2 dogs to protect the farm?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by LoganTW, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. LoganTW

    LoganTW Chillin' With My Peeps

    I was thinking that if I got two puppies they would learn not to chase chickens, is that right or am I completely off? Also I plan to get livestock next year so should I wait until then? And should I have the dogs wear spiked collars in case something attacks them? Oh! And should I get purebreds or would mutts do? Because I would rather get mutts.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    That can work, but remember that some dog breeds are natural herders, and some are natural hunters. I do think, if you're willing to spend the time, that any dog can learn to co-exist with chickens and other animals. You just have to give them alot of exposure to them, and watch over them so they learn to behave well.

    The spiked collar probably isn't necessary, in my humble opinion. :)
     
  3. SavageDestiny

    SavageDestiny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just curious, but why would you rather get mutts as opposed to a purpose-bred purebred dog created and bred to do the work that you want? That's just mind-boggling to me. There are people cross breeding dogs for specific purposes as well, but those still aren't mutts, they're purpose-bred crossbreeds. Getting dogs bred for the work you want them to do is your best chance for success.
     
  4. Catmoose1347

    Catmoose1347 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't know if the OP would agree with me, but I would get mutts because they are healthier than pure breeds. Yes, a dog that had more "herder" than "hunter" is preferable, but any dog, if raised properly around chickens from a young age should do well with them.

    Not to mention they're cheaper. [​IMG]
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I need to know the number and type livestock. Also predator challenges. Purebred not needed but dogs need to be physically capable. Biggest challenge maybe limited evperience of OP.
     
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  6. SavageDestiny

    SavageDestiny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mutts are not healthier than purebreds. Mixing two dogs together doesn't magically make health issues disappear. In fact, mixing two breeds prone to something like hip dysplasia actually increases the risk of that problem, since both parents could be/are prone to it. Hybrid vigor is an urban legend, put out by people breeding designer dogs that want to make more money off their dogs.
     
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  7. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    All breeding two vastly different types of dogs together produces in the first generation is a litter of pups that will at best have 25% of the offspring possessing desirable traits. By breeding two inbred lines together (like a Pekinese and a toy Poodle) you are only more sure of what the pups will look like.

    If this wasn't true then a White Leghorn rooster crossed over a white Cornish X hen would produce a hen that laid 300 eggs per year and who weighed 8 pounds at 10 weeks of age.
     
  8. islandgirl82

    islandgirl82 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just my two cents here... yes well trained dogs can absolutely coexist with other species but it will take consistency and a lot of patience. Also, it's not a good idea to get puppies that are the same age, especially if they're litter mates because they end up being so bonded with each other that getting them to focus on training gets incredibly difficult. Prey drive can be devastating enough with one dog but put it in a pack (even if it is just one other dog) and you'll have a heck of a time getting them to stop. I would suggest starting with one and training it to behave the way you want around your livestock before adding another. That first dog can become an invaluable tool in helping to train the second on how to behave.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2014
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  9. Catmoose1347

    Catmoose1347 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is absolutely true. But a cross between a dog prone to hip dysphasia and one that is not has more of a chance of not being prone to it. Breeds with flat faces have breathing problems. A pug-bulldog cross will have a very high chance of having issues, but a pug- Labrador cross has less. Mixes are not necessarily healthier, but can be. It's the responsibility of the owner to pick out what dog they want. A lot of the time, you can gather quite a bit about a dog's ancestry just by looking at it. (Not always, but you can choose to take a gamble or move on to the next one. There are plenty out there.)
     
  10. LoganTW

    LoganTW Chillin' With My Peeps



    Catmoose is correct, their cheaper, they can the more healthy if you pick them right, and also because I prefer to rescue as opposed to buying from a breeder, and it's way easier to to find mutts then it is to find purebreds. And when you do find purebreds at a shelter they tend to be much more expensive, at least where I live, but if I got purebreds I would get a German shepherd and a boarder collie, which I am considering.

    And centrarchid, I am hoping to get goats, cows, horses, hogs, turkeys, ducks, geese, guinea fowl, and maybe some alpacas or llamas, or both, and of course I have the chickens. And the predators we get here are minks, hawks, coyotes, and occasionally fox, and I do not have much experience so your right there.

    And thanks for all the answers so far!
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2014

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