1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

250 watt ceramic heat emitter... Too warm?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Nicole01, Sep 10, 2011.

  1. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

    5,493
    58
    268
    Mar 28, 2011
    MN
    I just purchased a 250 watt ceramic heat emitter for my coop that is 12x4x8. My dh is very worried that the 250 watts is too warm for the coop. The temps get as low as -20F or more. I'm not planning on using the heat lamp until it gets really cold and subzero temps. We are only needing the coop warm enough to keep the water from freezing.

    Is my dh right? Is the 250 watt too warm? Should I resell the ceramic heat lamp and buy a 100-150? This is our first winter with our chickens. We are boarding up 3/4 of the run, so they can use it all winter. I can't imagine them getting along peacefully in the coop alone. My RIR can be a big crab at times.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Iheartchicks<3:)

    Iheartchicks<3:) Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 1, 2010
    Mount Vernon, WA
    Depends on how big, and how much ventilation your coop has..
     
  3. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,495
    14
    246
    Jun 20, 2009
    Orange County, NY
    Honestly, I don't use heat at all - I find I have more problems in hot weather than in cold, and it has reached way below zero here.
     
  4. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

    5,545
    223
    288
    Mar 31, 2008
    Grifton NC
    You can control lthe heat based on how far you put it from the waterer.

    If you want it close, it's bigger than you need.

    If you want it to warm the whole coop, it probably won't make a lot of difference
     
  5. kittycooks

    kittycooks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hi Nicole, I'm from MN too! I read that ceramic heaters are a fire hazard and must be placed very carefully. If you chose winter hardy birds they really don't need heat, just protection from wind and wet. A heated dog bowl (about $10.00 from Menards or Fleet Farm) works great for the water. It also costs less to heat than a 250 watt ceramic heater! Check out these ideas:
    [http://www.kittycooks.com/how-to-winterize-your-chicken-coop.html]winterize your coop[/url]
     
  6. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    No, I don't think it'll keep your coop terribly warm...maybe if your coop is insulated better than a house and had no ventilation - but I doubt that's the case. If you main goal is to keep water liquid, you could get by with less as long as the lamp was hanging over the water.
    Also, look up Thermocube - you can plug your heating device into it and it ONLY turns your device on when the temp falls to a certain level (off about 10 degrees higher). They have models that come on at 10, 20, 35, etc....maybe a zero too??? They also have hot weather models for fans and such. They're about $15.
     
  7. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

    5,493
    58
    268
    Mar 28, 2011
    MN
    What about an oil heated radiator with adjustable heat? There is one on sale for 29.99 in one of the flyer adds. They heat from the ground up. Our coop is very well insulated. This looks much safer.
     
  8. True Grit

    True Grit Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think that would be great for your size of coop. 250 watts isn't too much at all for your size of coop but I think they get even hotter than the light bulbs although it seems to be a gentler heat. Mine last year seemed to melt the metal on the end of the bulb.
     
  9. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

    5,719
    42
    283
    May 8, 2007
    Wisconsin
    We don't use heat in the coop, unless we're brooding chicks out there. As long as they're fully feathered, just keeping them out of any drafts, while still allowing ventilation, seems to work fine for them.

    We use a built in or added heater designed to keep the water unfrozen. We've used different types at various times and they've all worked fine for us. I like to have them on bricks, concrete blocks or a concrete patio tile, rather than directly on the litter. That's just to be extra safe.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by