2 month old brown leghorn cockerel in NY

horselove

Chirping
Nov 23, 2015
65
21
86
NY
I bought a few birds from a poultry store (they were hatchery bred) and unfortunately got a boy in a batch of girls and my local laws do not allow roosters. He is supposed to be a speckled sussex but I believe they gave us the wrong breed (my guess is Welsummer). He isn't mean, if anything he's shy, and I was hoping to rehome him, though I don't know anyone in the midhudson region who could give him a home that isn't a dinner table.
Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 1.40.09 PM.png

This is him yesterday in the garage.
 
Last edited:

SE WA Guy

Chirping
May 14, 2020
67
121
63
Wow. What a handsome, lad. Such a striking profile.

The real shame is that 're-homing' a rooster doesn't have any guarantee that the next stop will appreciate him in the same way you do. Personally, I don't have qualms about eating meat I raised myself, nor do I personally have a problem shipping off a young cockerel to a place that will harvest them for meat. But that's just me.

If you're really serious about having this bird have a full life, even in somebody else's care, you may have to sweeten the pot. You might find a more rural setting that will take him and let him live out his days, but again, there's no guarantees that they won't put him on the table eventually.

When you post an ad for somebody to take him locally, you should definitely say what your intention in rehoming him is. But you might get a better list of takers if you offer to drive the rooster yourself, along with a feeder and waterer and maybe a bag of food. Just ideas.
 

horselove

Chirping
Nov 23, 2015
65
21
86
NY
Wow. What a handsome, lad. Such a striking profile.

The real shame is that 're-homing' a rooster doesn't have any guarantee that the next stop will appreciate him in the same way you do. Personally, I don't have qualms about eating meat I raised myself, nor do I personally have a problem shipping off a young cockerel to a place that will harvest them for meat. But that's just me.

If you're really serious about having this bird have a full life, even in somebody else's care, you may have to sweeten the pot. You might find a more rural setting that will take him and let him live out his days, but again, there's no guarantees that they won't put him on the table eventually.

When you post an ad for somebody to take him locally, you should definitely say what your intention in rehoming him is. But you might get a better list of takers if you offer to drive the rooster yourself, along with a feeder and waterer and maybe a bag of food. Just ideas.
yes, I'm aware what rehoming often means in regards to a rooster, and I do understand that will probably be his fate. my first choice would of course be for him to live and I would willingly throw in a bag of feed if it would ensure that, but I'm not going to be upset at someone who wants him for dinner as long as they're honest about it.
 

Surbhi

In the Brooder
Jul 8, 2020
8
4
16
Update: He has a home!
hi! we are currently trying to find a home for two of our roos as well as we are not allowed to keep them in our area... I was just wondering, how did you find them a home? did you find someone willing on something like craigslist or was it something else? just wondering since we don't know where to give our roosters. Thanks!
 

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