?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by shookpoultry, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. shookpoultry

    shookpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    128
    8
    144
    May 26, 2007
    Claremont, NC
    deleted
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2007
  2. johnnyjack

    johnnyjack Chillin' With My Peeps

    810
    0
    149
    Oct 21, 2007
    usa
    wish ya luck on this. i know its bad here in the upstate of sc also.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2007
  3. shookpoultry

    shookpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    128
    8
    144
    May 26, 2007
    Claremont, NC
    deleted
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2007
  4. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    It's no conspiracy - THERE IS NO HAY!

    People aren't just price gouging this stuff, it's just the simple fact that the extreme drought over the last few years killed cuttings. Therefore, no hay.

    Did you take economics? The answer to all of your questions/problems is supply and demand.

    Just for your reference, even though I'm not in NC...I am paying $80 for a commercial 600 lb. round roll of horse quality fescue. I can find smaller rolls of borderline HQ hay for $60-70 each.
     
  5. shookpoultry

    shookpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    128
    8
    144
    May 26, 2007
    Claremont, NC
    deleted
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2007
  6. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    For reference:

    We shipped a semi load of alfalfa here from our family in southern Illinois.

    FREIGHT was $1200, THREE years ago.

    Yeah, they have $20 round bales there, too. Today, freight to haul them here would run us about $48 PER BALE. Add the cost of the bale and voila - you're paying nearly $100 per bale.

    Feed stores and suppliers have to mark up in order to pay themselves for the work involved in hauling hay cross country. Trust me, after arranging delivery of our alfalfa, it's not as easy as you assume. They have to make a living, too.

    So, best of luck.
     
  7. ncgnance

    ncgnance Chillin' With My Peeps

    517
    1
    151
    Aug 22, 2007
    Iredell County, NC
    Here's how you get it there. I'm from nc, working in florida. I have rented a u-haul to take about 50 square bales or so back home with me. I found it for $5.50/bale. Prices they are charging reminds me of those who sell water during a hurricane for $10/gal. I believe in a fair profit, but, please.......
     
  8. johnnyjack

    johnnyjack Chillin' With My Peeps

    810
    0
    149
    Oct 21, 2007
    usa
    i dont know if this will help ya or not. first time iv ever saw it done but today this guy has bought about 2 tractor tailer loads of corn stalks in round bails he is putting some kinda molasses and vitamin mix in it they said they inject the mix into the center of the bail and the corn stalks soak up the mix. new one on me but hey if it works it maybe an alternative to hay when ya cant get it. didnt get the price. this is at hwy 176 and interstae 26 near spartanburg.sc. what ya think.
     
  9. Wildsky

    Wildsky Wild Egg!

    11,973
    13
    313
    Oct 13, 2007
    California
    Well I'll delete my post as well............ ?
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2007
  10. michaelvcrowder

    michaelvcrowder Chillin' With My Peeps

    101
    0
    119
    Nov 26, 2007
    gainesville georgia
    ever seen what a load of seasoned hardwood will bring in kolo"rad"o? when i realized what they will pay for good fire wood i tried to send a truck out there and the plan was to back haul some hay. won't ever try that again. the fuel ate us alive and that was when diesel was less than 2 bucks a gallon.

    if you really want to move a large amount at a reasonable price then a rail car would be your best bet. but you have to schedule months in advance and have the ability to get it off the rail car and off the terminal property in a timely manner.

    if you want to try getting it hauled look for truckers that are needing a backhaul to the house. you ctch the right situation you can get a load hauled just for the price of the fuel. we got an antique high crop tractor made for the sugar can fields hauled here to georgia from san diego for 1200 bucks just because the driver wanted to get home for a few days and that was what the fuel cost to get here.
    michael
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by