2nd litter of kits... Is it a peanut?

Laineybug

Chirping
Nov 29, 2015
27
42
94
hello. My 1 1/2 year old minirex rabbit just gave birth to 2 rabbits however 1 is only alive. The one that passed is bigger than the alive one. Many other people I have talked to said that the alive baby is a peanut and will not survive. However I am willing to try and do anything to help out that baby. Also does anybody know a good size for a newborn kit? Thank you. I will try again later but ny image isn't uploading...
 

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Bunnylady

POOF Goes the Pooka
10 Years
Nov 27, 2009
18,489
7,806
571
Wilmington, NC
I'm sorry, but based on the shape of the head, as well as its size and proportions, I have to agree with those other people. A friend used to call peanuts "camel babies," because the domed forehead and shortened face somehow reminded her of a camel. A newborn Mini Rex should be about 2 1/2 inches long.
 

cassie

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,095
2,246
401
I'm sorry, but based on the shape of the head, as well as its size and proportions, I have to agree with those other people. A friend used to call peanuts "camel babies," because the domed forehead and shortened face somehow reminded her of a camel. A newborn Mini Rex should be about 2 1/2 inches long.
Please tell me exactly what a peanut is. I know they are small, deformed, and do not survive, but that is about it. What causes the condition? Is it a random defect or the result of a homozygous lethal gene or what?
 

Bunnylady

POOF Goes the Pooka
10 Years
Nov 27, 2009
18,489
7,806
571
Wilmington, NC
Please tell me exactly what a peanut is. I know they are small, deformed, and do not survive, but that is about it. What causes the condition? Is it a random defect or the result of a homozygous lethal gene or what?
Certain breeds of rabbit (Netherland Dwarf, Holland Lop, Mini Rex, etc) employ the dwarfing gene to get the compact, tiny animal that is described in their breed standards. Without the dwarfing gene, they would still be small, but they would be perhaps a pound heavier than the standard calls for and have slightly longer proportions (longer face, longer ears, longer limbs and body). The dwarfing gene is a dominant gene; if a bunny inherits it, you will see the result. Unfortunately, it is also a homozygous lethal gene. So,without the dwarfing gene, you get slightly oversized false dwarfs. With one copy of the dwarfing gene, you get correctly proportioned true dwarfs. Breed two true dwarfs together, and there's a chance that some of the offspring will inherit the dwarfing gene from both parents; those are what get referred to as peanuts. In addition to being only about 2/3 the size of their viable siblings, peanuts' hind ends are often rather pinched looking, and they may not have control of their hind legs. Though they may be born alive, most peanuts have incomplete digestive systems, so they typically die within 3 days of birth.
 
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cassie

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,095
2,246
401
Certain breeds of rabbit (Netherland Dwarf, Holland Lop, Mini Rex, etc) employ the dwarfing gene to get the compact, tiny animal that is described in their breed standards. Without the dwarfing gene, they would still be small, but they would be perhaps a pound heavier than the standard calls for and have slightly longer proportions (longer face, longer ears, longer limbs and body). The dwarfing gene is a dominant gene; if a bunny inherits it, you will see the result. Unfortunately, it is also a homozygous lethal gene. So,without the dwarfing gene, you get slightly oversized false dwarfs. With one copy of the dwarfing gene, you get correctly proportioned true dwarfs. Breed two true dwarfs together, and there's a chance that some of the offspring will inherit the dwarfing gene from both parents; those are what get referred to as peanuts. In addition to being only about 2/3 the size of their viable siblings, peanuts' hind ends are often rather pinched looking, and they may not have control of their hind legs. Though they may be born alive, most peanuts have incomplete digestive systems, so they typically die within 3 days of birth.
Thank you. That explains it.
 

BallyFarm

Songster
Nov 28, 2019
135
363
126
PA
Thank you. That explains it.
Did baby end up making it? I feel as this winter season has been really rough on does and kits. I lost a whole litter to peanuts, and the one that survived is a little special... she is sweet but definitely not your normal bunny.
 
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