2 weird questions

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by tay_boe, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. tay_boe

    tay_boe Chillin' With My Peeps

    495
    0
    109
    Aug 27, 2010
    I've been noticing that my silkies and showgirl hens are always walking around the pen looking for any feathers or straw and when they find it they pick it up and put it on top of their backs! Why are they doing this? They have a nesting and dusting area.

    Also I have 2 Roos in one of my pens that aren't breeding the hens. All of the eggs are infertile. Can anyone think of any tricks to get em working again?[​IMG]

    Thanks!
     
  2. CCourson05

    CCourson05 Popping like kettle corn...

    Jan 5, 2011
    Hickory Flat, MS
    Mine do this upon occasion and they really do it when they are starting to go broody and start settling down in a nesting box... My only guess is she is trying to hide herself and her eggs from predators.

    Is the roo too young?[​IMG]
     
  3. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Agreed. Many breeders of fluffy fowl trim the fluff around the vent area to allow better acces on both male and females. Ages please?........Pop
     
  4. tay_boe

    tay_boe Chillin' With My Peeps

    495
    0
    109
    Aug 27, 2010
    Quote:Agreed. Many breeders of fluffy fowl trim the fluff around the vent area to allow better acces on both male and females. Ages please?........Pop

    Will they go broody when it's getting cold out? I mean its getting down to the 60s at night that's a big difference!
    My youngest roo has been crowing for a few months now. The thing is my older roo has produced chicks before. He seemed to be a lot more "active" when he free ranged. Since I put him in a breeding pen he has just stopped! Should I take him out and see if the younger roo becomes dominant?
     
  5. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Agreed. Many breeders of fluffy fowl trim the fluff around the vent area to allow better acces on both male and females. Ages please?........Pop

    Will they go broody when it's getting cold out? I mean its getting down to the 60s at night that's a big difference!
    My youngest roo has been crowing for a few months now. The thing is my older roo has produced chicks before. He seemed to be a lot more "active" when he free ranged. Since I put him in a breeding pen he has just stopped! Should I take him out and see if the younger roo becomes dominant?

    Some will get broody in extremely cold weather. doesn`t mean the chicks will survive, but most can handle it down in the 30`s with a good mom. The older rooster is probably still active, but sometimes it`s hard to catch them. Don`t give up on him yet. Trim those vents with a good pair of scissors and see what happens..........Pop
     
  6. tay_boe

    tay_boe Chillin' With My Peeps

    495
    0
    109
    Aug 27, 2010
    Quote:Will they go broody when it's getting cold out? I mean its getting down to the 60s at night that's a big difference!
    My youngest roo has been crowing for a few months now. The thing is my older roo has produced chicks before. He seemed to be a lot more "active" when he free ranged. Since I put him in a breeding pen he has just stopped! Should I take him out and see if the younger roo becomes dominant?

    Some will get broody in extremely cold weather. doesn`t mean the chicks will survive, but most can handle it down in the 30`s with a good mom. The older rooster is probably still active, but sometimes it`s hard to catch them. Don`t give up on him yet. Trim those vents with a good pair of scissors and see what happens..........Pop

    I'll do it! Thanks!! [​IMG]
     

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