Cornish

Average User Rating:
4/5,
  • Breed Purpose:
    Meat Bird
    Comb:
    Pea
    Broodiness:
    Average
    Climate Tolerance:
    All Climates
    Egg Productivity:
    Medium
    Egg Size:
    Medium
    Egg Color:
    Brown
    Breed Temperament:
    Friendly, Calm, Bears confinement well, Quiet
    Breed Colors/Varieties:
    Dark, Jubilee, Blue-laced and White Red laced
    Breed Size:
    Large Fowl
    700.jpg

    The Cornish breed is known variously by Indian or Cornish Game depending on country. In America it was originally always known as Indian Game, until 1905 when the American Poultry Association passed a motion to rename the breed to Cornish Indian Game. Due to the confusion the name caused by implying the breed came from India, and unpopularity of the use of Game in the name, it was eventually renamed to simply the Cornish in 1910. The Cornish is a large, stocky breed, often crossed with other breeds to enhance meat production. There are two variates, the Cornish Game and the Jubilee Cornish Game. The Cornish Game is dark blue - green in color, with brown patterning on the hens. Jubilee Cornish Game are much lighter, and less stocky than their counterparts. They are usually light wheaten in color, with light brown patterning.

    The breed was developed by Sir Walter Gilbert, 1st Baronet, around 1820 and was accepted by the American Poultry Association in 1893.

    chick.jpg
    Cornish chick

    juvie.jpg
    Cornish juvenile

    hen.jpg
    Cornish hen

    rooster.jpg
    Cornish rooster

    For more information on this breed and their owners' and breeders' experiences with them, see our breed discussion here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/chicken-breed-focus-cornish.1142033/
  • 97cf43f0_100_2784.jpeg 331a071e_image.jpeg b45f42db_cornish-31743-130877.jpeg 7834e289_cornish-31743-313298.jpeg 700.jpg chick.jpg juvie.jpg hen.jpg rooster.jpg

  • Chicken Breed Info:
    Breed Purpose:
    Meat Bird/game bird
    Comb: Pea
    Broodiness: Average
    Climate Tolerance: All Climates

    General Egg Info:
    Egg Productivity:
    Medium
    Egg Size: Medium
    Egg Color: Brown

    Breed Temperament:
    Friendly,Calm,Bears confinement well,Quiet

    Breed Colors / Varieties:
    White, Dark, and White Laced Red
    Breed Details:
    They are quiet and calm, they can also be easily approached. They are ideal for frying and are broilers. They don't eat anymore than your avg LF bird.

    [​IMG]

    Rooster
    [​IMG]

    Hen
    [​IMG]

    Egg
    [​IMG]

    Chick
    [​IMG]

    Adolescent
    [​IMG]
Hennie&Foghorn likes this.

Recent User Reviews

  1. Little Eden Farm
    5/5,
    "Love my LFWC!"
    Pros - Very friendly rooster and a joy to have. I love my Cornish. Fun and impressive birds to have.
    Cons - Can't multiply fast enough. Going for a huge flock.
    Love my LFWC. Just can't say enough about how much fun they are. Impressive to look at and the compliments don't hurt a bit. A lot of people ask if they are on steroids. Lol
    Then proceed to beg to buy some. It'll be quite a while before I have enough to share but am having high hopes. Love my Cornish.
    Purchase Date:
    2017
  2. abanjaf
    1/5,
    "Nasty Roosters!!!"
    Pros - Pretty bird, beautiful metallic sheen to feathers of the Dark Cornish Rooster.
    Cons - Extremely aggressive roosters, to both people and the chickens at the lower end of the pecking order
    I have two dark Cornish roosters that I'm selling along with some white Plymouth Rock hens. They are either going to be rehomed OR MEET THEIR MAKER!!! In the 15 years that I have owned chickens with a multitude of breeds, I HAVE NEVER HAD ROOSTERS THIS AGGRESSIVE!!! Perhaps the hens are docile and make great mothers...but I have nothing good to say about the roosters. And in reading the other reviews, I'm definitely not alone in this! They are indeed pretty with that metallic sheen on their feathers, but my compliments end there. If you are going to keep this breed, keep hens! And if you must, keep only one rooster and handle him constantly in the hopes of preventing the daily attacks that I've sustained over here.
    Overall:
    1.5
  3. jchny2000
    4/5,
    "Love them!"
    Pros - Body mass is amazing
    Cons - slower to grow. lower egg count.
    This has to be a favorite of the heritage birds for me. Beautiful, compact and so calm. Good seasonal layers. The roosters are amazing. Calm, dedicated and a really great table bird too. They do take time to mature.. but good things are worth a wait.
    This is not a high end egg producer.. be aware, more of an experienced keeper for the breed. Adults are very flock oriented and very difficult to introduce new birds.
    Overall:
    4.5

