3 questions about stock dogs

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by dinahmoe, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. dinahmoe

    dinahmoe Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    central georgia
    Dogs
    i really should have done 3 post but trying to keep it simple.

    1.dog breed for very hot Georgia summers
    my neighbor has a GP and has done fine but she looks so misarable during the summer(but so do I).
    are there african type stock dogs-just thinking its hot there.

    2.tips on keeping 1 dog with several different pastures and livestock.all pastures and livestock are inside 70acres with page wire.


    3.has anyone ever used a ridgeback as stock dog?
    i had one who i rescued from research.she was content to be a couch potatoe,although she loved to run.just wonderinf if their prey drive too strong.

    i know each dog is different.i have 2 blue heelers who will not bother my chickens.they actually free range with the dogs. so i lucked out there.i really want a ridgeback or catahoula but i don't know it i will have the same luck with them as my heelers.i have had both breeds but not with livestock.

    even tho i have the heelers,they will not "protect" the animls like i want.they bark and then its my job to do the rest.that doesn't work when i am not here.

    thanks
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2011
  2. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    I assume you are talking about Livestock guardian dogs right? Look at Anatolian Shepherds. Their coat is much shorter and they can easily withstand your climate, if they have some shade in the summer. They are used a lot in Texas because of their short coat (I have two of them and live in South Carolina). Rodesian Ridgebacks are hunting dogs, with a strong prey drive. They also have such a short coat I don't think they'd do well as LDGs in the winter. I know it's a breed you'd like, but if you are looking for a dog to bond with stock and protect them, you are far better off getting a breed that was developed for that purpose. One dog may not be enough for 70 acres......plan on two of them. Many people have low gates or openings under fences to allow the dogs to move from one pasture to the other.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2011
  3. dinahmoe

    dinahmoe Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    yes,livestock guardian dogs.
    how are your shepards personalities?
    the low gates are a good idea.i'll try to find some pictures-i am a visual person.
    thanks for the info
     
  4. aubreynoramarie

    aubreynoramarie designated lawn flamingo

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    would you be able to shave a GP in the summer if you had one? Sometimes that can be really pricy but its an option!
     
  5. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    Quote:Tractor supply sells a farm gate that has 2x4 welded wire in the bottom section and an open area above it. A dog could easily learn to jump through that opening and go to other pastures. Put a strand of hot wire across openings that you don't want dogs going through.

    The personality of Anatolian Shepherd is much like any other livestock guardian breed. They bark less than Great Pyranees do because their guarding style is different. GPs bark to let potential predators know they are on duty and to stay away, where Anatolians bark if they see or hear something that needs to be barked at. Mine are doing great in this regard. They are 6 months old and bark at night if they hear something, but don't keep up barking for hours. they alert me, then quiet down. They are said to be a little more stand-offish of strangers than GPs are but are great with their own family members and with children. They spend a lot of time sleeping in the sun during the day and are more alert at night. Mine never go in their dog houses....they prefer to sleep out in the middle of the pasture no matter what the weather is. My pups have very different personalities. One is more watchful and reserved, the other is very outgoing and affectionate. The breeder knew this when she selected them for me and I was very happy to have the two different personalities since one dog is to be a full time guardian and part time show dog and the other will be more of a home guardian and my walking companion....and possible therapy dog.

    http://www.anatoliandog.org/index.html

    http://www.asdca.org/
     
  6. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    Quote:Shaving a double coated dog actually makes him more sensitive to temperature extremes than leaving his coat intact. Sometimes shaving the belly area is a good idea though. It's actually just better to get a dog that is more suitable for the climate in which he will be living.
     
  7. aubreynoramarie

    aubreynoramarie designated lawn flamingo

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    Quote:Shaving a double coated dog actually makes him more sensitive to temperature extremes than leaving his coat intact. Sometimes shaving the belly area is a good idea though. It's actually just better to get a dog that is more suitable for the climate in which he will be living.

    didnt know that, thanks!
     
  8. la dee da

    la dee da Chillin' With My Peeps

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  9. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    Quote:That's an interesting breed. Probably not one that you could even locate in this country if you tried though. And like you said....probably not one that could handle winters here.
     
  10. dinahmoe

    dinahmoe Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Quote:wow very neat looking dog.i would just have to have a fat dog because there is no way i could have them look like that.lol

    i wonder what cold temps it could with stand?
     

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