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1 roo or 2?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by caliclucker, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. caliclucker

    caliclucker Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi all, I currently have a flock of 12 hens and have decided to add a rooster. I'm curious though if one rooster is enough. Will having more than one make them focus more on each other and so lessen the possibility of having a rooster who is aggressive towards people? Are the hens happier with 1 or more? Also, should I get juvenile roos or adults? Is it even possible to buy juvenile or adult roos? Especially if a specific breed is wanted...I want buff orpingtons. Should I buy male chick(s) and raise them myself and introduce them when the time is right?

    Lastly, what is the best way to introduce a rooster(s)?

    Thanks!

    ooops forgot to add, they free range on half an acre
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2012
  2. ozark hen

    ozark hen Living My Dream

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    well, if you have read Chickens, Mules & Two Old Fools by one of our BYC members, Victoria Twead, you will see where they put a roo in with their hens and it was bedlam for a few minutes and then the roo came out unscathed with the hens adoring him. lol lol We normally put a new chicken in a separate pen where the rest of the flock can see and hear him/her for a week or two. That way if any sickness is present it will show up in the newbie plus the flock gets adjusted to a newbie.
    I made the mistake of keeping only one roo with my small flock....a hawk got him and I was so upset as I had no roo to go with my orps. I now have no problem keeping more than one roo (right now, one silkie roo, two bantie roos and three orp roos) with only 14 hens...seems like a lot??? I would think so but they get along fine. Perhaps it is the breeds? My banties are cochin banties, with the silkie roo they are too small to fertilize my orp hens, thank goodness. I have a full size cochin roo to go with my two cochin hens (they are all very timid) then a red orp roo and a black roo. All I can say is try it and see what works for you. Nothing is written in stone...always remember that. I wouldn't keep only one roo due to what happened here. good luck to you..oh yes, very easy to find full grown roos. Most folks give away their extras. Look on craigslist or your local paper.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2012
  3. Tressa27884

    Tressa27884 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2011
    East Bay, Ca.
    I'm curious though if one rooster is enough. One rooster is plenty for 12 hens
    Will having more than one make them focus more on each other and so lessen the possibility of having a rooster who is aggressive towards people? No. Each rooster is a different creature. There is no way to determine in advance if a rooster will or will not be aggressive in your flock. It took me seven tries to get the right rooster.
    Are the hens happier with 1 or more? My hens don't care in the least.
    Also, should I get juvenile roos or adults? Dealers choice, I brought mine in when they were just over a year old. They adjusted fine. I'd be worried bringing really young boys in that my girls would beat the chicken poop out of them.
    Is it even possible to buy juvenile or adult roos? I got mine from a local rooster rescue. Where are you? It's easier to find Roosters than it is to get rid of them. Post in the auction section, I'm sure you'll get responses.
    Should I buy male chick(s) and raise them myself and introduce them when the time is right? I'm the wrong person to ask. I love raising chicks.
    Lastly, what is the best way to introduce a rooster(s)? I've always thrown them into the flock when everybody is free ranging. I hang out and watch while doing chores just in case, but I've never had a problem.
     

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