20 week old wyandotte not eating

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mikaelB, Aug 24, 2013.

  1. mikaelB

    mikaelB Out Of The Brooder

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    Dear all,
    I bought a really beautiful wyandotte two weeks ago but since a few days she practically stopped eating and is just sitting there, asleep outside. When it rains she doesn't even go inside for shelter. She's 20 weeks old now, no eggs yet. I just wonder what it would be? She does not cough, no swollen eyes or something like that. She refused all food today, but she still drinks water.
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    It sounds like it could be Coccidiosis, which is a disease of the intestinal tract caused by protozoa. Coccidiosis causes sleepiness, droopiness, lack of appetite, paleness, and sometimes bloody droppings. To treat it, you need to get a Coccidiostat. Corid(Amprolium) is the best medication. If you get Corid liquid, the dosage is 2 teaspoons per gallon of water given for five days, and if you get Corid powder, the dosage is 3/4 teaspoon per gallon of water given for the same amount of time.

    Coccidiostats work by depriving the protozoa of Vitamin B1 (Riboflavin); it is a Vitamin B inhibitor. Because of this, it can cause nutrient deficiencies. So, it is a good idea to give your chicken vitamins after the treatment, but don't give them during the treatment. Some other things to not give during the treatment are apple cider vinegar and dairy products.

    Hope this helps!
     
  3. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    It sounds to me like she could have Coccidiosis. I'd purchase some Corid (you can usually find it a livestock supply store--its often sold for cattle), and start treating her. The 9.6% Corid liquid dosage is 1/2 teaspoon liquid per quart of drinking water. The 20% Corid powder dosage is 3/4 teaspoon powder per gallon of drinking water. Replace the water daily, and continue treating for 5-7 days. Improvement is usually seen after the first 3 days. Do not give vitamins during Corid treatment, as they will interfere with the treatment.

    She could also be egg bound. Try lubricating your finger with Petroleum Jelly/Vaseline and sticking it into her vent. Feel for any hard things that could be eggs or egg shells. If you feel something, give her a warm (90-95 degree F.) bath. This should help her relax, and cause the egg to be laid.

    Also, what does her crop feel like (is it hard, large and squishy, etc.)? Does she walk alright, without waddling like a penguin or limping?

    If I were you, I would isolate your bird. Being out in the rain, or in the coop with all of the other birds will not help her recover. Keep her in a warm, dry, clean place, and minimize external stresses (animals walking around, temperature fluctuations, etc.). If possible, you need to get your pullet eating. See if she'll eat scrambled eggs, fresh fruit, mealworms, applesauce, yogurt, or moistened feed. If she won't eat, then dissolve some feed in water and spoon feed it to her. She needs nutrients, or she'll get weaker. Perhaps put some probiotics and sugar in her water to give her an extra boost.

    Hope I've helped! And that your pullet feels better. [​IMG]
     
  4. mikaelB

    mikaelB Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for your replies. She is not walking a lot now; she just sits there, eyes closed. The eyes are clear, no discharge. Is the Coccidiosis deadly? I don't have access to a shop right now, anything else that could help?
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Keep her warm and hydrated.
     
  6. mikaelB

    mikaelB Out Of The Brooder

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    Dear all,
    I think I just found out what causes it. My wife just told me she fed her some raw meat yesterday (!). One should never do that as it can hold all sort of bacteria of course!
    I put her inside her house, refreshed the water (some apple vinegar in it) and removed the droppings I could find. I noticed she might have diarrea. What a mess.
     
  7. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    That could be what is causing her to be ill, but I'm not 100% sure of that. Chickens can, and do, eat raw meat, even on their own. They will catch a stray mouse, frog/toad, or snake if it crosses their path. And they will even cannibalize other injured chickens.

    But if the meat was spoiled, or contained large amounts of bacteria, then it would have adverse effects on your pullet. I don't see what else you can do other than keep her warm and hydrated, and hope that she recovers.
     
  8. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes.Coccidiosis is very deadly. Forum members have given the medication dosage. Some symptoms of cocci are runny/watery poop(may or may not contain blood,depends on which of the 9 strains it is)fluffed feathers,lethargic,not eating/drinking,weight loss,general look of unwell. Treating her for cocci will not harm her,but not treating(if she has cocci)may result in her death. I believe you can give buttermilk(coats the intestines) in a cocci emergency until you get medication. Search forums for emergency foods to give for cocci. If she shows no improvement,get the Corid ASAP.
     
  9. mikaelB

    mikaelB Out Of The Brooder

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    Put her inside, in the house, warm and dry. Gave clean water + feed,she did drink and eat now. Hope she gets well.
     
  10. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Unless the meat was spoiled I'd be a little surprised if that is the cause. I'd be very suspicious of cocci however, especially since she is young and new to your property. If it were my bird I'd be treating for it to be on the safe side. It is indeed deadly and it moves fast, once the bird has sustained a certain amount of intestinal damage then you won't be able to save them. It's worth ruling it out rather then potentially loosing a bird to something that is very treatable if caught in the early stages.
     

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