colors. Below, is how the gene works. The lighter ones are called splash and or red pyle or can be a very light blue. You will also have chicks that are black and gold/red called Gold and lastly, Blue and Gold/red are blues. It is very hard with real accuracy to tell the difference between a blue or gold blue partridge Brahma chick until they are about 3-5 weeks of age....



    How the Andalusian Blue Gene works For Black, Blue, and Splash (BBS)

    When breeding with the andalusian blue gene, one mating can give you 3 colors of chicks.

    The gene for Andalusian Blue is a WYSIWYG gene. The visible plumage color is the color of the genetics. There is no need to do test matings to find out if it is present. The gene is a dominate blue, effecting black and little effect on red. The blue gene not present is a black bird (Feathers are Black and Gold), one blue gene will change a black bird to blue ( Blue and red) where 2 blue genes will change black to a whitish bird with splashes of gray/blue/red.

    Below is the different combinations of matings between the 3 colors of BBS. The percentages are based on 100 chicks hatched.

    ➢ Gold x Gold = 100% Gold

    ➢ Gold x Blue = 50% Gold and 50% Blue

    ➢ Gold x Splash = 100% Blue

    ➢ Blue x Blue = 25% Gold, 50% Blue and 25% Splash

    ➢ Blue x Splash = 50% Blue and 50% Splash

    ➢ Splash x Splash = 100% Splash
      namztammy, tommytyler and Kodipie2 like this.
    1. sillyfab
      do you have hatching eggs to sell
      sillyfab, Jun 6, 2018
      djcap likes this.
    2. djcap
      yes i do
      djcap, Jun 10, 2018
    3. tommytyler
      hello im in fort collins iand i believe i spoke with you yesterday. please contact me as im interested. i believe you have my phone contact tommy.
      tommytyler, Jul 9, 2018
  9. Nutmeg15
    My pair of five-month-old Dark Brahmas are incredibly sweet and soooo pretty. The larger of the two, Clover, adores hugs and loves to fall asleep on my lap. Their feathered feet are very cute, although I have had some trouble with other hens pecking at the growing feathers until the toes bleed, and the feathers do get packed with snow and ice. They are growing very quickly, but love being handled even at their great size.
      Dharmachick, CherryHBomb and djcap like this.
  10. Alecia Davidshofer
    I meow for brahamas
      Dharmachick likes this.

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