1st time shipping eggs...Help!

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by tigerrrrrrrlilly, May 15, 2010.

  1. tigerrrrrrrlilly

    tigerrrrrrrlilly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2010
    San Diego, CA
    I am going to be shipping duck eggs for the first time. What is the best way to package them to assure they arrive safely? They are somewhat large but still fit in cartons. I have seen different ways but want advice so I know what method is best. What do you all do when shipping? What shipping method do you recommend from CA to OR?
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  2. katharinad

    katharinad Overrun with chickens

    I've seen wonderful bubble wrap jobs and recently had one packed totally different. This one will be a very high hatch rate. It was packed in egg cartons (6 packs) with additional pine bedding to make it tight and nothing would move. Then the cartons were put into more pine bedding shaving to the point that it was very compacted and tight. They shipped 18 eggs. This package was abused by the post office. It was marked x-rayed and had a hole in the side. Something sharp when in and cracked one egg. The bedding absorbed it completely and kept the other eggs clean. Best it did not smell bad, nor was anything oozing out of the box. The pine shavings absorbed the shock and protected the rest. On top of that all egg were able to breath. Try that with packaging peanuts and bubble wrap. I now have 17 remaining eggs in the incubator and 1.5 weeks to go. They all candle nicely and have heartbeats when checked with a stethoscope. You may hear other suggestions on this board. I guess you have to figure out what works for you. BTW the seller said she liked pine shavings because you can recycle them in the yard. Nothing toxic that will go into the landfill. Good point I would say. I plan on selling eggs down the road and will definitely ship that way. My personal opinion.
    Katharina
     
  3. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Personally, I think you should have figured this out before you signed up for the swap this month [​IMG]

    Anyway, I'll tell you how I do it, I have had very good luck.

    First off, do not use a flat rate box, you will pay up to twice as much for shipping!
    Get any kind of box, at least 6" deep and 7" square (for 6 eggs), this is the size of the #4 USPS priority box. Wrap each egg (since I assume you are sending ducks? [​IMG]) in 1/2 sheet of bubble wrap. Lay the egg in the bubble wrap, fold each side over the egg, and roll it up. Tape it to keep it rolled, then move onto the next. Once you have all eggs wrapped in bubbles, fill the bottom of the box with crumpled newspaper and place the eggs small end down in the box. Just be sure the eggs don't touch the sides of the box; if so, you need a bigger one [​IMG]

    Fill all 4 sides around the eggs with more crumpled paper, so the eggs cannot move. Fill the remainder of the box with crumpled paper, seal and mail [​IMG]

    It does take a bit of trial and error, but it is pretty simple once you get used to doing it. Just make sure that the eggs don't touch the sides of the box in any way, so they don't get cracked if the box gets 'bumped'. Also make sure the eggs cannot move, as this is probably the biggest cause of broken air cells. At least if they are well-padded and wiggle-free, they have a better chance of surviving.

    You can use other fillers to pad the box, personally I wouldn't use wood chips, since that would add a lot of unnecessary weight to your box.

    For egg carton shipping, I wrap each egg in paper (towel, toilet, news, etc.) enough so they don't rock inside the carton. Leave some extra on the big end to take up the room in the top of the carton. Wrap packing tape around the carton and wrap the carton in bubble wrap. Then proceed with packing as above [​IMG]

    ETA: The only shipping method I use for eggs is USPS priority mail. Parcel post takes too long, and UPS or FedEx aren't any better for eggs, but are usually more expensive. Also, remember that the most vulnerable part of the egg is the sides; these will crack before anything. Make sure the sides of the eggs are protected, and you should be good to go [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  4. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    I use bubblewrap. Each egg gets rolled up in bubblewrap. The middle and both sides get taped, I use the roll of priority stickers to tape the bubblewrap. I fill the box up with some shredded paper. Each egg gets put in the box with the large end up. I use the box that is around 7"x7", I think box #4. I can fit up to 9 bantam or call duck eggs in there, 8 standard eggs. I stack the eggs next to eachother, 3 in one row 3 in the other. Then I lay the last 2-3 eggs on their side on top of those. I slide shredded paper down all the sides and into the corners. I put more shredded paper/bubblewrap onto of the eggs and close it up. I label the box "fragile" and "handle with care".
     
