4 out of 24 -- any chance for the others if no pip

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by JBarringerNC, Dec 5, 2012.

  1. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Its obvious that my homemade incubator's temps were running a little low at some point..
    Today is 22 days with 4 chicks finally out and healthy... all though there's no sign of pips from the other 20 eggs.

    I've had these in lockdown with 65-75% humidity for almost 4 days now. but since my temps ran a few degrees low should I give these eggs a few more days before chucking them out?

    -The 1st chick took almost 20 hrs from pip, zip and finally out! 2nd chick was SPEEDY with pip, zip and shell kicked off in less than 30 mins. It was amazing.
    The other 2 were ready to come on out once they heard the chirping from the 1st one.


    I've got 3 of the 4 in a brooder now, I left 1 in the incubator for inspiration to the remaining eggs to start pip of their eggs.. Is that non-sense, or is it actually true that if they hear it chirping they'll come out sooner?
     
  2. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    I would leave them, if you know your temps were running. Good Luck
     
  3. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh yeah [​IMG]to BYC
     
  4. Jungleexplorer

    Jungleexplorer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A few degrees lower temperature will slow development, so you could still get a lot more chicks. Even with proper temps I have had chicks hatch as late as day 23. With low temps you could be getting chicks as late as day 24 or 25. Hold tight and be patient.

    Two questions. How much humidity did you run for the first 18 days and how do the first four chicks look? Are they sticky?
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  5. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ok,
    Will do!

    I'm certainly new to the homemade incubator scene, since its longer than 21 days i'm getting some good notes on what to change for next time.


    ** Does the chick I left in the bator give any inspiration to the others that are on the verge of pip stage?
     
  6. 20736

    20736 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am wondering what is the source of your eggs? Were they shipped? Are they farm fresh?
    The reason is, shipped eggs do far worse than fresh eggs - you can read the posts on here to confirm.
    In any case, a cool hatch takes longer. My last hatch was right on for temp and it still was 48 hours between first and last to hatch.
    So, keep it locked down and watch for good signs. Good Luck.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  7. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Farm fresh.
    I bought 2 dozen from a lady here in Charlotte NC.

    Paid $3/dozen..
    I gave her a $10 and told her to keep the change,, I was so happy to be getting fertile eggs after looking forever that I was glad to pay $4 extra. [​IMG]

    But, I did not candle the eggs.. I didn't know what that was before I put them in the incubator.
    After doing more research as the days went forward I found that it's the only way to be sure if the eggs were even viable for hatching!

    (I guess i'll wait another 2-3 days and throw the rest out If they're not showing signs of hatching.)
     
  8. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    I had a bit of fluctuating humidity, but it stayed between 30 and 45 % for the 17 days .. on the 18th day (lock down went to 60%+)
    Today I noticed that it was at 80% but I quickly opened it up a bit to reduce to 70% and its staying there most of the day.

    How high can the humidity get during lockdown (before its too high)?
     
  9. Becci

    Becci Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some of my eggs (especially the bantams, it seems) hatch within a few hours after pipping. Then, there's others who take 30-40 hours to hatch after pipping. I guess some chicks just have more energy than others. I've heard numerous people even recommend putting a radio by the incubator, whether or not that actually encourages them to hatch - I don't know. I do think that hearing other chicks chirp encourages the unhatched babies, but the chicks go as fast as they can, they want out pretty bad - I don't believe it makes them hatch any sooner. It's interesting to me, to listen to what sounds like conversations between the hatched and the unhatched chicks. [​IMG]

    Personally I would wait another 24 hours then candle all of the remaining eggs. Maybe even do a float test. If the eggs are viable, shove them back in the incubator and wait. If not - chunk them. It sounds as though the temperatures were pretty close to what they should have been. Hatching on day 22 is completely normal.

    Oh, and welcome to BYC.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  10. Jungleexplorer

    Jungleexplorer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Humidity is a tricky thing. What most people do not realize is that the eggs themselves are giving off moisture and adding to the humidity in the bator. In a small incubator like the Hovabator Genesis, you do not need to add any humidity at all for the first 18 days "IF" you have it full of eggs, because the eggs themselves will give off all the moisture needed. But if you just had a few eggs in the bator, you would need to add some humidity. It is better to have too little humidity then too much.

    If the first four chicks that hatched looked kind of wet and sticky, then you might have had too much humidity. Too much humidity can kill a lot of chicks when they try to pip because there will be water in the air cell that can drown the chick when it begins to pip. Some chicks that hatch will be covered in glue that will kill them (sticky chick). There is a way to save sticky chicks if you get some.

    At this point there is nothing you can do to change the outcome of this batch. If all you get out of this batch is 4 chicks, I would say you did very good for your first time with a home built bator. Congrats! Incubating eggs is not as easy as it seems. There are a lot of variables to be considered in each situation. The best thing is to keep trying and learning what works for you in your area.

    Just remember, there is no perfect way to do this, there are some basic rules, but it boils down to what works for you. Enjoy your new chicks and come back here for advice if you run into trouble. There are lot's of really nice people here that want to help you.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012

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