3 females & 1 male, 1 or all is sterile!

Albanydog

Songster
10 Years
Nov 22, 2009
162
12
151
Central Oregon Coast
Mom has 4 Pearl Gray colored, Helmeted Guinea Fowl, that she bought three years ago from the feed store. Three turned out to be females and one is a male. He has a favorite female he breeds often that is for sure, but none of the eggs are fertile. We assume it is the male that is infertile, it just seems more likely then it being all three females. We have tried to hatch the eggs a dozen times and the guinea hens, as well as a few chicken hens, have sat on the guinea eggs many times and they absolutely never do anything, they do not even start to grow at all, so we are positive there is an infertility issue. We are kind of wondering if it is the male, and how we would find that out, and if it is just a fluke to have a sterile Male, or is this something that happens a lot from maybe bad breeding practices at the hatchery or maybe it is all of them that are sterile, since they could have come from the same hatchery and even the same hen for all that we know?

Anyone have experience introducing a new male into the flock of established Guineas? Mom would like to have them hatch some keets/chicks, which would require she get another male somewhere. We are wondering what will happen if she gets another male, will there be a simple pecking order picking on the new guy period of time, a few fights between the two males to establish dominance or would they fight to the death? Thanks for the info

PS Mom lives near Newport Oregon, if anyone knows where she can get another male!
 

R2elk

Free Ranger
Premium member
6 Years
Feb 24, 2013
12,103
38,308
1,131
Natrona County, Wyoming
Mom has 4 Pearl Gray colored, Helmeted Guinea Fowl, that she bought three years ago from the feed store. Three turned out to be females and one is a male. He has a favorite female he breeds often that is for sure, but none of the eggs are fertile. We assume it is the male that is infertile, it just seems more likely then it being all three females. We have tried to hatch the eggs a dozen times and the guinea hens, as well as a few chicken hens, have sat on the guinea eggs many times and they absolutely never do anything, they do not even start to grow at all, so we are positive there is an infertility issue. We are kind of wondering if it is the male, and how we would find that out, and if it is just a fluke to have a sterile Male, or is this something that happens a lot from maybe bad breeding practices at the hatchery or maybe it is all of them that are sterile, since they could have come from the same hatchery and even the same hen for all that we know?

Anyone have experience introducing a new male into the flock of established Guineas? Mom would like to have them hatch some keets/chicks, which would require she get another male somewhere. We are wondering what will happen if she gets another male, will there be a simple pecking order picking on the new guy period of time, a few fights between the two males to establish dominance or would they fight to the death? Thanks for the info

PS Mom lives near Newport Oregon, if anyone knows where she can get another male!
Since you feel sure that the current male is infertile, I would bring in two new males and remove the infertile male. I understand that people don't want to get rid of their pets but if you want fertile eggs, it is best to remove the current cock and thus there will be fewer problems introducing new males.
 

justin shrew

Chirping
6 Years
Nov 19, 2013
95
24
96
cape town,South africa
My Coop
My Coop
are your guineas cooped all along? do they free range? how old are they now?
infertility can be caused by many reasons. guineas that are cooped has a low fertility rate than guineas that roam free.
1. hens can sometimes lay infertile eggs, if they don't get enough nutrition which might cause the ovulation process or ovum development downwards. this happens when the is a low level of calcium, which may lead to eggs with no shells or oviduct strut. same applies to a male guinea wich usaully happens when the testeosteron hormone is at rest, which may goes inversely propotional with females oestrogen hormone. (females being ready to breed while may are not)

it may take time for new male to get to know the old flock,since they are adults. and of cause the is always a fight...

best wishes
 
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