16 chicken coop build

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Mattsculpt, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. Mattsculpt

    Mattsculpt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 29, 2011
    Proctor, Arkansas
    I took a break from fence construction and started my coop build this weekend. My chicks will be here on the 20th and I want to brood them in the coop. I originally planned for 6 chickens but somehow I ordered 16 instead.
    I'm using this plan for my coop and modifying it.
    http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/Avian/plhouse1.pdf
    My coop is 8 ft x 8 ft, taller, has a sloped roof and I added a base of 4x4 ground contact treated timbers.


    Saturday I framed the walls with some help from my soon to be niece-in-law, Amy. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]The ends of the walls are cut at a 45 degree angle and bolt together.[​IMG] The sides slope front to back with just enough angle for the rain to run off. Snow is rare and light here.


    Sunday I lap cut the foundation lumber, leveled it and put the attaching bolts in. Together Amy and I put the walls on the foundation. Then we used clamps to straighten all the warped corners, top and bottom and I put in screws as well as the bolts to get it square. (So much for the portable aspect.)
    [​IMG]

    I was going to hang joists today but I have the wrong joist hangers. It was a good place to stop.
     
  2. wvtim

    wvtim Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2012
    You want to get the coop up off the ground - trust me. I almost built mine on the ground and my wife forced me to put a floor in it and Im so glad that I did for so many reasons. If gives them a place to get out of the sun in summer, the snow in the winter and they can take dust baths under the coop.
     
  3. wvtim

    wvtim Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2012
    Many homesteaders have made the decision to build their coop elevated from the ground beneath it. Although homesteaders debate this topic, there are many reasons to give your chicken coop a bit of lift. The height you choose to build your chicken coop off the ground, if any, should be anywhere from one to three feet, depending on your reasons. Here are a few of the most common reasons homesteaders elevate their chicken coop.
    1. Protection from predators
    Although homesteaders who oppose elevated chicken coops will argue that a chicken coop should provide adequate protection using a solid floor structure and wire mesh netting, other homesteaders claim that elevating the coop prevents predators from entering the coop. If the chicken coop is elevated at least one foot of the ground, predators will have difficulty burrowing and eating holes in the floor of your coop.
    In order for this to be effective, however, the coop must be at least one foot off the ground. If your coop is only a few inches off the ground, predators will almost be encouraged to burrow underneath the coop.
    2. Climate control
    If you live in a warm climate, elevating your chicken coop will help keep temperatures inside the coop at more comfortable levels during the hottest months.
    3. Shelter
    Elevating your coop a foot or more off the ground will give your chickens a place to take shelter when the sun is too hot or when it’s raining.
    4. Dust bath
    A little vertical space underneath your chicken coop gives your birds the perfect place to take a dust bath.
    5. Snow and Ice
    In colder climates, snow and ice build up around the door of your coop can make the door difficult to open. Avoid having to dig or chisel your way into the chicken coop by elevating it off the ground a foot or more. Snow and ice won’t build up around the door as much and your chickens will avoid being snowed in.
    6. Portability
    Elevating the chicken coop allows you to more easily move it to another space on your property. Moving the coop from time to time allows your chickens to peck at different areas of land and avoids you having one area of your property that is overly pecked and other areas that could use some pecking.
    7. Floods and rotting
    Preventing floods and rotting is one of the most obvious reasons to elevate your chicken coop off the ground. A foot or so of space between your coop and the earth beneath it will prevent rain waters from rising up into your coop and will prevent moisture retention in the floor as well.
    These are just some of the many reasons to elevate your chicken coop. Of course, if you live in a temperate climate and your coop has adequate predator protection, you may find that elevating your coop is unnecessary. Other homesteaders may find that this is one of the best decision they ever make!
     
  4. Mattsculpt

    Mattsculpt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 29, 2011
    Proctor, Arkansas
    wvtim,
    Thank you for your imput. Let me address your concerns. There will also be a 24 by 8 foot run attached.
    1. The coop is inside a fenced area and will have an electric fence around the coop and run. There will also be a buried skirt to keep out diggers.
    2. In summer here, the coolest area is next to the ground, not above it. Also I will have hardware cloth windows that take up half the walls in summer and can be covered in winter. Also the ventalation spaces at the top 1 and 2 feet of the east and west walls that are always open.
    3. and 4.The run is shaded and they can dust bath there. If they are really bothered by the rain thay can stay inside, but my neighbor's chickens are out in all but downpours.
    5. As I mentioned snow is rare and light. I'm not worried about the1 to 5 days a year they may not get out because of snow.
    6. The chickens will free range inside the fence whem I'm home and I may build a tractor later for them. After all the work to get it up and how much it weighs this is only portable if you have a big tractor. I have a small car. Its not moving. ever.
    7. The spot is dry where the coop is. Last year we had a hundred year flood in our area and that part of my yard was not wet. The foundation lumber is treated for ground contact and immersion in fresh water. I'm not worried about it rotting.
     
  5. Mattsculpt

    Mattsculpt Chillin' With My Peeps

    121
    8
    99
    Oct 29, 2011
    Proctor, Arkansas
    There was an article about the pros and cons of a dirt floor and I chose to go with a dirt floor. I'll see if I can locate the article. I will be adding sand on the bottom and then bedding over that in the coop. Just sand in their run.
     
  6. wvtim

    wvtim Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2012
    Sounds like you've thought it all through pretty well. My chickens dont go in the coop unless its to lay an egg or go to bed. I wish I would of taken a picture of my coop this past week when it downpoured all day - it would of showed 20 + chickens happy under the coop. My chickens dont have a run - they just free range on my 12 acres.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012

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