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  1. CindyinSD

    Thoughts and best practices .. older hens

    Wrong Cindy answering ;) , but I did add a bunch of half-grown pullets to my hens last summer. They were two groups, each with its own tractor coop, moving around the upper (non-flooded) pasture in poultry netting paddocks. I got tired of setting up two paddocks every time I moved them and one...
  2. CindyinSD

    Thoughts and best practices .. older hens

    I can see why it’s hard, particularly if you have only a few birds. When you have many, it’s not personal. Still (to me) the unrivaled most unpleasant of chores, but not personal.
  3. CindyinSD

    Thoughts and best practices .. older hens

    Yes, I’m hoping to practice on some Tom turkeys I need to slaughter—if it’ll stay warmish for a few days. I might take the opportunity to cull a couple roosters at the same time. Great point!
  4. CindyinSD

    Thoughts and best practices .. older hens

    I’m planning an experiment in caponizing and poulardizing for my meat birds this year. Caponization is the castrating of a cockerel at the weight of around 1-2 lbs. Poulardization is the sterilization of a pullet at around the age of 14-16 weeks. This allows the bird to grow a little bit larger...
  5. CindyinSD

    Thoughts and best practices .. older hens

    Excellent answer! Good sense and well balanced. I know of a guy who offered his spent hens on Craig’s List and a “crazy chicken lady” (his words) came and picked them up—loaded them into the back of her aging SUV, no boxes, no tarps on the floor... and drove away. I visualize animal control...
  6. CindyinSD

    Thoughts and best practices .. older hens

    1. You can’t keep all your old hens once their egg production dropped off (unless you can and want to continue feeding them with little return). You can advertise them free to anyone who’ll come and get them (I’m told people actually do answer such ads 🤷‍♀️) or you can slaughter them and cook...
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