User Comments

To post comments, simply sign up and become a member!
  1. Little Eden Farm
    I have a pair of Purebred White Cornish. The breeder I bought them from got the eggs from Fat Daddy (Bill) a member in this group. They are just coming up on laying age. Have started breeding and about to get it right. She should lay anytime now. We have a cold front moving through it will probably make me wait even longer. My rooster "Hummer" is lap friendly tame but "Mrs.Hummer" is not so much. It's so exciting to finally have at least a pair of the breed that I really love. I hope those of you with Cornish will pick up posting on this thread and let's talk Cornish. I do have other chickens, geese and ducks. But always willing to learn and/or help if I can.
  2. abanjaf
    I have two dark Cornish roosters that I'm selling along with some white Plymouth Rock hens. They are either going to be rehomed OR MEET THEIR MAKER!!! In the 15 years that I have owned chickens with a multitude of breeds, I HAVE NEVER HAD ROOSTERS THIS AGGRESSIVE!!! Perhaps the hens are docile and make great mothers...but I have nothing good to say about the roosters. And in reading the other reviews, I'm definitely not alone in this! They are indeed pretty with that metallic sheen on their feathers, but my compliments end there. If you are going to keep this breed, keep hens! And if you must, keep only one rooster and handle him constantly in the hopes of preventing the daily attacks over here...
  3. jchny2000
    I have only had heritage Dark Cornish, and the roosters are passive to me. I adore them, wonderful breed. I am a small person, 5 ft tall about 100 lbs. Never had a single aggression issue with them. The thing is, when a bird breed is mass produced, you get flaws that are not bred out. That's sadly what happens with "hatchery birds". Aggression is a #1 issue! To experience the breed quality, you want a bird bred by a breeder, that wants to preserve the breed standards and quality of the breed.
    Adults will not mix in with other adult chickens without severe fights or worse.. plan your flock accordingly.
    Roosters, socialize, socialize.. etc. pick them up. carry them around.. it pays off later. Just because you plan to eat them don't ignore them. It really pays off later when that "bad day" comes. And Kudos, you gave them a good life, with lots of love before that "bad day" comes.
  4. lcertuche
    I had 12 BSL cockerels bought as chicks. They turned out human aggressive attacking us frequently. I had game chickens years ago and the roosters never attacked us but we never handled them except to move them to a new coop in the night or to butcher. My children constantly handled the BSL's however and they were not human wary like my game roosters were. I think that being the only difference in their rooster-like behaviors. I am down to one BSL cockerel for my 5 girls. He was constantly jumping on me when my back was turned but I started chasing him all over the yard waving my arms. Now every time he ruffles his feathers I will chase him. After a few minutes of this crazy dance the pullets will start following me and will even squat for me, lol. He does continue to chase DH and the kids because they run from him. I like him though because he will keep my little chihuahua away from the pullets. I saw a large chicken hawk flying over and he had all the girls up under a low bush until it left the area.
  5. Bantu
    I have Cornish hens gave me 5-6 eggs a week! They was not overly friendly but I don't like them getting under my feet. Beautiful and got along with the rest of the mixed flock. Very independent and foraged very well. I have red laced pullets coming in the spring.
  6. coop410silkies
    I hear you ducks. I had a bunch of SS roosters who roamed in packs that attacked me wherever I went.out. Like you I carried a fishing net whenever I went out to feed or manage the coops, and eventually I started netting them just to gain some respect. I received two serious injuries, I could not believe how hard they can hit.. These roosters were different lines of the same breed. I bought a pellet pistol, shot them in the head, and stewed them, all but the two who have yet to attack me. On the other hand, my 12 LS roosters would die of a heart attack before they'd attack a human. For that matter, not one of my 3 RIR roosters is human aggressive. You just never know, but when your roosters are bad, your life gets miserable, that is for sure.
  7. cmohlin89
    I've been searching for 2 large fowl cornish hens, any chance you're located near North East Ohio and have any available?
  8. rachelsflock
    My vote: Eat the birdies, at least the males. You feed them and bring them water and shelter and give them girls. You probably even worry about them when they're sick or injured and may even provide some sort of medical care. Attacking you is a stupid move and chicken is delicious. They'd understand. Life is too short for males that are jerks. :)
      Taliasun likes this.
  9. ducks4you
    I bought them from McMurray. I have owned them for over a year now, and I am down to two roosters, since I butcher my birds. Perhaps you may think that I am cruel to my animals, but this is not the case. When I first bought a clutch of chicks at an auction I bought 6 RIR's. By the time I discovered (new to chickens) that only one was a hen, I was fighting off the other 5 young roosters who would go after me when I fed them. It took my two dogs to help me round them up for sale. The RIR hens are not much sweeter, so I looked for a new breed.
    I only have to pecked once near my face to recognize that when a rooster chases you and crouches, he intends to strike at your face. Perhaps by smacking near them with a horsewhip I encourated their protective instincts, but I have to use a fishing net when I feed the flock, and every other week one of the two of my remaining roosters goes after me, their feeder and caretaker. When it's time to clean the coop, I net them and put them in a dog crate in the run so that they will leave me alone.
    I am nearly 60yo and I have owned many different kinds of animals. Although you cannot assume that every Quarter Horse is docile, or that every German Shepherd is vicious, roosters run on hormones. When I owned EE roosters I never had this problem and could easily come and go in the run. Now, I watch my back.
    They are a tasty breed, but perhaps I should have bought hens, instead. You are foolish to assume that a rooster won't go after a human, but I guess you will need to experience that before you
  10. Trefoil
    I didn't see where the reviewer said his roosters were aggressive amongst themselves. If your experience has been different, feel free to state so, but you are basing your review on his using different criteria, which make it meaningless.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: