1 roo or 2 or more

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by MayhemMarr, Sep 25, 2016.

  1. MayhemMarr

    MayhemMarr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 20 hens/pullets and one cockerel should I have another or wait until I add a few heritage chickens to my flock what would be a good ratio for me I would like to hatch a few chicks but am not trying to get to big farm or breeder status just trying to supply my family and my mom's and few close friends with eggs
     
  2. LRH97

    LRH97 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I usually keep one roo for every ten to twelve hens. That being said, I would only add maximum one more roo. You don't want too many roos to hens, as it could result in over-breeding of your hens. Space is also very important when you keep multiple roos. I free range, and I have minimal problems with the five boys I have as far as fighting goes. My top roo occasionally comes over and whips a youngster into shape, but it usually only results in the younger roo losing some feathers. Inadequate space could cause injury if a dominant roo gets a younger roo into a corner and he can't escape. With enough space, rooster rights are more often limited to squabbles, with the younger ones being able to flee from the dominant roo.
     
  3. MayhemMarr

    MayhemMarr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    how much space would be adequate for one more roo? I free range in the afternoons usually and a couple days out of the week they are free all day (it used to be in the morning but we had egg laying issues)
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Can't really put a hard number on it as much depends on the cockbirds' demeanor's.
    You might want to have separate coops/runs in case you run into problems.

    Single bird integration can be problematic,
    unless it's one 'good' and mature cockbird brought into a flock of only pullets/hens.

    Bringing another cockbird into a flock with a cockbird already??......
    .......whew, could be chaotic and disastrously bloody, even fatal.

    I'd stick to the one you have. Start looking at eggs when you break them for breakfast to see how virile your present cockbird is, he may be getting the job done on all of them-if they are all laying.
    You could also confine him with fewer hens for a week or two and incubate the eggs produced in that setting.

    When do you plan on incubating?
     
  5. MayhemMarr

    MayhemMarr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a broody sitting on 4 real (1fake) I was shocked when I noticed her sitting as she is young and a sex link. My 12y is getting a small incubator for Christmas this year (he has been working and saving up and my mom just ordered it)

    I was thinking I would end up with a cockerel when I get new chickens (hoping for some Dorkings)
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  7. MayhemMarr

    MayhemMarr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had to put my Big Mama in our laundry room the other ladies were bothering her but I thought after they hatch I will let them out in to a separate pin but in view of the flock, hoping to be able to get them integrated with as little hiccups as possible
     
  8. LRH97

    LRH97 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree. That's a great point to bring up about the young cockerels that I didn't even think of. I've never added another male chicken any other way than adding them before they hit "puberty". Not saying it can't be done, but I don't have the courage to introduce two adult Roos that are "strangers" to each other. Too many ugly potential consequences.
     

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