  5. katharinad

    katharinad Overrun with chickens

    Flat rate shipping goes by 3 sizes, weight and shipping zone. The rate varies by size even going to the same address with the same weight.
    The medium sized flat rate box will work for eggs, if it is over 2 pounds and going more then 2 shipping zones. That will cost 10.85. The large flat rate box will kill you on shipping cost unless you get over 5 pounds into it. The small flat rate box is out of question, since it can only hold a video tape. I own a mail order business and we ship hundreds of boxes per week. You just have to know the shipping weights and zones. I hope that clarifies the shipping question when it comes to flat rate.
    Katharina
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  6. tigerrrrrrrlilly

    tigerrrrrrrlilly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2010
    San Diego, CA
    Shelly- I did research this before signing up but wanted opinions of everyone and what they believe is best because I read so many different ways to do it.
    I also have to send some to somebody outside of the swap by their request, but it's in CA and not far to go. There has to be a first time for everything and I will never learn if I don't just do it! I appreciate you helping me, that was great info!

    I planned priority shipment, but was curious concerning box types (flat vs. reg) etc. this is all very helpful thanks everybody for the advice, would love to hear more of everyone's individual ideas of the different methods out there and how well they work for them, please send more!
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  7. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:The only time I've ever had a case where it would have been cheaper to send something in the flat rate boxes, the boxes would not have been big enough. The rates did go up this year, but if you print the postage online you save about $1 off every package. I rarely have anything cost more than $10 for shipping, and some of my packages weigh 4-5 pounds [​IMG]

    ETA: There are 3 flat rate sizes, but the small flat rate is too small for anything but button quail eggs [​IMG] It's more of a book or VHS sized shipping box.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  8. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    I ship Fedex ground. They take from 3-5 days to ship to most locations. It's cheaper than a large flat rate USPS box. I wrap each egg individually in LARGE CELL bubble wrap. It takes up a little more space, but I have only lost 1 egg so far (knock on wood).
     
  9. katharinad

    katharinad Overrun with chickens

    Interesting, because FedEx and UPS do not allow eggs to be shipped. I've found that UPS and FedEx are harsher in their treatment of boxes. Their sorting machines are running at a faster speed. I remember a letter from UPS telling me that there machines are now running at a lower rate due to high claim in damages. They are still faster then the postals. Checked that will a relative who works at UPS headquarters. Can't remember the rpm of their conveyors, but I did ask my local postal inspector to check into the speed of the ones used by the post office. That must have been like 3 years ago. I have a mail order business and ship hundreds of boxes each week. I no longer offer FedEx, due to their sloppiness. They use contractors to deliver and pickup packages. These contractors sometimes delay packages by a day. Especially in rural areas. That and their poor handling. I still use UPS for heavy packages and postal for the lighter stuff. BTW all Priority Mail boxes send through the post office are handled by FedEx. They are sorted by the postal service and then given to FedEx to be put onto their own air crafts and later given back to the postal service.
    Katharina
     
  10. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    interesting, because FedEx and UPS do not allow eggs to be shipped.

    I think you mean live chicks. Those can't be shipped, but hatching eggs are not listed as a prohibited item.

    I've found that UPS and FedEx are harsher in their treatment of boxes.

    It may be a regional issue, but if you have seen some of the post office boxes I have gotten lately, you might change your mind. A LOT more damage, lost packages, etc... are coming from the post office these days.

    I have a mail order business and ship hundreds of boxes each week. I no longer offer FedEx, due to their sloppiness.

    Funny, we avoid USPS when we can because of their sloppiness. Not to mention their rudeness and general bad attitude. I can call my Fedex rep and have any problem taken care of in minutes. Try that at the post office some time! [​IMG]

    We own a print shop and shipping is one of our services. We ship a lot of packages daily. The only ones we ever had a problem with are the ones the customers pack themselves. In over a year, only one package got mangled by the machinery. The customer packed damaged packages all got refunds even when it was their own darn fault.

    Like I said, it might be regional, but the Fedex crew that services the Colorado area is tops.​
     

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