1 Hen Dead Another Real Close To Death Help Asap!!!!!!!UPDATE 6:24PM

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Hambone, Jan 1, 2010.

  1. Hambone

    Hambone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2009
    Union, KY
    I have a bad pecking problem. I had to kill one hen that was bad off. Another with a bad open wound on its leg is going to have to be put down. The others have bad wounds under their wings. Help they are eating each other. It is vary sad to see. I have never witnessed this type of thing before. I feel really bad killing the one hen yesterday.

    SOMEONE TELL ME WHAT I CAN ADD TO THE WATER TO HELP THE OPEN WOUNDS.

    I attempted to put blinders on them. I could only catch 2 of them. I am going back out to catch them on the roost to fit the others with blinders. If I can get them all fitted with the blinders I know it will stop the pecking problem.

    HELP ME WITH ANTIBIOTICS WHAT SHOULD I GIVE THEM

    I heard I could put vinigar in the water to help the open wounds. I am going to try to put neosporin on them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2010
  2. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

    Aug 11, 2009
    Taunton, MA
    DONT PUT ANY-MORE DOWN. Chickens are amazing healers. Your experiencing cannibalism real bad. I think its too late to put any thing in the water. I would seperate them (all) in a dry cage with shavings. remember DRY, so no infections start.
    Bye the time they heal, post again and we'll find a way to re-intoduce them with-out this problem.
    -mark
     
  3. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Orange County, NY
    What is causing this? Addressing this may help to speed up the process of healing
     
  4. chookchick

    chookchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Olympia WA
    Could you tell us more about the situation you have--
    How many chickens?
    What is their diet?
    Do you use added light in the coop?
    How big is their run and coop?
    Hopefully we can help you figure out a solution.
     
  5. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

    Aug 11, 2009
    Taunton, MA
    First, i think we have to heal these guys up.
     
  6. Hambone

    Hambone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2009
    Union, KY
    thanks will post later
     
  7. Hambone

    Hambone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2009
    Union, KY
    All 5 of my hens are now fitted with pinless peepers. I got them in the roost. I coated the open wounds with neosporin and some bag balm. I hope they heal. One is real bad. I will watch her and see if her leg heals. I hate seeing my animals like that. The pecking will stop now. I read good things about the peepers. I should of put them on sooners. I just didn't expect to see open wounds like that.


    I have never had chickens but I think they are pecking b/c they are kept in the tractor 24/7 verses being able to free range. You can see my tractor on my page and see for your self. I think that is the root problem. I also think they may not be getting enough protein. That could be why they are eatting each others feathers. Which led to pecking at each others open wounds. I tried switching to a 24 percent protein feed and the problem continued. I think the reason they are pecking each other all stems from not free ranging. I believe bordom also added to the problem which would also be solved by free ranging daily. I should of build a house instead of the tractor and let them run daily. I have learned what I have done wrong and will fix the problem once they are healed up. I wish I would never of built the tractor and built a small shed with no run. I also do not own a roo.

    SHOULD I PUT ANYTHING IN THE WATER TO HELP WITH THE HEALING??

    SHOULD I FEED THEM CAT FOOD TO HELP WITH ALL THE FEATHER LOSS??
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2010
  8. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

    Aug 11, 2009
    Taunton, MA
    Cannibalism is prevalent among chickens of all ages and can become a serious problem if not corrected early. The problem is most severe when birds are housed in close confinement. In most cases it is a vice that progresses from a minor stimulus and soon becomes a severe problem.

    Many causes are thought to initiate the problem but it is not understood why it is uncontrollable in some cases but never becomes a problem in other situations. Cannibalism may start as toe picking in baby chicks; feather picking in growing birds; or head, tail and vent picking in older birds. The early symptoms of a cannibalism problem may be difficult to detect. It is necessary that the poultry man be on constant guard to detect any aggressive behavior and take necessary management changes before the problem progresses into a severe case of cannibalism.

    Causes that can result in cannibalism include:

    •High density of birds within a confined area,
    •Brooding chicks at temperatures that are too warm,
    •Small or weak chicks, especially those having oddly colored down or feathers,
    •Exposing birds to light that is too intense or having a color that induces aggression,
    •Restriction of feed or water intake,
    •Feeding a diet with a deficiency of salt or sulfur-containing amino acids (protein),
    •Allowing dead birds to remain exposed to the flock,
    •Lack of or absence of properly designed nest boxes.
    Regardless of the cause, some method of preventing this vice must be used. The most common procedure to reduce cannibalism is to debeak the birds. Birds grown in houses with very low light intensity may not require debeaking. Those grown in houses receiving normal daylight should be debeaked at the hatchery or within the first two weeks after hatching. This helps reduce the incidence of feather picking that often develops into a severe case of cannibalism.

    A special method of hot debeaking has been developed for debeaking broiler chicks at one day of age. Rather than severing or cutting the beak, a hot blade is used to burn an area near the tip of the upper beak (egg tooth). The procedure is designed to leave a thin base to the tip of the upper beak. This makes it easier for the chick to eat without having a sensitive, raw beak. The tip of the upper beak gradually drops off without apparent injury to the chick, thus leaving a shortened upper beak and a normal lower mandible.

    Reducing the mortality is a primary concern that responds well to adequate floor space. Birds should not be crowded but instead, provide sufficient room so that weaker birds can escape from those that are more aggressive. Reducing the amount of floor space usually results in increased mortality and reduced growth rate. Not only is there a monetary loss involving the cost of the chick, but the value of the feed, labor, and other items necessary to grow a chick until the time of death is a direct loss. There is also the lost profit that could have been earned if the dead birds had lived until market or egg production age.
     
  9. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    HELP ME WITH ANTIBIOTICS WHAT SHOULD I GIVE THEM

    Are the wounds infected (nasty smelling/pus/red lines on skin or swelling around wounds)? If not, don't worry with antibiotics.


    SOMEONE TELL ME WHAT I CAN ADD TO THE WATER TO HELP THE OPEN WOUNDS.

    Clean with water boiled for ten minutes with enuogh betadine in it to make it look like weak tea. If you do not have betadine then 50/50 water to hydrogen peroxide for initial cleaning (don't continue with peroxide as it will harm good tissue). A boiled spray bottle (get as clean as possible) can be useful to irrigate the wounds. If you have sterile cotton pads to daub excess that helps. You can apply plain neosporin to wounds that aren't particularly deep. Do not overdo it with the betadine as too strong a solution has a drying effect on tissue.

    As has been mentioned, these guys can heal up pretty fast. I'd separate them all and observe them closely to make sure they are'nt picking on their own wounds.

    I'd give them tuna fish/salmon/minced beef, etc. (dog/cat food can be used but sometimes more filler than protein) and then get a bag of Purina Gamebird Startena (it's unmedicated) at 30%

    Threehorses has a much more detailed wound treatment post in this thread: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=215558

    Plenty
    of good advice by other members. I wish you luck. It may be possible to work this out but I'd keep a close eye after reintroduction (improved diet/larger digs) for any concerted pecking and cull the offender(s) immediately.​
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2010
  10. fiberart57

    fiberart57 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 31, 2009
    Colorado
    Hello, sorry that you're having trouble, it sounds bad.

    A few months ago there was a great thread called something like "What I have learned about cannibalism". I don't know how to establish links but will try in a bit.

    You're probably correct in your thinking that it's a problem with space and boredom and lack of free ranging. Is there a reason they can't free range? Have you several feet of snow? Or is it a lack of confined area and you're afraid the birds will escape? Sometimes people will monitor their chickens when out and entice them back inside after an hour or two with treats. Or you could let them out an hour or so before dark and they won't go far.

    Another option is portable, temporary pens. Home Depot in my area sells a plastic chicken netting and while I have a contained yard for mine, I've often thought of getting some to erect a temporary contained pen when I want to garden or do other things. Is that a possibility? You'll have to cut the flight feathers on one wing to prevent them from escaping because it's only three feet high.

    Instead of cat food, reputed to be high in salt, you might try some calf manna from the feed store, but the 24% protein is pretty good.

    Good luck with the problems. It sounds like that if they can get out and stretch their legs abit they'll be better.
    Mary

    Okay found the title: » What I am learning about feather picking and cannibalism" Started October, 2008 and I found it by doing a search.


    I thought it was really informative.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2010

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