10 layers only 4 laying

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by amidonal90, Sep 15, 2016.

  1. amidonal90

    amidonal90 Just Hatched

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    I have 6 isa browns that are all over 24 weeks i get 4 eggs a day but my other 2 are not. Then my black sexlinks are over 20 weeks and nothing. Im still having trouble with them laying in the coop i get 3 in there but only 1 else where. Not sure how to tell if my chickens are laying or are not. Im new to having chickens.
     
  2. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Have patience, they will all be laying soon. Also newly laying pullets are indiscriminate layers their first couple months. So they could all be laying, just not all on the same days.
     
  3. sheetmetaltom

    sheetmetaltom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    they are about the age to start laying, sometimes it takes a little longer. plus in the beginning mine didnt always lay everyday. being almost the beginning of fall could also have something to do with it, we are starting to get less light and that will effect them also. good luck and have fun with them.
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Those are all high production birds...most should lay 5-6 a week..but maybe not.

    If you are having trouble with them laying outside of coop nests I would confine them for a time.
    Free range birds sometimes need to be 'trained'(or re-trained) to lay in the coop nests, especially new layers. Leaving them locked in the coop for 3-4 days (or longer) can help 'home' them to lay in the coop nests. Fake eggs/golf balls in the nests can help 'show' them were to lay. They can be confined to coop 24/7 for a few days to a week, or confine them at least until mid to late afternoon. You help them create a new habit and they will usually stick with it. ..at least for a good while, then repeat as necessary.

    You can tell who is laying and who is not by checking pelvic point spacing.
    Grab them off the roost at night, easier to 'catch' them then, and check them out.
    Vent:
    Dry, tight, and smaller - usually not laying.
    Moist, wide, and larger - usually laying

    Pelvic Points 2 bony points(pelvic bones) on either side of vent:
    Less than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means not laying.
    More than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means laying.
     
  5. amidonal90

    amidonal90 Just Hatched

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    Aug 17, 2016
    Thank you for all the input i will be checking my chickens later tonight. What all do u feed your chickens
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I like to feed a flock raiser/grower/finisher 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat. I do grind up the crumbles (in the blender) for the chicks for the first week or so.

    The higher protein crumble also offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer. I adjust the amounts of other feeds to get the protein levels desired with varying situations.

    Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, I use oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

    Animal protein (mealworms, a little cheese - beware the salt content, meat scraps) is provided during molting and if I see any feather eating.
     

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