2nd Update on big cut from earlobe to earlobe across back of head/neck

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by FrenchHen, Apr 21, 2009.

  1. FrenchHen

    FrenchHen Chicken Ambassador

    Jan 26, 2009
    Bagshot Row
    I was feeding scratch and noticed the splash Andalusian wasn't around. I opened the door to the coop and she was tucked in a corner.

    She let me catch her, but she was pretty resistant to being put in the dog carrier.

    She's got a cut from earlobe to earlobe across the back of her head. I can't tell if it's deep or if it's puffy. I think it's pretty shallow and puffy, as in I wouldn't go for stitches if it were my hand.

    Near as I can tell, she got her head caught in something.

    Would chicken wire do this?

    She's isolated, but won't let me touch her. I'm assuming that's a good sign.

    My plan is to keep her in the dog crate until she's scabbed over to make sure she doesn't get pecked at too badly.

    Should I put antibiotics in the water?

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2009
  2. emilyweck

    emilyweck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 9, 2009
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    I would put antibiotics in the water and neosporin (without pain killer) on the wound. Whatever cut her was probably pretty dirty and you wouldn't want it to become a staph infection.
     
  3. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    South Georgia
    Since the wound does not appear deep enough to suture, I probably would not. I would probably go with Neosporin on the wound, plus confinement, rest, etc.

    I would imagine chicken wire could indeed do this, if the holes are big enough for them to get their head through. Mine love to put their head through fencing if they can. I have some 18" high, inexpensive chicken wire that has 1" holes. I would probably tack it up along the bottom so that the holes did not match, so it would hopefully prevent their heads from getting through. Just an example.
     
  4. FrenchHen

    FrenchHen Chicken Ambassador

    Jan 26, 2009
    Bagshot Row
    Ick. I don't know how well she's going to take to confinement. She's feisty.

    Still, I'll be a responsible chicken keeper and put the neosporin on when she settles for the night.
     
  5. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    emilyweck posted while I was writing. Systemic antibiotics are often debatable. Your choice.
     
  6. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:If she has been with them since the injury occurred and they have not attacked the wound, I would personally take that as an indication that she might not need to be isolated. Chickens tend to peck at anything bloody and make it much worse, in case that is not something you already know, but it is not necessarily always the case. Chickens are pretty resilient. If the wound is not deep, it might very well heat without intervention.

    Though I would personally get the Neosporin on her if I could manage it.

    Go with what feels best to you.
     
  7. FrenchHen

    FrenchHen Chicken Ambassador

    Jan 26, 2009
    Bagshot Row
    Ok, so I went to put on the antibiotic, and it's much worse than I thought. It's gaping and it's clear through the skin. When she bends down it opens up nearly a half inch.

    I'm not taking her to the vet for stitches, and I couldn't manage the neosporin. She pecked me when I gave her water!

    Feisty one, she is.

    At this point, I've given her water with antibiotics in it (I figure it can't hurt) and I'll keep her isolated for a couple of days to see how it heals.

    I am so not good at this stuff...[​IMG]
     
  8. idajack

    idajack Out Of The Brooder

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    Could you possibly hood her head with a handkerchief or something to allow you to treat the wound?
    Does anyone have experience with superglue as a homemade suture for something like this?
     
  9. alasmith32

    alasmith32 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 25, 2009
    Madera, Ca
    Superglue will work if you can get her to hold still long enough to put the glue on and hold the wound closed. It burns a bit, so she'll probably be even more fiesty.
     
  10. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Wounds more than a very few hours old should not normally be sutured; just sews infection in. They need to heel from the inside, by scarring over.
     

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