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2 month old goose w/ developing egg and pnemonia. Please HELP!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by NapoleanGoose, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. NapoleanGoose

    NapoleanGoose Songster

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    Mar 4, 2010
    Bishop CA
    Yesterday this is what I posted but the conditions have changed so much I needed to make a new topic.

    She's at the vet tonight and they are giving her antibiotics. I believe they are putting her in an oxygen room, or at least she was put in one earlier. She's my 2 month old buff dewlap toulouse and she started having breathing problems about a week ago. She couldn't even stand still this morning, relaxed, without gasping and panting for air. I thought perhaps she might have had gapeworm or something but I wasn't sure. The vet says pnemonia. I haven't wormed my birds this year yet because I could only find a brand that doses for 100 chickens and I don't want to overdose my birds. Esp. since all my geese drink out of a creek and not out of a waterer. But I was thinking of doing Dicatomous Earth because we also have an ant problem in the sheds.

    Does anyone know, other then antibiotics, what should be done for a goose with pnemonia?

    Thank you.
    Sierra

    6/24 update
    No gapeworm. The vet took x-rays and turns out that she has a lumpy heart and lungs filled w/ liquid. Weirder yet, the 2 month gosling has an egg developing inside her. I am thinking that I should give the vet the ok to put her down. A bird specialist is 6 hours away but the bird cant breath outside of the oxygen chamber well because of her heart. Before I give the word to let her go tomorrow, can anyone tell me if it is worth it to let the vets keep working? Here in town, because I'm in FFA, I pay barely anything for vet bills but out of this town there will be no discounts and I'll have to face the full brunt of the vet fees. That is if she can even survive the ride there.

    She is a large dewlap Toulouse buff goose, and she's extremely rare. I was told that buffs make up less then 10% of the breed, and she is a very fine looking goose so far.
    I dont know what to do. Even if we take care of the egg, we have to deal with the pnemonia and possibly the heart. Nobody at this vet knows anything about birds, I would have to take her out of town for everything. Is she just a genetic oops? Does this have anything to do with my flock? Help!​
     

  2. NapoleanGoose

    NapoleanGoose Songster

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    Mar 4, 2010
    Bishop CA
    [​IMG] Please help! I'm having to put her down this morning, but I am worried it is connected to my flock or something! How could it have happened?
     
  3. MotherJean

    MotherJean Songster

    I'm sorry for your troubles, Napolean. You're doing the right thing to cull this bird in spite of the fact that it is a rare breed. If you're wanting to develop your flock of these rare ones, it's better to cull any that aren't in perfect health or up to breed standard. It is more likely that the defective heart caused the pneumonia than the other way around. Since there's no way to know whether this heart problem is the result of disease or genetics, you wouldn't want to use this bird for breeding even if it did survive. Don't jump to any conclusions about the rest of your birds based upon this one goose. Just continue good flock management while you wait and watch. If you don't see any other birds with similar health problems within the next couple of weeks (typical incubation period for many diseases), then you can probably assume that the heart problem was a genetic defect and not the result of disease. I hope that turns out to be the case.
     
  4. NapoleanGoose

    NapoleanGoose Songster

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    Mar 4, 2010
    Bishop CA
    Thank you
    We have put her down and the vet did an autopsy. They found that whatever it is, though they think it to be fungal, is viral/contagious. So now my flock of 72 birds are all on antibiotics, wormer, fungal medicine, ect. [​IMG]

    We haven't gotten the results back from the state lab yet, but I'll update this once they do. My other young buff is showing symptoms but none of my other chickens/turkeys/ect are even though they slept in the same shed, thank god. And hopefully it'll stay that way.

    Thanks again,
    Sierra
     
  5. MotherJean

    MotherJean Songster

    I think you did the right thing for your goose and for the rest of your flock. Knowledge is power and, at least, now you'll know exactly what was wrong and the precautions you need to take to try to protect the rest of your birds. Best of luck. Hoping your only losses will be the one goose.
     

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