2x4 or 2x6 for roof of run?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by lm84, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. lm84

    lm84 Chirping

    103
    5
    71
    Dec 3, 2013
    New Jersey
    We are currently building our run, 20x12, with 4x4s spaced 48in on center. The hardware cloth will be ran vertically down the 4x4s. We are doing welded wire for the roof, but eventually will put plastic roofing on. We are in NJ and get decent snow in the winter. Should I do 12 ft 2x4s across as roof supports between the 4x4s or something bigger like 2x6s? Only reason for not choosing something bigger than 2x4 would be that they will be significantly cheaper if I can get away with them. But I want to do it right and if 2x6 would be way better, I'll do them. Any suggestions?
     
  2. lm84

    lm84 Chirping

    103
    5
    71
    Dec 3, 2013
    New Jersey
    Here is a picture of the start of the run, there will be 2x4s across the top and bottoms of the posts to attach the hardware cloth to and for added strength.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. J at Yoti Farms

    J at Yoti Farms In the Brooder

    34
    1
    23
    Jul 19, 2014
    Wanamaker, IN
    What pitch ?
     
  4. Sseckel

    Sseckel Songster

    164
    41
    116
    Oct 20, 2013
    Homestead, IA
    Because you get snow and are planning a solid roof, the pitch of the roof will be more important than the size of boards you use. Even a 2x6 with a plastic roof wont support a heavy snow load if your roof is flat. It needs to be able to slide off to shed the weight. That being said I think you would be just fine with a 2x4 so long as you do a strong grid to support the plastic.

    Am I safe in assuming that you are doing a corrugated plastic roof? right now my coop roof is temporary but it is made of 2x2s with 1/4"plywood (yes 1/4" scary I know) and a 4:12 pitch. It has withstood one winter (we average 30" of snowfall, we had much more this past year) but I will have the corrugated plastic on before this winter hits. I never intended it to go through the winter undone, but my girls didn't seem bothered and they stayed dry.
    Happy building, it looks great so far!
     
  5. lm84

    lm84 Chirping

    103
    5
    71
    Dec 3, 2013
    New Jersey
    Yes, we will be doing the corrugated plastic roofing. But it isn't in the budget just yet so we are building the roof flat with the welded wire and hopefully before winter we will add wood to slant the roof for the panels. I just want to make sure if I do 2x4s that later I won't regret it when adding the roof and wish I had done something bigger.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2014
  6. Sseckel

    Sseckel Songster

    164
    41
    116
    Oct 20, 2013
    Homestead, IA
    I think you will be fine with 2x4s so long as they are closer than 48" apart. Also if you want to make things cheaper you can do a single slope of the roof and basically cut out the eve cost. Makes construction easier too. Just a thought. Good luck!
     
  7. recfsh

    recfsh In the Brooder

    26
    7
    26
    Mar 31, 2012
    I'm in nj too and would not use 2 x 4's unless it was a very steep pitch. 2 x 6's will carry much more load.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. thomasboyle

    thomasboyle Songster 5 Years

    929
    267
    166
    Feb 28, 2013
    Northwest Hills of CT
    Living in NJ, you can get 18-20" of snow, so I would go with 2x6's. I live in CT and have a slightly larger run with 15' span with 1 foot overhang on the end. 15' is too long for a 2x6 (in houses, 2x6 is only rated for 8' spans) I put in a mid point support, and I don't have to worry about snow anymore. You can put them on 18" centers without issue. The increase in cost of 2x6's over 2x4's is small compared to having to rebuilding the run if it were to collapse under a snow load.
     
  9. lm84

    lm84 Chirping

    103
    5
    71
    Dec 3, 2013
    New Jersey
    Thanks everyone, I went out tonight and got the 2x6!
     
  10. bigmrg74

    bigmrg74 Songster

    1,542
    472
    226
    Jan 28, 2014
    Clinton Michigan
    yep, when it comes to something that's going to be load bearing, it never hurts to go with something a little more beefier than what you can get away with. Getting away with something might work for a while, but the failure rate is something that you would have to worry about in the long run.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: