40% of our eggs have blood spots - What can I do?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by FoxRiverRat, Mar 8, 2017.

  1. FoxRiverRat

    FoxRiverRat Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2016
    hi all!

    1st time chicken owner, got ours in April (5 cinnamon queens). They lay a lot, but I'd ball park that 30-40% of the eggs have the red blood spot / meat spot in them. I know they are still edible, but I never though soooo many of them would have this. it does sort of gross me out, and people I've given eggs too have mentioned it. At some point I may want to expand operations and sell some eggs to the many people who ask me if I have some for sale, but I feel like all the blood spots would freak them out.

    So.... am I doing something wrong to get that many eggs with blood spots? My chicks eat organic/non-gmo feed, I supply extra grit and extra calcium. I though maybe too much calcium could be a problem...

    any thoughts/ solutions to reduce the blood spot frequency would be awesome.

    Thanks!
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    A lot of times blood spots are seen in eggs from flighty birds that fly about bashing themselves which causes ruptured blood vessels in the reproductive tract. I have seen less this year because my birds are more mature and calmer.

    It helps to not frighten them and to have enough distance for them to get off the roost without bashing into walls flying down. Keeping roosts lower than 3-4 feet high can help too.
     
  3. FoxRiverRat

    FoxRiverRat Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2016
    Thanks for the advise! Their roost is very low to the ground though, so I don't think that is it in my case, but I do have a dog that will try to get a rise out of them occasionally so that might be a factor.
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Dog chasing them or running towards them could cause it. I would try to lessen the dogs interactions to see if it improves. Sometimes it's a genetic thing, but usually it's from outside factors.
     
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  5. FoxRiverRat

    FoxRiverRat Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2016
    cool! luckily the the newness of the chickens is wearing off so our dogs interest level is definitely declining fast
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I think blood spots are more common in high production type breeds.
    It could be you got a batch that is genetically more disposed to them....
    ...or it may be that just a couple of your birds are producing them.
     
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  7. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    This is worth an experiment: try giving them some vitamins. I put my birds on vitamins several months ago. I noticed an immediate correlation between their egg shell quality, membrane thickness, albumen and yolk quality, decrease in blood spots. Overall, the entire egg structure is improved. Some eggs, I swear, I need to keep a chisel beside my stove so I can get those shells open for my daily breakfast! Poultry nutri-drench is an excellent product. There are others on the market as well. I am also an advocate of fermented feed, and that is where I put my vitamins. PM to follow.
     

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