11 week old pullet died suddenly

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Ericapd, Jun 12, 2019.

  1. Ericapd

    Ericapd In the Brooder

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    May 15, 2019
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    My pullet I have raised since a chick, died suddenly. We found her laying upside down like she suddenly fell of the roost during the night. We noticed she had also pooped blood that night, which we had never seen before.
    She has been housed with two other pullets that have seemed fine and healthy. They have been living in the coop in the backyard since about eight weeks old, in the shade under an overhang. I do let them out in the backyard where they eat whatever they can put in their beaks.
    In the coop, they have been eating organic grower feed, chick grit, flock party snacks, and scratch.
    I looked up the symptoms of coccidiosis and found that the only symptom she has had is that I noticed her poop was brown and liquidy sometimes. Even when I noticed this poop, I looked it up in the poop chart and figured they were cecal poops. She never had ruffled feathers, seemed to be growing normally, eating and drinking normally, and had plenty of energy to roam around the yard all day like the others.
    Now I only have the two and I have begun dosing them with Corid in their water in case of coccidiosis infection. I also sanitized and washed out the coop and feeders. I heard that the oocysts can live in soil for two years. These birds have pooped all over the backyard! Will they just keep getting it if this is what the case is?!! I’d also like to be able to replace my girl that died too and not infect a newbie!!! Any suggestions/ideas about what’s going on and what else I should do?
     
  2. AGirlAndHerChickens

    AGirlAndHerChickens In the Brooder

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    Sep 24, 2018
    The cause of death sounds like Sudden Death Syndrome, or SDS. Look it up. Some sources might say differently, but it usually happens in birds between 72 hours to 12 weeks of age with the highest risk being between 2 and 3 weeks.
     
    Ericapd likes this.
  3. Ericapd

    Ericapd In the Brooder

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    May 15, 2019
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Thanks,
    I read about it, but I didn’t see anything about pooping blood.
     
  4. AGirlAndHerChickens

    AGirlAndHerChickens In the Brooder

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    Sep 24, 2018
    Was it reddish tinted poop, or positively blood?
     
  5. Ericapd

    Ericapd In the Brooder

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    May 15, 2019
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    It was just blood. Like it sprayed out onto the wall behind the roosting bar. It was awful. : (
     
  6. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    My Coop
    I am glad you started the Corid, it sounds like coccidiosis to me.

    Can you collect some fresh poop from the other two birds and bring it to a vet's office for testing?
    Call your local vets and see if they will run a fecal float test on some poop if you bring it in. My local vets do this, without seeing the bird. It's a cheap test and it will let you know for sure if you are dealing with coccidia or possibly a bacteria infection.


    Are you using the liquid or powdered Corid and how much?
     
    Wyorp Rock likes this.
  7. Ericapd

    Ericapd In the Brooder

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    May 15, 2019
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    I’m using the liquid. 2 tsp per gallon, using 1/2 tsp for the one quart waterer that I have. I’m going to call my vet and see what she thinks, I just found out she knows about chickens!
     
    Texas Kiki likes this.
  8. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    I'm very sorry for your loss, that must have been awful to find. :hugs
    The only way to know for sure would be to have a necropsy done on that bird. Coccidiosis can sometimes kill quickly, some strains are more virulent than others. Coccidia are everywhere and yes, they survive a long time in the environment. If that is what happened, then birds who are exposed build up resistance over time. Birds that get sick and survive build up resistance. Treating the others with Corid won't hurt them, so I would go ahead and complete treatment, just in case. Young birds and chicks are most at risk, older birds usually don't become ill unless their immune systems are compromised or they are exposed to a strain they were not previously exposed to. Moving chicks from a brooder to the ground, moving birds to new ground, or bringing in new birds to the flock are all ways they can be exposed to new strains. When doing any of those things it's a good idea to keep a close eye for any symptoms that may show up. If you can get a fecal done, that might help, but since they've already had Corid the results may not be accurate. Because the Corid is very safe, I would treat anyway. Awesome that you have a vet that doesn't eye roll when you say 'chicken'!
     
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  9. Ericapd

    Ericapd In the Brooder

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    May 15, 2019
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    And it just sucks that I could have treated her earlier, as soon as a saw liquidy poop (if cocci is the actual issue). I lost the most tame bird that liked to sit on my lap and fly onto my arm.
     
  10. Ericapd

    Ericapd In the Brooder

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    May 15, 2019
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    Thanks so much for your advice! Should I probably wait to get an adult when introducing a new bird? Wait until they are all adults so that they have better immunity?
     

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