2 Week old Chick with possible resp. infect. NEED IMMEDIATE ADVICE FOR TREATING

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Then I Will, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. Then I Will

    Then I Will Songster

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    This morning I noticed one of my Salmon Favorolle chicks had watery eyes with clear bubbles in the corner. After a moment of examination she sneezed and generally appears ill.
    She is in a brooder box with 7 other birds- one like herself, one EE, and 5 Black Sumatras. All 2 weeks old. Because this hatchery batch suffered so many losses, I have a separate brooder box full of Sumatras from a different hatchery across the room (1 week old now). My intention was to have one happy flock soon, but seeing as respiratory illness is so contagious- anyone in the box of 8 possibly infection birds would be a carrier to the 13 other birds!!! :barnie

    I administer injections to people, so I'm fairly confident I could vaccinate my birds if I had to. But I'm not sure what the right course of action would be for 1 week and 2 week old chicks.
    I have the sick bird separated, but I can't possibly keep her out forever. No more brooder boxes or lamps and what not to keep her warm overnight.

    Considering most, if not all 8 of the other birds are probably already infected, I would be interested in just treating all of them. But seeing as how I want and need to combine the two batches of hatchery birds, I am looking for a way to treat all of them.

    I have a TSC near me, so hopefully I will make it out today for treatment options.
    Thanks in advance,
    Laurisa
     
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  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    It does sound like she may have a respiratory disease - Mycoplasma, Infectious Bronchitis and ILT are fairly common. Antibiotics can help with secondary infections, but won't cure the illness. As you mention - I think you understand about carriers.

    Treat only birds that are showing symptoms of illness - in your case, it sounds like you currently only have one. You are right in assuming that the others are most likely exposed, so if no one is picking on her, she essentially could be housed with them.

    Injectable Tylan50 can be used to treat secondary infections from respiratory illness. Dosage is 1 cc or ml per 5lbs of weight 2X per day for 5days. You can give it orally or as an injection into the breast muscle 1/4 inch deep.

    Encourage her to stay hydrated and watch to see that she is eating well. If she continually has bubbles in the eyes, you may want to flush them out atleast once a day with saline - hopefully this will help keep them clear and they won't swell as much or form pus.

    Keep us posted.

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
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  3. Then I Will

    Then I Will Songster

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    Thanks for the helpful and encouraging reply Wyorp Rock.
    Husband wants to cull the sick bird instead of putting money into it.
    Currently, I'm more distraught about the possibility of her or another chick coming down with it, being a carrier and infecting the entire flock. I'm washing my hands between handling of the two flocks to prevent cross contamination.
    Her poo is still normal by the way, so I am going to hope it is only Infectious bronchitis.
     
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  4. DocBirdBrain

    DocBirdBrain Songster

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    As of this January, antibiotics for food animals (including chickens, and even honeybees) are no longer available over the counter, you will have to get a prescription.

    Your plan of supportive care for the one showing clinical signs, and maintaining strict hygiene between flocks, is a good one.

    Best of luck to you, and keep us posted!
     
  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Depending on what your goals are, culling is an option. I know that sounds a bit harsh, but for breeding, selling/trading/giving away hatching eggs, chicks, started pullets, etc. a lot of people do cull. This does not mean that the other birds are not carriers though. It also really stems on what respiratory disease you are dealing with as well. Even Infectious Bronchitis can come with it's own set of problems later down the road - reduction in production and egg quality issues.

    If you do end up losing her - sending her for necropsy would be a good idea. This will give you the information needed to make sound decisions regarding moving forward with any special projects that you have in mind. Some states perform necropsies for a nominal fee while others can be expensive, this is something you may want to investigate.

    I understand the $$$ can add up quickly, so I do see your husband's point of view. Tylan50 is usually around $25.00, which sometimes (for me at least) has to be considered. You could try something like VetRX - it's a "natural remedy" that may help alleviate some of her symptoms - it's around $7.99 - so that is a big price difference. Both Tylan50 and VetRX can be found at Tractor Supply or online.

    I'm so sorry that you are having difficulties. It can be hard to know which direction to go. Whatever decisions you make will be the right one for your circumstances:hugs
     
  6. Then I Will

    Then I Will Songster

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    We just found this out from the feed store. Very unfortunate as this makes it very difficult for any noncommercial livestock owner to doctor their sick animals. We just heard from one employee that fish antibiotics can be used for the chickens, but the dosage would need to be guesstimated using best judgement. Any thoughts on that?
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Enlightened

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    Did you know that antibiotics are still available without a prescription?
     
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  8. casportpony

    casportpony Enlightened

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    Injectables are still OTC. Fish antibiotics can be used, as can bird and pigeon antibiotics, but you would have to order them. Denagard for swine is an option as well (Denagard is approved for use in laying hens in the UK). You have lots of choices for threating with medication if that's what you want to do.
     
  9. Then I Will

    Then I Will Songster

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    Thanks for this, casportpony!! I had to order my birds before a sooner deadline than originally intended so we've been in a rush to finish the coop and all. I will be looking into these as I put together my First Aid kit for the birds. Currently, Tetracycline for fish is all I can get my hands on, but I will look into the other options for future maladies. My birds are more ornamental than layers (Long tail fowl), so I'm not currently concerned about organic treatments vs. modern medicine. Your reply was also very helpful.
     
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  10. casportpony

    casportpony Enlightened

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    If you suspect Mycoplasma and they are more pets than food animals, you could use Baytril. It's banned for use in poultry, but you can get it without a prescription for birds and pigeons. Let me know if you want more info on this. Personally, I wouldn't waste my money on tetracycline because most of the time it's ineffective.
     
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