1 of 4 not laying...ideas?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Margy1, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. Margy1

    Margy1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We got four chickens back in August, three of them started laying about 3 or 4 weeks ago, and started squatting a week prior. The fourth girl is not yet squatting or laying. Any ideas why she wouldn't be laying?

    Also - we are feeding a mixture of layer feed and grower finisher just mixing it up and filling up their feeder, is it okay for the one not laying to eat layer feed?

    TYIA!![​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2015
  2. song of joy

    song of joy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How old are they? Are they all the same age? What breed(s) are the 3 who are laying? What breed is the one who isn't laying yet?
     
  3. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am guessing they are around 5- 6 months old then? They should all be on layer now. The grower doesn't have enough calcium for layers. They need oyster shell on the side. It's not that unusual for a hen to start laying later than another but the feed adjustment may help.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2015
  4. Margy1

    Margy1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They are about 6 months, we got them the first week of August and they were a week old. They are all EE. The one that isn't laying is a lighter then the others. I don't know how much any of them weigh but if the others way 10 pounds she weighs 5 pounds. She acts healthy, feathers look good, shes got nice coloring on her comb, she eats, plays in the dirt etc. I don't know if her weight has anything to do with her not laying. We will start putting them on more layer feed though.
     
  5. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] That will do the trick. EE's are slow starters anyway so I wouldn't worry.
     
  6. song of joy

    song of joy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can see a lot of variability in the "start of lay" with EE. It depends on which breeds contribute to each hen. I have 2 EE pullets right now. One is a good size and began laying in mid-December at the age of 24 weeks. The other is much smaller and is now 29 weeks of age. She has not begun laying yet, but just yesterday she squatted for the first time, so hopefully she'll be laying by 30 weeks of age.

    Give it another couple of weeks and your other EE will probably start laying. The smaller body size (in and of itself) may or may not be a contributing factor; instead, it may be a result of the breeds making up the slow-to-lay EE.

    Also, it's fine to continue to mix feeds. I often mix a layer feed (16% protein) and all-flock feed (20% protein) in a ratio of 50:50 to achieve 18% protein, as I like to give my hens a bit more protein than the recommended minimum (16%). If you take this approach, be sure to offer calcium free-choice in a separate dish.
     
  7. Margy1

    Margy1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you both! I'm glad to know it could just be her breed, we were worried about her being so much smaller and not laying. Hopefully she starts laying within the next few weeks! I can't wait to see what color eggs we get from her we get green from our other ones! The grower/finisher would be the calcium free option correct???
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I like to feed an 'all flock' 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and all molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat.

    Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

    The higher protein crumble offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer.
     
  9. song of joy

    song of joy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're very welcome! It's really fun seeing what color eggs EE lay! My EE also lays a light green egg and I'm waiting to see what color the other EE will lay.

    A grower/finisher feed would typically have about 1% calcium - likewise for an all-flock feed. Layer feeds usually have around 4% calcium. It's fine to give them the grower/finisher, but since they're laying they would need supplemental calcium on the side (e.g., crushed oyster shell). A large bag of crushed oyster shell goes a long way - it should last several years.
     
  10. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    where are you finding the "all flock"? I've been looking for it, cant find it. What brand is it?
     

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