2 Alpha roosters?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by TinyTotsSeramas, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. TinyTotsSeramas

    TinyTotsSeramas Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2011
    Smithsburg
    Is it possible to have 2 Alpha roosters in a flock? I have been reading about Alpha roosters keeping a Beta rooster from reaching his full potential until the Alpha rooster is removed from the flock... I have 2 roosters, a Mille Fleur d'Uccle and a Red Pyle Old English Game Bantam, who are where they should be in growth, they dont fight each other and they both crow up a storm all day long! The both have their group of RSL hens they hang out with when let out to free range but at night they all go back into the same coop with each other..

    Here is the d'Uccle -

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Here is the Red Pyle -

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Kaeta44

    Kaeta44 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I had two roosters (both bantams). They got on all right with each other, but there weren't really enough hens to keep them both satisfied - between them the two of them they were running the poor hens ragged! So in the end we reluctantly found a new home for one of them, and everyone is much happier now.

    So providing you have plenty of hens for them both, everything should be OK.

    http://muckycluckers.blogspot.com/
     
  3. Kaeta44

    Kaeta44 Chillin' With My Peeps

  4. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Anything`s possible, but this is not the norm. You`re blessed..........Pop
     
  5. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,889
    9,674
    766
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Given enough space and enough hens there may be no problems, but that all can change in an instant. They're still young.
     
  6. TinyTotsSeramas

    TinyTotsSeramas Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2011
    Smithsburg
    Quote:I hope not..
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    20,139
    3,351
    496
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    I've had different things happen with multiple roosters. Often they will reach an accommodation and form a good team taking care of the girls. Sometimes they fight to the death. As Sourland said, they can change as they mature.

    I've had three roosters with 15 hens. The dominant rooster and the least dominant rooster kept one harem and the second in charge had his own harem, about evenly split between the hens. They did roost on the same coop.

    I've had two roosters with a dozen hens. The two roosters hung out together, sort of separate from most of the hens. There was no doubt which one was dominant; they discussed that on occasion. But the hens were kept fertile by both roosters and they did protect the flock.

    Maybe these examples will give you an idea. There was no doubt that there was one Alpha and any others were subordinates, but they did reach an accommodation.
     
  8. TinyTotsSeramas

    TinyTotsSeramas Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2011
    Smithsburg
    Quote:How do you ever tell who is the Alpha if they dont ever fight it out, or even go near each other for that matter?
    the Mille Fleur stays outside sitting on the roost (he would sleep on the top of the run if we let him) with his girls and the Red Pyle sleeps inside in one of the nesting boxes with his girls on the floor.. They go where their girls go..
     
  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,732
    2,355
    466
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    They are still young, yet two alphas long-term possible where birds can have discrete (or nearly so) territories. When I write birds, harem lead by rooster is emplied. I have multiple harems on my property, each led by a rooster. Each harem has a roost, day roost and feeding station. Only truely shared resource is waterers and only one harem approaches at a time. Their is some overlap of foraging areas but harems seem to stay apart, even when food is thrown increasing odds they will interact. Roosters display to each and sometimes chase each other back and forth but very seldom is contact made. Contact is reserved for floating / satellite / beta roosters that do not have a harem and continually try to steal or copulate with hens. At present one of my alphas is a game rooster and he is no more inclined to push fight with another harem master beyond display stage. The displays are cool to see. Fights will eventually break out and they almost always start with a beta that decides to challenge a harem master for his flock. It is when games are involved that a real mess will develope.

    If area tighter where territories are not large enough, then a scrap will occur eventually and somebody is going to be demoted to beta.
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    20,139
    3,351
    496
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    They do fight it out. A lot of times that is more chasing and running away than fighting, and you won't even see that much unless you spend a fair amount of time with them or just happen to catch them at the right moment. That is one reason they separate into two different flocks most of the time. To keep conflict at a minimum.

    Don't get me wrong. Sometimes roosters die from these fights, so it is not always wine and roses. But it is not always a bloody fight to the death either. If it is working out well for you, great. Don't overstress yourself about it. Sometimes good things happen.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by