⭐ End of the month partay

TheDawg

Formerly KDOGG331
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
Jan 18, 2008
64,709
240,399
1,836
Massachusetts
I’m a dz pgs behind. Call me when you’re done talking about spiders.
How about pics of a cute chicken? 😉🤣
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Or maybe a funny scene I saw last week and forgot to share? 😂🤣🙈 the second part especially 😂🤣
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NanaKat

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Feb 28, 2009
9,069
13,055
937
Meeker, Ok 20+chicken years
End of the Trail
View attachment 2488770
I got this in the 1960s. As far as I know, it was not new when I got it.

Your piece may be one of a pair of bookends patterned after a sculpture by James Earle Fraser. He sculpted the original "the end of the trail" statue in 1894. The subject depicts a tired Indian on his exhausted horse ... based on a statement made by an old trapper that the Indians would be pushed to the Pacific Ocean. The main subject is the embodiment of the suffering and exhaustion of the American Indian people as they were driven from their native lands.
A large plaster version of the work was displayed at the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco and was awarded a gold medal. About 1918 Fraser began selling two different sizes of the sculpture in bronze. The subject has been copied on paintings, pottery, and many sculptors have attempted to capture the subject.
Oklahoma City has had the original plaster sculpture on exhibit at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum since 1968. It was moved from Visalia, California and restored.
 

R2elk

Magical, perfect creature
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
32,042
155,456
1,641
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
My Coop
Your piece may be one of a pair of bookends patterned after a sculpture by James Earle Fraser. He sculpted the original "the end of the trail" statue in 1894. The subject depicts a tired Indian on his exhausted horse ... based on a statement made by an old trapper that the Indians would be pushed to the Pacific Ocean. The main subject is the embodiment of the suffering and exhaustion of the American Indian people as they were driven from their native lands.
A large plaster version of the work was displayed at the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco and was awarded a gold medal. About 1918 Fraser began selling two different sizes of the sculpture in bronze. The subject has been copied on paintings, pottery, and many sculptors have attempted to capture the subject.
Oklahoma City has had the original plaster sculpture on exhibit at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum since 1968. It was moved from Visalia, California and restored.
Yes, but I only ever had one. I believe that mine came from a garage sale but they didn't call them garage sales back then.
 

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