6 Hens, 0 -1 eggs per day, does that seem right?

Bumpa

In the Brooder
Sep 1, 2016
9
4
27
We've got two Rhode Island Reds, two Americanas, and two buff orpingtons. Three chicks are about 3 years old, 3 are about two years old. Since about September we've only been averaging one egg a day. We live in north Texas, so it doesn't get that cold. Could be shorter daylight or molt, not sure. They free range in the yard most day's, but we have penned them up to be sure nothing was stealing them. Have not seen any evidence of them eating their eggs.
Any thoughts?
Thanks,
Bill
 

ashlierami

Songster
Feb 9, 2017
871
1,552
232
Alabama
We've got two Rhode Island Reds, two Americanas, and two buff orpingtons. Three chicks are about 3 years old, 3 are about two years old. Since about September we've only been averaging one egg a day. We live in north Texas, so it doesn't get that cold. Could be shorter daylight or molt, not sure. They free range in the yard most day's, but we have penned them up to be sure nothing was stealing them. Have not seen any evidence of them eating their eggs.
Any thoughts?
Thanks,
Bill
If they are in molt I would say this is the issue. My girls lay 3 times a week when it's a good week. They are in molt currently and aren't laying at all. Also the shorter days and we have had a lot of rainy cloudy days where they don't go outside as much. I live in Alabama it has been cold but nothing below freezing.
 

Kat2141

Songster
Jul 25, 2018
281
653
182
Windsor, NY
from what I understand, they may start slowing down production around 3 years old. But it could be also the shorter days, or if they are molting... some people add extra lighting to lengthen the days. I know mine (1.5+ year old) are not laying quite as regular as they did last winter, but I don't keep extra lights on for them either. (their first year they were egg-laying machines - short days didn't matter then LOL)
 

Bumpa

In the Brooder
Sep 1, 2016
9
4
27
Thanks for your thoughts on the subject. It's kinda what I thought from reading other posts. Everyone has their own unique situation, yet a bird is still a bird, and nature still applies.
 

Debby in france

Chirping
Dec 8, 2018
75
202
86
We've got two Rhode Island Reds, two Americanas, and two buff orpingtons. Three chicks are about 3 years old, 3 are about two years old. Since about September we've only been averaging one egg a day. We live in north Texas, so it doesn't get that cold. Could be shorter daylight or molt, not sure. They free range in the yard most day's, but we have penned them up to be sure nothing was stealing them. Have not seen any evidence of them eating their eggs.
Any thoughts?
Thanks,
Bill
Hi, I would agree with the others. Moulting is a highly draining thing for them. Try giving them broken walnuts, tuna (rinse to remove salt if using tinned in brine) or even peas to help recoup the vitamins (also try oats, liver, sunflower seeds, yogurt or mackerel) they use mostly while moulting. If you have one that is having a fast moult I would recommend Poultry Nutri Drops by nettex. They saved my Susan this year when she decided to moult nearly all her feathers in August in two weeks. Poor love was really weak. Good luck.
 

Bumpa

In the Brooder
Sep 1, 2016
9
4
27
Thanks for the tip on the extra nutrition. Never heard of that. I do feed them high protein feed in the winter.
 

Debby in france

Chirping
Dec 8, 2018
75
202
86
The Nutri drops are an essential in my girls first aid box. I don’t know what’s in it, and I am not sure I really want to know, but within 20 minutes the girl that has been treated is visibly better. It doesn’t last though so needs to be treated for three or five days. No more. After that if she declines again I leave it a week and retreat. Brilliant stuff for fast moulds, stress and shock.
 

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