4.5 Week Old White Leghorn - Pullet or Rooster?

aank4

In the Brooder
10 Years
Feb 22, 2009
46
4
34
This is our first set of chicks, supposedly all pullets. I'm highly suspicious of our white leghorn, though. "She" has a bigger comb than the rest, in particular, and she's been growing the fastest. I wonder if it's just because white leghorns are bred to grow quickly and produce right away? It's possible that my other girls' breeds have smaller combs at this age (4.5 weeks), too - not sure.

Anyway, here are pics, your opinions are much appreciated!


 

lilchick

Songster
11 Years
May 23, 2008
1,289
24
161
Williamsport In.
I know the leghorn hens have much larger combs than other breeds.. I would watch the wattles as an indication too because they start developing early on roos.

edited to say that if I was a betting person I would say it is a ROO...
 
Last edited:

miss_jayne

Lady_Jayne
11 Years
Jun 26, 2008
9,089
12
271
Columbiaville, MI
i am actually thinking cockerel. there is some pink to the comb and spur bumps.

my white leghorn pullets are 9 weeks old and their combs are much smaller than this.

no matter what, it's a cute chicken!
 

Justino

♪♫ Rockin' Rooster ♪♫
12 Years
Dec 21, 2007
5,110
37
281
KY
im gonna say boy on this one...he/she looks just like my old sunny.........
 

Mahonri

Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
May 14, 2008
30,365
273
466
North Phoenix
My Coop
No doubt.

Cockeral!

I got 3 of the 5 that hatched that are 4 weeks old and they too are roos!
 

aank4

In the Brooder
10 Years
Feb 22, 2009
46
4
34
I found this picture of a four week old white leghorn cockerel from another thread on the topic:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2564765860/in/set-72157605397346559/
Is that level of redness typical for a cockerel?
If ours is indeed a roo, that's a major bummer for us, as our town only allows four hens, and we'll have to relocate or butcher him and probably would have a tough time finding another hen to add to the flock. I also really, really wanted some white eggs for folk art purposes, and this is our only white-egg bird.
I tried my hand at wing-sexing when she/he was a new hatchling - and it appeared that there were the two staggered rows of primary feathers as would be typical for a girl. Then again, I'm new to this.
Of course, if we ever find a white egg, we'll know for sure.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom