2 roos fighting

chickengr

Free Ranging
6 Years
Dec 29, 2014
4,919
6,338
681
greece
hi,
I have 2 roos that grew up together. my avatar roo used to be alpha. after IB in my flock the other roo became alpha. but he lost some weight, he has had an issue with canker while my avatar roo got better. today I found them fighting to death. both of them were covered in blood. I separated them, wash them and put some iodine but at the end of the day put them both in the coop. they are sleeping now. will they calm down or they will kill each other? unfortunately I don't have the possibility to keep them separate.
 

beetandsteet

Songster
Aug 21, 2015
847
109
151
Texas!
There's an article in the latest issue of Backyard Poultry about keeping the peace with roosters in the flock, that I thought was really helpful. Here are some of the high points:
1. Mind your rooster-to-hen ratio. Too low a hen-to-cock ratio can cause fighting between cocks. The idea average ratio for lightweight laying breeds is 12 hens per cock
2. Roosters need their space. Make sure the lower-order cock has places to get away from the top man. "Multiple roosters in one flock are more likely to get along when they are not so crowded that they are always in each other's faces," the article says.
3. Add feeder and waterer stations, so each cock can take "his" group of hens to separate feeders and waterers. Position stations so each rooster can reach a station without having to pass through the other rooster's "territory."

Also, it is natural for roosters to fight to sort out pecking order issues. If they continue to fight, or begin to severely injure each other, you may want to put one or both of them down, and start over with another cockerels. Some roosters just get along with each other better than others. Also, it's always better to have three roosters instead of two. That third cock can help be a sort of "mediator" to the two that are sparring. Hope this helps, and that your roos settle down! :)
 
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chickengr

Free Ranging
6 Years
Dec 29, 2014
4,919
6,338
681
greece
There's an article in the latest issue of Backyard Poultry about keeping the peace with roosters in the flock, that I thought was really helpful. Here are some of the high points:
1. Mind your rooster-to-hen ratio. Too low a hen-to-cock ratio can cause fighting between cocks. The idea average ratio for lightweight laying breeds is 12 hens per cock
2. Roosters need their space. Make sure the lower-order cock has places to get away from the top man. "Multiple roosters in one flock are more likely to get along when they are not so crowded that they are always in each other's faces," the article says.
3. Add feeder and waterer stations, so each cock can take "his" group of hens to separate feeders and waterers. Position stations so each rooster can reach a station without having to pass through the other rooster's "territory."

Also, it is natural for roosters to fight to sort out pecking order issues. If they continue to fight, or begin to severely injure each other, you may want to put one or both of them down, and start over with another cockerels. Some roosters just get along with each other better than others. Also, it's always better to have three roosters instead of two. That third cock can help be a sort of "mediator" to the two that are sparring. Hope this helps, and that your roos settle down! :)

thank you.

I think my avatar roo somehow understands the other one got weak and that's why he was fighting. there is a cockerel with them but he is the last one in the pecking order and safe.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,200
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
There's an article in the latest issue of Backyard Poultry about keeping the peace with roosters in the flock, that I thought was really helpful. Here are some of the high points:
1. Mind your rooster-to-hen ratio. Too low a hen-to-cock ratio can cause fighting between cocks. The idea average ratio for lightweight laying breeds is 12 hens per cock
2. Roosters need their space. Make sure the lower-order cock has places to get away from the top man. "Multiple roosters in one flock are more likely to get along when they are not so crowded that they are always in each other's faces," the article says.
3. Add feeder and waterer stations, so each cock can take "his" group of hens to separate feeders and waterers. Position stations so each rooster can reach a station without having to pass through the other rooster's "territory."

Also, it is natural for roosters to fight to sort out pecking order issues. If they continue to fight, or begin to severely injure each other, you may want to put one or both of them down, and start over with another cockerels. Some roosters just get along with each other better than others. Also, it's always better to have three roosters instead of two. That third cock can help be a sort of "mediator" to the two that are sparring. Hope this helps, and that your roos settle down! :)
I suspect that by "mediator" what is meant is that he will step in and knock the snot out of one or the other cock, or if both of them stand up to him he will take on both roosters. A better term is an alpha rooster's alpha rooster.
 

chickengr

Free Ranging
6 Years
Dec 29, 2014
4,919
6,338
681
greece
thank god they don't fight today. but both of them look like returned from the war, lol.

thank you everyone. any information and suggestion about multiple roos are welcome (as I adore roos and I guess I will always have them).
 

beetandsteet

Songster
Aug 21, 2015
847
109
151
Texas!
I suspect that by "mediator" what is meant is that he will step in and knock the snot out of one or the other cock, or if both of them stand up to him he will take on both roosters. A better term is an alpha rooster's alpha rooster.
Haha that is true
lau.gif
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,200
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
thank you.

I think my avatar roo somehow understands the other one got weak and that's why he was fighting. there is a cockerel with them but he is the last one in the pecking order and safe.

I have rented free range runs aka walks in the country to raise free range chicks on. Often time there were already grown roosters and hens on the premises. After 30 years one barn yard stands out. I made the owner a deal and went to cleanse the tough old roosters already roosting there. I think that there were 15 mature roosters and only 3 hens. All the hens were sitting. I started with the oldest rooster first and shot him in the head with a .22 rim fire. All 14 of the under study roosters imminently jumped on the former cock of the walk before he was through flopping. To the best of my ability i shot every rooster in descending order. The other roosters all acted in the same fashion, they could not wait to get in their free licks on the former boss rooster.

Roosters and hens too are keen to take advantage of perceived or sudden onset weakness. Its just what they do.

PS: The roosters and hens were dressed and given to the farmstead owner.
 

chickengr

Free Ranging
6 Years
Dec 29, 2014
4,919
6,338
681
greece
I have rented free range runs aka walks in the country to raise free range chicks on. Often time there were already grown roosters and hens on the premises. After 30 years one barn yard stands out. I made the owner a deal and went to cleanse the tough old roosters already roosting there. I think that there were 15 mature roosters and only 3 hens. All the hens were sitting. I started with the oldest rooster first and shot him in the head with a .22 rim fire. All 14 of the under study roosters imminently jumped on the former cock of the walk before he was through flopping. To the best of my ability i shot every rooster in descending order. The other roosters all acted in the same fashion, they could not wait to get in their free licks on the former boss rooster.

Roosters and hens too are keen to take advantage of perceived or sudden onset weakness. Its just what they do.

PS: The roosters and hens were dressed and given to the farmstead owner.

I understand. although I didn't like the story
hit.gif


my chickens are my pets.
 

theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
May 11, 2010
31,689
16,754
867
Some people have tried a product called Pinless Peepers to help resolve aggression between roosters. These are basically like blinders on a horse. Some people think putting 'glasses' on chickens is cruel but other people are willing to try them to stop the fighting. Some owners have noted that some birds learn to see around them to fight.

Honestly, for the sake of your flock, it the fighting continues it would be kind to get rid of one rooster. I know this is difficult as your raised them as pets but remember chickens live by a different code-only the best, the strongest get the right to breed and have a flock.

Just imagine if you were being forced to live with your brother or sister in a tiny room for 24 hours a day. Even a saint would turn violent.

Good luck!
images
 

centrarchid

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Sep 19, 2009
26,386
17,760
856
Holts Summit, Missouri
I suggest constructing / acquiring an additional pen specifically to hold one of the roosters. A 4' x 5' pen with a cover and roosting pole will suffice. Confined bird will be better protected and serve as backup in the event other male fails. You could rotate which rooster is out on a given day. You may have to modify pen so birds will not fight through the wire.
 

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