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2 chickens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by TERRYF, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. TERRYF

    TERRYF New Egg

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    I just spoke to the court house zoning department and they said I could have 2 chickens. I am looking for the easiest chickens to take care of but the most egg production. I think I would like ones that do well in the cold, I live in Waldorf, Md and right now the temp if 32 degrees. So any suggestions?
    Thanks
     
  2. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If your goal is egg production in terms of numbers, consider Leghorns. In terms of egg size, Barred Rock. They both are all weather birds. I have both and I am north of you.

    Just remember, they dont lay every day and will take time off to molt every year.
     
  3. Gino1126

    Gino1126 Out Of The Brooder

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    TERRYF: I always wondered what the zoning law/rule concerning owning chickens in Waldorf, MD. I could never find anything so I just assumed there were none. I'm in Waldorf, off Saint Charles Parkway near the Safeway (Smallwood Drive). I've been dying to get a few hens but scared to death to do so. I have houses all round me and not sure how that will go over with the neighbors. However, someone in my neighborhood has a rooster because I heard him back in the spring and couldn't believe what I was hearing so I stayed outside until he crowed again. I use to have chickens in Havana, Alabama, but when I applied to work for a certain agency, I was assigned to their Headquarters in DC instead of their Birmingham office. I didn't want to leave but I didn't want to miss out on an opportunity of a life time. So, I packed up and moved and left my chickens with my father. Hardest thing I ever had to do.

    Black Australorps are very gentle and hold the record for most eggs layed in a year. They even lay in winter. I go the the Amish market in St. Mary's County down route 5 on Saturdays just to look at the chickens they have for sell. They had a batch of Black Australorps chicks for sale last year as well as many other breeds. Also, I go to the Tractor Supply Store in the Spring very Tuesday just to see the baby chicks they have for sale...so much so that the workers see me and smile. I have hundreds of books and magazines. I could go on, but I'll stop. Just good to know I'm not the only chicken fan in Waldorf.[​IMG]
     
  4. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    I would disagree about Lehorns--while they lay super well, they're Mediterranean breeds and don't do well in very cold weather. They also aren't the friendliest birds. I have nine or so right now, and they are fine with weather in the 20s, but I have to watch their combs once the temps are below zero and they don't like to lay in winter without supplementary light.

    If the most eggs for the fewest chickens is your goal, try any version of the red or black sex link. Red Stars, Cinnamon Queens, Golden Buffs, ISA Brown--these are all versions of sex-linked red chicken. Black sex links are often called Black Stars. These girls are bred for high egg production and will lay all winter with minimal light. They're not funky heritage breeds, but they will lay 6-7 eggs a week on average. They are egg laying machines like Leghorns, but MUCH friendlier. In fact, my Golden Buffs are the friendliest, calmest chickens in the flock.
     
  5. Scooter&Suzie

    Scooter&Suzie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree about the red-sex links - I have one and she lays everyday, even in the winter and normally doesn't slow down while molting. This is her second winter - She will be two at the end of May. While they are super friendly, I don't recommend them if you are planning on keeping them until they die of old age (about 8 years maybe?) because mine has very shabby feathers from never molting - Something I suspect has been bred out of them. Great if you want chicken soup, not the best if you want a pet.

    My all time favorite for a great egg laying pet: Plymouth rocks. VERY friendly, from my experience, and great for egg laying.
     
  6. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh, they'll moult. My RSL must have lost half their feathers this past fall. They didn't moult their first year (pullets often don't) but really made up for it the second year. They even quit laying for two weeks.

    That being said, you are correct about them not being the best breed to keep until they die of old age. They lay so profusely while they're young that they burn out sooner than other breeds.

    I like Plymouth Rocks very much as well--but they don't lay nearly as well as the RSL and they need light in the winter if you want eggs.
     
  7. Scooter&Suzie

    Scooter&Suzie Chillin' With My Peeps

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  8. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    Poor girls. Wonder why they haven't moulted. I really don't think it's a trait of the breed, since RSL form the backbone of my laying flock and I've never seen what you describe. I've had several strains of RSL, too--Cinnamon Queen, Red Star, Golden Buff and ISA Brown.

    Plymouth Rocks are awesome, though. They're probably my very breed of chicken, and I always have at least a couple for my own personal amusement, even though the RSL and Leghorns pay the feed bill. Right now I have Partridge, Buff, and Silver Penciled. I'm picking up a few Barred from the hatchery this April, too.

    I like their size, too--but that's more because we eat the roosters...[​IMG]
     
  9. NestingHillsSC

    NestingHillsSC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quantity and size you can't go wrong with The RIR. I have a flock of them just for egg production. They will lay ALL year long. And mine never go broody. Leghorns are egg laying machines. But they will go broody!!! If you can only have 2 hens then that's half your flock not laying. I would go with the RIR. Nice big eggs too.
     

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