2 sick hens, slightly different syptoms

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dac218, Jun 29, 2018.

  1. dac218

    dac218 In the Brooder

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    I have 2 hens, Stella and Super Chick (she got her name after being attacked by a husky and surviving... Supe for short) . Both are approaching 4yrs old. Supe showed symptoms first: stopped laying (was one of my best layers, RIR) swollen tummy, poop stuck to butt. She is active, eating and drinking as far as I can tell. Walks wide legged bc of swollen belly. Stella has never been a great layer, slowed down with age and also stopped laying all together. Her comb is pale and droopy. She stands like a penguin, not eating or drinking much and has watery green poop. I've treated for mites (cleaned coop, dusted birds with d.e. sprayed with clove oil) a few times, though I see no signs of mites in any of my 11 birds. I suspect that Supe has EYP, and Stella may be egg bound. Treated Supe with antibiotics for 3 days, no difference in swollen belly. All birds have access to oyster shells, and have been adding vitamins and electrolytes to water. Trying to remain as organic as possible, but these two are my oldest feathered friends and don't want to lose them. Any suggestions? Advice?
     
  2. Hen Pen Jem

    Hen Pen Jem Crowing

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    Greetings dac218,

    Your girls are swollen from ascite build up. This is the body's way of trying to rid itself of toxins building in the hen. They are at that age when a hen's reproductive system is exhausted. With care, they may get over this and go on to live more years. If cancer is involved, they can go into remission and have weeks to a year or a bit more.

    Here is the link to a the post I just wrote for another member. You will find treatments and other considerations for your hens in the post.

    www.backyardchickens.com/threads/best-way-to-grab-hold-carry-eyp-hen.1253350/#post-20114321


    If you have any questions, or would like to bounce some ideas off me, I will do my best to be helpful.

    God Bless. :)
     
    puffypoo22 and Cayuga momma like this.
  3. dac218

    dac218 In the Brooder

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    Jun 16, 2014
    Thank you so much for your quick reply! Checking it out now.
     
  4. dac218

    dac218 In the Brooder

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    Jun 16, 2014
    Would you suggest draining for acites?
     
  5. Hen Pen Jem

    Hen Pen Jem Crowing

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    Some keepers take the hen to a vet to drain the ascites, or they do it themselves. I never put any of my hens through that. The results are always the same, whether a vet does it, or the keeper.

    The ascites return just days later, or the hen dies in pain shortly after. :confused:
     
  6. dac218

    dac218 In the Brooder

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    Jun 16, 2014
    I am worried about it harming more than helping. Weighing my options. I'll try some antiinflammatory first. TY
     
  7. dac218

    dac218 In the Brooder

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    Jun 16, 2014
    Any one else with prior experience/results?? Homeopathic remedies that have worked or not?
     
  8. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Songster

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    Check out this video. You CAN do this in ONE poke for around $5 in supplies. If nothing else- you'll know what's in there and that can help you decide what's best for your girls.



    Find a 16 gauge needle- any farm store that sells cattle supplies should have one- and a syringe that takes a needle tip. If they have 14 gauge, even better. I had to order those online, but the 16's were in the store. 18's will work- but it will be harder to drain with thicker materials. The smaller the needle number (14, 16) the bigger the hole and the easier it is to drain. The bigger the needle number (18, 20) the smaller the needle hole and the harder to drain.

    If its thick and clumpy and yellow it's probably EYP- which is pretty much the end.

    If there's something basically clear from yellow to brown in color, it's probably a failing organ- but you can keep them comfortable with regular drainings.

    I hope that helps.
     
  9. dac218

    dac218 In the Brooder

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    Thank you! that will be my next step with Supe
     
  10. Hen Pen Jem

    Hen Pen Jem Crowing

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    Sup may have an atrophing oviduct, which in time will become non-functioning. She won't lay anymore eggs. If she has or has had a recent, neck or body molt, this may further indicate a problem with the oviduct. She may also lose some weigh, despite eating.

    Stella on the other hand, sounds like a more serious condition. Cancer of the oviduct may be her problem. Ascites, along with watery diarrhea is a common symptom that I have encountered in hens with slow growing oviduct tumors.

    1. I would treat both with the aspirin for 7 days, then stop for a day, then resume for another week. Always give aspirin prior to feeding, as food is needed as a buffer for the intestines.
    2. Stella should be treated with 50 mg. Doxycycline, once a day. To prevent infection during her recovery, since her immune system is suppressed.
    3. Next, both should have an Epsom Salt soak at least once a week, two would be better.
    4. Keep the vents clean, to prevent vent gleet, if the hen has diarrhea or sticky poops.
    5. The Rub Arnica cream, for discomfort and detox.
    6. Increase the protein for both hens. Meat proteins are best.
    7. The addition of herbs to boost the immune system: Ashwaganda and/or echinacea powders, 1/8 tsp. sprinkled on food, or, made into a suspension then, administered by syringe. A cup of echinacea tea, can also be made and diluted in 2 quarts of water for drinking daily.

    Nourishment is very important, so you'll have to make sure they eat.

    I know this is alarming to have two hens with reproductive issues. I just went through this with the two hens I talked about in the post. But, the symptom of ascites, is so common.

    Many hens get sick and die. And, most keepers really don't know why their hens died, because without a necropsy there is now way to know for sure. And keepers that do their own necropsy, only know what they see. They don't run tissue analysis, to determine the cause of the tumors. Did the hen have Lymphoid Leukosis (which may cause tumors) or a spontaneous ovarian cancer, like my young hen?

    There are many things that cause ascites, only a CBC test on a living chicken, will tell you if a chicken has a tumor. Then, you can decide to care for the hen or cull her.

    Anyways, that's my five cents worth of thoughts. I sincerely hope and pray, for your hens to have more splendid days, in the sun!

    God Bless :)
     

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