3 easter egger chicks - is 1 a rooster?

Which is correct?

  • Not sure about 1 and 3 but 2 is definitely a rooster

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • All three are pullets

    Votes: 5 100.0%
  • There is more than one rooster in this brude

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 1 and 3 are for sure pullets 2 is for sure a rooster

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    5

kylemsenger

Chirping
Sep 7, 2018
27
51
69
Northeast Ohio
We have three easter egger chicks, which from my research seem to be the hardest to sex when they are young.
Since about 3 days old I suspected one of them may be a rooster. IMPOSSIBLE to tell i know but she was always larger, started to feather faster and when her sisters started to feather and grow they have never caught up, at 5 weeks this chick has a larger body, larger pea comb, larger and differently shaped tail feathers, even her head just looks more masculine to me! but I know that since e.e. don't conform to a true breed standard and are a result of mixing different types of chickens, they can have varied characteristics.
Heres the thing tho I can't have a rooster where I live and if she is a he I
would like to get rid of her and replace her with another pullet while everyone is still relatively young.
PLEASE HELP!

I believe 1 and 3 are def. pullets
Number 2 is our suspected cockrel
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coach723

Free Ranging
7 Years
Feb 12, 2015
7,290
12,076
621
North Florida
You are right, EE's can be hard to tell. At this point they all look like pullets to me. Do you have room for 4 birds? You could add one now, and then still have 3 if it turns out to be a cockerel. I would wait longer before deciding it's a cockerel. I have one bird, EE/wyandotte mix, that I was SURE was a cockerel all along. Nope, she's a she, a testy cantankerous one. I wasn't really convinced until nearly point of lay. Mixed breeds can fool you. When in doubt, wait.
 

kylemsenger

Chirping
Sep 7, 2018
27
51
69
Northeast Ohio
You are right, EE's can be hard to tell. At this point they all look like pullets to me. Do you have room for 4 birds? You could add one now, and then still have 3 if it turns out to be a cockerel. I would wait longer before deciding it's a cockerel. I have one bird, EE/wyandotte mix, that I was SURE was a cockerel all along. Nope, she's a she, a testy cantankerous one. I wasn't really convinced until nearly point of lay. Mixed breeds can fool you. When in doubt, wait.
Great advice! I do just barely have room for one more at the moment but this is my first year with chickens, If all goes well this winter I will likely add a larger coop to my run and at least double (possibly triple) my flock. I know this is a major pain (introducing young pullets to adult birds) but I may just wait for one of the hens to go broody and go with eggs this time around (and an easier to sex breed of chicken! lol)
 

coach723

Free Ranging
7 Years
Feb 12, 2015
7,290
12,076
621
North Florida
If you hatch eggs you are going to end up with a fair amount of cockerels, so have a plan for what you will do with them. I usually have no trouble integrating new birds, I just let it take as long as it takes without rushing it. It is harder to integrate a single bird into an existing flock, since it has no buddies to hang out with.
 

JedJackson

Crossing the Road
5 Years
Jul 6, 2016
7,745
23,264
962
NW Washington state
2 is a bit more developed, but it's probably just growing a bit faster. The comb looks relatively small and pale, and the coloring is pretty even and typlical for a female EE. The legs are a little thick, but not enough to say it is a cockerel. I think it is a pullet.

Watch the comb over the next 3 weeks or so. If it grows rapidly and gets red, then you may have a cockerel.
 

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