1 month apart chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Manhen, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. Manhen

    Manhen Chirping

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    I have 27 3 week old chicks, and in 10 days am getting another batch the same size. Does anyone have advice/tips for combining the two groups? The coop is large enough and more.
     
  2. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

    Wait till the other are 3 weeks and in a look no touch pen and then release them together..
     
  3. I'm in a similar situation. My 2 groups are 3 weeks different in age but that makes a tremendous difference in their size.

    The juveniles are out in the run in a kennel getting integrated. They've been out there somewhere between 2 and 3 weeks now. In another week or 2 I'll release them into the run and put the chickies in the kennel for their meet-and-greet.

    Fingers crossed it all works out. I simply HATE when someone's a mean girl and someone else gets picked on. :mad:
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Are they on heat...will the new ones need heat(I assume day olds)?
    Pics of your coop/brooder setup would be great.
    I would keep them separate but next to each other until the youngers get their feet under them.
    Sometimes you can integrate young chicks with no problem, but....
    hope for the best and prepare for the worst.

    Here's some tips about...
    Integration Basics:
    It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).
    Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.
    Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

    Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

    In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

    The more space, the better.
    Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

    Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

    Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. Lots of diversion and places to 'hide' instead of bare wide open run.


    Oh and...Welcome to BYC! @Manhen (WTH is a Manhen?!) :gig
    Thanks for adding your location:D
     
    HuffleClaw likes this.
  5. Manhen

    Manhen Chirping

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    The brooder is a 6' X 2' galvanized tank with 1/2 inch hardware cloth. The coop is 1/3 of an old barn, and with some section off for working area has about 400 sq. ft. in the coop itself, and is currently in construction. I intend to move the brooder in a week. The who kit and kabroodle will be in the coop so they will see each other but have the hardware cloth. Separate heat lamps as the brooder wont have much spillover. I was going to do the gradual introduction like a junior high sock hop. Breeds are Welsummers, Leghorns, Dominiques, and an assortment of colored birds with assorted colored eggs at the hatcheries' choice sort of thing. I think. Pic is pending...

    I have to admit, it's not really "backyard" chickening is it?
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Might tight space for 27 chicks especially at 3 wks.

    Ehh, some backyarders have that many and more.
     
    MarilynHukill likes this.
  7. Manhen

    Manhen Chirping

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    oh. Yes, if all 27 go to one end of the tank and stand shoulder to shoulder, it is 1/2 full. Lots of fresh shavings, half the tank every other day so far. First wiff of ammonia today, upped the fan. Cool day too, I wonder if that is why the smell, no heat to dry it out constantly.
     
  8. Manhen

    Manhen Chirping

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  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Like when they may be trying to get away from the heat?
    I'd get a brooding area setup outside the tank asap,
    they'll be much happier, healthier, and less stinky with more space and ventilation.
    Are you in southern or northern IL?

    Here's my notes on chick heat, hope something in there might help:

    They need to be pretty warm(~85-90F on the brooder floor right under the lamp and 10-20 degrees cooler at the other end of brooder) for the first day or two, especially if they have been shipped, until they get to eating, drinking and moving around well. But after that it's best to keep them as cool as possible for optimal feather growth and quicker acclimation to outside temps. A lot of chick illnesses are attributed to too warm of a brooder. I do think it's a good idea to use a thermometer on the floor of the brooder to check the temps, especially when new at brooding, later I still use it but more out of curiosity than need.

    The best indicator of heat levels is to watch their behavior:
    -If they are huddled/piled up right under the lamp and cheeping very loudly, they are too cold.
    -If they are spread out on the absolute edges of the brooder as far from the lamp as possible, panting and/or cheeping very loudly, they are too hot.
    -If they sleep around the edge of the lamp calmly just next to each other and spend time running all around the brooder they are juuuust right!

    The lamp is best at one end of the brooder with food/water at the other cooler end of the brooder, so they can get away from the heat or be under it as needed. Wattage of 'heat' bulb depends on size of brooder and ambient temperature of room brooder is in. Regular incandescent bulbs can be used, you might not need a 'heat bulb'. If you do use a heat bulb make sure it's specifically for poultry, some heat bulbs for food have teflon coatings that can kill birds. You can get red colored incandescent bulbs at a reptile supply source. A dimmer extension cord is an excellent way to adjust the output of the bulb to change the heat without changing the height of the lamp.
     
  10. Manhen

    Manhen Chirping

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    Thanks! I think I have most of those points incorporated, I am in southern illinois, use a 100 W red heat lamp from a pet store at one end with two waterers, one with Hydro Hen, and galvanized steel chick feeders (3) in a line up the center from near the water to the warm end. I have two 2X2 sections 15" long angled around the heat lamp but not directly under it. The chicks are usually spread out, but at night are in a quiet carpet under the lamp or in a ring, depending on how cool the night is.

    EDIT: 27% protein poultry and game starter.

    REEDIT: I have relied heavily on Storey's Guide, but have found it does not have much of the cultural component...and the henspouse is dubious on the project...
     

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