10 wk old hens or roosters? lots of pics

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Faraday40, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Overrun With Chickens

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    I hatched some chicks as part of our summer science camp in July & decided to keep the hens. (Roosters are illegal in our town.) I believe I have 3 hens, 2 roosters, and 1 ?? -I just don't know. I have no idea of the breeds - probably mutts - from a rainbow of eggs. (full size - not bantams) Please let me know if my predictions are correct & if you know what breeds might be in the mix.



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    The flock at a glance.


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    Hen. Maybe an Easter-egger? Greenish-grey legs with feather stubble



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    Hen. Large, A lot of "fluff" to her feathers. White with slight buff color on head. Pale legs, beak & comb. Timid around people



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    Hen smaller. yellow legs & beak



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    Rooster. Mostly white. Faint barring (buff color) on wings. Slightly smaller than the others. Comb turned pink at 4 weeks.




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    Rooster. Largest & leader of flock. I hope someone will tell me I'm wrong. Personality says it all with this beauty. He is trained to come when called and goes into the coop when told. He even tolerates going to the park to ride the swings with the kids. I think I see some saddle feathers but no crowing or huge tail yet.



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    ???? The 2 photo collages above are all the same chicken. Grey (kind of thick for size) legs. Has always been the smallest, but is fearless & always busy. I've said rooster since the day it hatched, but at 9 1/2+ weeks, the comb is still small. Only now is the tiny comb getting a little color. Likes to raise & cock its head as you speak. The collar around the back of neck looks pointed, but the actual feather tips are more rounded.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this & give your opinion.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2013
  2. newbie32

    newbie32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry I can not help with the last pic. I am too new to this. I think your guesses for the white ones are correct though.
     
  3. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

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    Your guesses are right 4 pullets and 2 roosters, and yes you are starting to see saddle feathers on the ee rooster (leader of the flock)
     
  4. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Overrun With Chickens

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    Thanks. I was wishing for someone to see hen characteristics in Brownie, but we can't change what nature gave him. I keep going back & forth about the last one (grey one). Do you think hen because of the comb, body shape, or coloring?
     
  5. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

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    All of what you said on the gey hen. Black and white ee males do not look like that.
     
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  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    2 roosters, the rest are hens. That last bird is a hen, the coloring is different on black and white Easter eggers, more patchy and flashy. Plus, that bird has what's called a pea comb, and pea combs are different on males and females, males will have a triple row of ridges where yours only has one. The good news is the pea comb means she's likely to lay green or blue eggs, those are always a hit with the kiddos! Your first bird should also lay colored eggs, and the white hens will probably give you shades of brown, so you'll have a colorful egg basket.
     
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  7. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I see two roosters and four pullets. The reason why I think that the last one is a female, is that a male, as Donrae said, would have a different color pattern. Male Easter Eggers don't usually have that penciled color pattern. They tend to be splotchy in color, with red patches on the wings.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2013
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