☆Post Prolapse Care- need advice ☆

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Louise Waffles, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. Louise Waffles

    Louise Waffles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a hen that prolapsed two days ago. I put everthing back where it belonged, and have her in a crate inside. I'n keeping her covered all but a couple hours a day, removing her cover so she can eat & drink. How long should Indo this? How many hours of light CAN she have a day? She lays extra large eggs, and when cleaning her up, I found broken egg shells stuck to her. She seems in pain when evacuating, making sad little clucking noises. She's eating soft oatmeal sprinkled with layer feed and I have her on Pennchlor 64, which is the only antibiotic I have. Anything else I should be doing? Should she have more light?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    The information I have read states that placing them in a dark room or covered cage for 16 hours overnight, and they can be in light for 8 hours a day. It needs to be done until they stop laying which may take several days. I would probably do it a bit longer to make sure she has stopped. When I have had a broody hen for instance who has left her young, or been broken from being broody, they tend to start laying in about 2 weeks afterward. So that may be a good window to heal if she isn't laying for a couple of weeks.
    Another recommendation for helping to stop laying is to decrease the amount of protein or feed given daily.
    Did she have any tissue that was dark or looked necrotic when you pushed it back inside, or was it all pink or red?
     
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  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    X2, that's what I do. Dark room and much less feed.
     
  4. Louise Waffles

    Louise Waffles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It was all pink-red. Nothing looked necrotic the first time. The second time, later that day, it looked a little scabby, maybe. Nothing smelled foul, no weird looking fluids. I put some triple antibiotic & betadine on her and put everything back. That night, I wrapped her bottom with a maxi pad on some vet wrap. Her poo was very runny...so I thoughy ABSORBENT! The next morning, I remobed it and eveything has stayed in place since. Initially, her vent was all stretched out looking, but it has since shrunken back to a normal size. I'm giving her daily epsom salt soaks followed by a blow dry. I will put her outside for 8 hrs tomorrow in her own run. I'm putting about a cup of oatmeal with some greens, but I notice she's on the thin side, which concerns me.
    She's the third leghorn that's had reproductive issues. The first two died from them. Is this something this breed is prone to? None of my other breeds have had any of these problems....
     
  5. Louise Waffles

    Louise Waffles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Update: I did a little investigation. That membrane inside the vent seems unhealthy. It feels gritty, and is not pinkish reddish. It looks more a gray brown. It's a mess in there. She's been on antibiotics. Will her body naturally take care of this?
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Yes, birds who are super layers will be prone to prolapse. It also could be genetic with your particular hens, perhaps from the same parents or line. I would probably continue with the daily or more often soaks, just to her bottom. This sounds gross, but you may want to take a thin rag and gently rub the vent opening. If it prolapses again, you can try to scub any dark tissue down to pink (bleeding a little is normal?) There is always a chance that she may prolapse a great deal more tissue which is usually a reason for euthaniasia. Many hens with prolapse do not live, if there is tissue damage. I hope you are able to save her.
     
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  7. Louise Waffles

    Louise Waffles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    @Eggcessive, thank you so much for all of your advice. I am going to do my best for her, and I assure you, at this point I am so far past being grossed out by having to do this kind of thing. Haha.
    Loading my sink with an epsom salt bath, washcloths and all sorts of first aid at the ready. Again, thank you.
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    You're welcome. Your posts can help other people down the road when the same thing happens. I hope things turn out well. Many times a prolapse can happen again later.
     
  9. Louise Waffles

    Louise Waffles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found my hen on her side in her crate. She was breathing heavily and straining as if to lay and egg or poo, and I saw she had prolapsed some tissue. I used coconut oil on my finger to put it back, and held it in with the flat of my hand. After about 2 minutes she relaxed, and lowered herself to her side on the bathroom floor. She fell asleep. I didn't expect her to make it, but still...
    I did everything I thought would help,bottom soaks and extra warmth, a cozy, clean crate, antibiotics, fresh fruits and veggies, lots of water. Still, I feel like I did something wrong, neglected to do something I should have, just....GUILT. I'm crying my eyes out.
    And this on a Sunday, with no vet available to euthanize, and anyway I don't have two rusty dimes to rub together until Wednesday. I have never put anything out of its misery in my life, and don't own a hatchet anyway.
    I feel like crap.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Sorry that you are dealing with this. At least you have given her all of the chances to get better. Most oldtimers just put these chickens down, so don't beat yourself up. Do you have a family member, friend, or neighbor who hunts or would feel comfortable putting her down for you? It only takes a sharp knife to slit the neck at the jugular, and they bleed out quickly. It is never easy to end a life, but I feel that if I had tried my best to help one, and they are suffering, it is my duty to put them down. My husband used ro have ro handle those things, but when he was gone once, I had ro do it myself. Now, since many of my chickens are getting older, and having health issues, I just do it myself as kind of a gift to them for their years of service.
     
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