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Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by TerrasCritters, Nov 10, 2008.

  1. TerrasCritters

    TerrasCritters In a new coop

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    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008
  2. aiwetir

    aiwetir Chillin' With My Peeps

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    portland, or
    slugs, spiders, anything creepy crawly you find under a rock should work just fine
     
  3. Bebop

    Bebop Chillin' With My Peeps

    All I know is that their care is similar to turtles.
    You need a tank, filter, a place for them to come out of the water (like a turtle dock). I'm not sure if they bask though...
    Hopefully someone will come along to help.
     
  4. TerrasCritters

    TerrasCritters In a new coop

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    . you can find me at chicken crossing dot com
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008
  5. aiwetir

    aiwetir Chillin' With My Peeps

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    portland, or
    it's most likely an Ambystoma macrodactylum, Long-toed salamander, if it came from an urban area, but it's hard to tell by the photo, the other option is a western red-backed salamander which comes in yellow or a van dyke's salamander, but those are pretty rare anywhere but the olympic peninsula

    by the way they aren't reptiles [​IMG]



    edit, i see you posted more photos, that's a long toed
    the frog is a pacific treefrog - i think, it's very lumpy for one
    it's a terrestrial salamander which usually lives in something like coarse woody debris (think rotten chunks of log), i've found them in woodpiles too. i was a wildlife biologist and did many surveys for terrestrial amphibians, but that was ten years ago so the memories are fading.... they probably live underground too, but it's too difficult to look for them that way.

    these guys love it wet, if you are going to keep it, they seem to love it in the 50's to 60's too, that's when we found most of them, when it gets colder they go deeper
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2008
  6. TerrasCritters

    TerrasCritters In a new coop

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    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    I tried to reply this morning but my 1 yr old turned off the computer UPS just before I hit send... finally have time to try again [​IMG]

    Ambystoma in general don't IME make especially good pets, unless you are a herptile collector geek. They need a dampish environment with lots of moss, bark, log, etc to hide underneath (more than your terrarium's got), and you will rarely see them. Plus which as aiwetir says they really do best at temperatures in the 50s (F) which means a basement or a spare fridge turned up rather warm. In a room-temperature environment they do not tend to do well -- burn through way too much food, and tend to get more diseases IME (I was in a large amphibian-ecology lab in grad school, and pretty much everybody had various herptile office pets, Ambystoma spp being relatively common among 'em because several of the guys in the lab were doing their dissertation research on 'em. I've never actually kept the adults myself, though I've used Ambystoma larvae in experiments.)

    Quite honestly, they're not meant to be pets -- if it hasn't been out of the wild too long and hasn't been housed with other captive salamanders I'd really suggest returning it to where it was found. Much the kindest thing to do.

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  8. adoptedbyachicken

    adoptedbyachicken Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    About all I know about that salamander is that every time I turn the horse water trough over to dump and clean it, there they are. Yes they seem to like it damp and cool, but if there is water standing they are never there. I kept one as a kid and it did not last long, it was summer so now what they say about temperature makes me think that was the issue.

    I think the frog is a juvenile Pacific Tree Frog. He is going to be impossible to keep in a short time, they can get out of anything.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    They both look like the types I would catch when I was little and then let go back out in the woods. They both look like the "adult" sized ones I used to find while combing the woods. At least I called them "adult" because the other size I found were "baby" sized. LOL Other than the frogs I stole as tadpoles from the pond and grew up in captivity, I didn't really ever have much luck getting them to eat things I gave them.

    The frogs I had growing up in captivity were so lazy they could only jump about 1/8th of what their wild relatives could do, and would all sit on the upper most log where the bugs would come into their cage as soon as I got home from school. I miss those old days. I can't seem to find them anymore, but maybe that's because I grew up and don't look so closely to the little things anymore.
     
  10. TerrasCritters

    TerrasCritters In a new coop

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    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008

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