13 birds and maybe 1-4 eggs a day!! HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!! how do i tell which are the egg layers?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by clucky3255, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. clucky3255

    clucky3255 Chillin' With My Peeps

    hi everyone! I am in some need of some help...i have five grown hens.( two Brahmas,one orpington, and one NH red) and i have two guineas ( 4-5 months old now) , three EE's ,one cuckoo maran, one cherry ....and my sisters have three male ducks and three female ones. all the younger ones .. especially theEE's they are 5-6 months old.so my mom wants to know if there is a easy way to figure out which are laying? is there a way? because mom says that if they dont step it up this fall then they cannot stay. ( death for meet or sell as pets.[​IMG]) so i really need some help!! thank you all for any advice. i would like some very soon! My mom says if they do have to go then I can get some leghorns or barred rocks come spring. at least that part is nice!



    thank yall!! my hat is off to you!

    LOVE clucky3245
     
  2. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    5-6 months old is young. Some EE's take longer than others. Mine typically start at 5 months, but some have even taken longer.

    The way to tell is to watch, or you can put food colouring in their vents and there will be streaks on the eggs they've laid. Just remember which ones have which colour lol.

    Or you can post some pictures. Usually you can tell by combs if they are close to lay, or if there is some more waiting to do.

    Are you sure of their age as well? When were they hatched?
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. clucky3255

    clucky3255 Chillin' With My Peeps

    hey thanks. i am positive they are around 5-6 months because i got them in May and they were a day old. how do you put food colouring in there vents? HOw can you tell by looking at the comb or wattles?


    LUV clucky3255
     
  4. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    EEs definitely take longer than others. RSLs, white Leghorns, Tetra Tints, those breeds will lay around 5-6 months, but other breeds typically take longer. I've had EEs wait up to 7 months, and I once had some wait 11 months, but I rehomed those. You need to give them more time. Your birds are much to young yet to think about sending them to freezer camp for not laying!

    Hens that are laying will have bright red combs. They will also have red, moist vents and there will be plenty of space between their pin bones. Pullets that are close to lay will often crouch down as if they are waiting for a rooster to mate them when you stroke their backs.

    Here's a document for you. Sorry about the cruddy, long URL. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...koDICw&usg=AFQjCNFHf5WeKm4HRyuvRni-BMKDqOY8SQ
     
  5. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    If you got them in May, they are 4 months old, not 5 or 6.
     
  6. clucky3255

    clucky3255 Chillin' With My Peeps

    ok guys i wll talk to my mom about waiting longer. thank you .. mom said there 5-6 months. but now htat i think bout it you are right.
     
  7. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    They are most likely right on schedule. Probably should start laying within a month or two. I have some born May 5th - and they aren't even close to laying judging by their combs.
     
  8. clucky3255

    clucky3255 Chillin' With My Peeps

    how do i tell by there combs>????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i needa answer now!!!!
     
  9. clucky3255

    clucky3255 Chillin' With My Peeps

    i have been getting one egg every other day that is considerably smaller anad rounder than the others. i have gotten two or three total ... ist just startered like recently. do you guys think i have a young layer?
     
  10. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    When a hen is ready to lay eggs, her comb and wattles will get larger and much redder.

    And yes, a teeny egg is a sure sign of a young layer's first few eggs. They are called pullet eggs.
     

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