5 week old roo injured by grown hen first night in outdoor pen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DebiSmith, May 9, 2011.

  1. DebiSmith

    DebiSmith Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2011
    We found him huddled in a corner bleeding yesterday morning along with a grown hen who had pushed open a trap door to get to his area. Upon inspection it looks like all the feathers and skin were yanked out of his neck and he has a puncture wound at the base of the back of his neck. We did nail the trap door shut between the chicks' pen and the grownups coop to prevent further attacks (the babies were received from a hatchery at one day old April 5 so they don't have a mother hen) and brought little Splash into the house for care. We did rinse his neck with peroxide and applied Neosporin generously and put him in a clean pen with food, water and the red heat lamp. He actually seems happy, he's hopping on top of his feeder, eating and drinking and we did not put any other babies in with him, thinking the company would not be useful if he got pecked further on his injuries. We are new to this and would appreciate any advice that would increase his chances for recovery. We've had chickens lose feathers due to roo love and they grew back, but do you think his skin will grow back?
     
  2. patman75

    patman75 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I use "blue Kote" for wounds. It keeps the other chickens for pecking at the wound. You can get it online or farm stores.
     
  3. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    My Coop
    Chickens can heal from some really bad injuries, so keep putting on the neosporin (hopefully you have the type without the pain relief) and monitor him for any signs of infection. Keep him separated for a while. I have used blu kote too.
     
  4. DebiSmith

    DebiSmith Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2011
    Thanks Patman! BYC is truly a Godsend. I'll let you all know how Splash is doing later on.
     
  5. ginafl

    ginafl New Egg

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    Poor little baby, I don't know why hens are so darn mean to babies that do not belong to them. Sounds like you are taking perfect care of him:)
     
  6. DebiSmith

    DebiSmith Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi all, Splash is hanging in there. His wounds have been healing, no more bleeding or evidence of the open puncture wound, nicely Blue Koted and we moved him to a larger coop still in our kitchen. However now he seems to have a sore throat and/or indigestion. Seems very uncomfortable swallowing, his beak gets bubbly and other people have seen him urp up his feed and water. He does not seem to be thriving but only surviving. I learned from reading Celtic Druid's advice to Chido re: Rusty that he probably needs grit but will that hurt his throat if it's sore? He took some very sweet cherry kool-aid but seemed to work pretty hard to swallow it, neck twisting side to side and up and down. Also he seems cool compared to a few weeks ago when I hold him. His red heat lamp was changed to a UV gro-lite and he mostly huddles under it, chirping some. Should I put the red lamp back on him? I will meantime get parakeet grit and offer him some yogurt and soft wet treats like melon. Any advice is appreciated! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2011
  7. Chido

    Chido Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What I've been doing with Rusty is feed him(?) some boiled egg yolk. i just hold him and offer him tiny pieces. Also if you have a syringe, you can give your chick some water with it. The way I do it so I don't accidentaly send liquids to rusty's lungs is to press the tip of the syringe gently on the side of his beak, and when I see him open his mouth, I squeeze the syringe gently to make some of the water spill into his beak. I asked if i could give him a bit of organic apple juice we have at home, I was given the ok, and since Rusty won't touch yougrt if i put it on a dish, I mixed the yogurt with enough juice to make it easy for rusty to drink it. Just b prepared to end with a third of the mix on you XD.

    Also I'd wait on the grit for bit. If the chick's throat is still in pain, eating grit might bother it. Rusty has been eating a bit of rice cake crumbles, and while thy are softer than his regular food, I see it still bothers him to eat solids, so I'd stick to soft food for now, and from what I understand, chicks don't need grit for soft food. I hope I'm not wrong on that one though [​IMG].
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2011
  8. DebiSmith

    DebiSmith Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks! I will hold off on the grit for now. We did go ahead and put the red brooding lamp back in his coop for increased warmth and put more Neosporin over the blue kote, which he only had one dose of and it seems to have dried out his "skin" (not sure what there is left of that, but it (the surface of his neck)definitely is tougher& drier than on the day of his injury. But maybe we overdid the BK. We hope the Neo will soften his skin and make him more comfortable. The problem seems to be that what he does take in doesn't stay down or else it does not seem to go all the way down. Would a normal 6-week old's crop feel full after feeding? His does not seem to, we feel breast bone only. Right now he's being cuddled in a towel in an attempt to warm him some.[​IMG]
     

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