4 new flock members, battery hens from California egg laying operation

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by SidsMom, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. SidsMom

    SidsMom Out Of The Brooder

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    We just picked up 4 new flock members adopted from Animal Place sanctuary's July 29 rescue of 3000 hens from a california egg laying farmer. They are currently under quarantine in my Avairy. All 4 have been debeaked and they are all different so there clearly is no art to this practice. We gave the a much needed bath and they enjoyed the 80 degree Fahrenheit sunny California October weather as they dried off. I'm assuming their poor grooming is a combination of beak mutilation and the filthy over crowed conditions they have live in prior to rescue. In the time they spent at Animal Place they learned to roost well and forage and dust bath like normal chickens. I'm feeding homemade rations and meal worms which they have really taken too well. They don't recognize fresh veggies and fruit as food yet but might follow the example once merged in with the rest of my flock. I'm am very impressed with the level of rehab that they received prior to our adopting them. How they managed to trim nails on 3000+ chickens defys me but all 4 have trimmed nails which were clearly horribly overgrown from living in wire bottom cages. We are looking forward to integrating them with our hand raised flock in the coming weeks. I'll post photos soon and you will all be quite surprised how great they look considering what life was like prior to July 29th. This will be our first experience with white leghorns. Today was their first full day here and they have already laid two jumbos even with the trauma of a bath.
    Here is more information one where our new girls came from.
    http://animalplace.org/helping-hens-rescue
     
  2. chicken pickin

    chicken pickin Overrun With Chickens

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    Sounds like your hens are doing wonderful. What a wonderful thing adopting ex battery hens. Good luck integrating them in with your original flock.
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Pics?
     
  4. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Congratulations on your new girls! Thanks for rescuing them. Will be following your thread to see how they do.
     
  5. SidsMom

    SidsMom Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]

    Here are our new girls in their temporary quarters. You can see how messed up their beaks are. But the two months at Animal Place really made huge strides. I was very surprised how great they are looking already. This is day 2 at our house.

    Linda
     
  6. chicken pickin

    chicken pickin Overrun With Chickens

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    AW their poor beaks, so sad. They look great though.
     
  7. SidsMom

    SidsMom Out Of The Brooder

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    Roosting like a professional. They seems to have no idea that they were ever confine to a small little cage.
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Of course they don't, they don't 'think' like humans do.
     
  9. SidsMom

    SidsMom Out Of The Brooder

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    No they do not grow back. We have one that the lower beak did but at this point the damage is not going to correct itself. They actually burn the beak to prevent regrowth.
     
  10. res

    res Chillin' With My Peeps

    When we lived in Oklahoma, we purchased 13 hens that had been commercial layers. All were red stars, and all had their beaks cut completely off just below the nostrils. Like yours, the cuts were not symmetrically, and the birds all had different looking beaks. They did great with us as long as we feed crumbles and kept them deep in the feeder. They were unable to pick up scratch grains, pellets, or anything small. They free ranged, and did occasionally grab a bug or two, but it took them many tries to do so.

    My suggestion is to watch your new hens weight, and if they seem to be dropping weight, then you might need to change your feeding practices/types of feed to allow them to eat better.
     

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