6 month old Ameraucanas

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Kknight3, Aug 19, 2014.

  1. Kknight3

    Kknight3 Out Of The Brooder

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    My ameraucanas have just started laying. I am only getting 1 egg a day so I assume that it is just one hen doing the laying. The problem is that she will not sit on the eggs. What does this mean? I want to hatch more chicks.
     
  2. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    WELCOME TO BYC!!!

    The only way to hatch chicks with a hen is if the hen goes broody. Otherwise you'll have to hatch and raise them yourself.
     
  3. MrsBrooke

    MrsBrooke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Since you want chicks, I will assume you have a rooster. No rooster, no babies!

    A chicken that is in the mood to be a mother will get broody and sit on her clutch (and the clutches of other hens), whether they are fertilized eggs or golf balls.

    There's no way of knowing whether you have a broody type unless you got them from a breeder that was well-acquainted with his chickens and their personalities used for his breeding program.

    If you got them from a hatchery, it's a crap shoot.

    I do know that there is a difference between regular poop and broody poop, though. A quick Google should yield results.

    You can't force a hen to go broody either. She either will or she won't. Some hens get broody multiple times each year, some never do. It all depends on her wiring.

    Be patient and let nature take its course. :)

    But if patience isn't your thing, you can always purchase more chicks from a hatchery or a breeder.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Hi and welcome. Production and incubation of eggs are two different matters - a hen can produce eggs(lay) for her entire life and never go broody (decide to incubate and hatch the eggs). Some breeds are more prone to broody nature than others and within those same breeds you will have the exception or the rule in individual birds who buck the system and either do/don't ever give into broody inclinations. You cannot "make" your bird choose to set a clutch of eggs.
    Also, to ask the obvious question, do you currently have a rooster with your new laying birds? That will be another key component in successfully hatching chicks.
    If you do, indeed, have a male bird available who is mating your females and you wish to hatch your fertile eggs you will either have to wait for one of your birds to "go broody" on you - or you will need to use an incubator and hatch the eggs yourself.
     
  5. Kknight3

    Kknight3 Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes I do have a rooster. This is my first experience raising my own chickens so I do not know a whole lot about it yet. I have an incubator that I have put some of the eggs in. I have done some research so I am hoping Im doing it right. I have tried candling a few of the eggs but I really dont know what to look for. A few of them did not get put in until 3 days after they were layed. Will those still hatch? Some of the eggs have been in the incubator since the 7th. I should be able to see something right?
     
  6. MrsBrooke

    MrsBrooke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is a really good video for information on candling eggs. The guy has more videos on his channel, so you can check those out, too.

    If there is an embryo developing, you'll see a small shadowy dot and veins beginning to spread inside the shell (http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/avian/images/Img0011L.jpg). I've heard the lighter blue shell of the Ameraucana egg can make it difficult to see an embryo as the pigment is deeper in the shell. You'll also notice the air pocket starting to grow larger at the fat end of the egg.

    Here is what you might see around day 14. http://cdn.backyardchickens.com/2/2d/2d360fa8_230_another_whiting_small_600.jpeg

    I do know you don't want to candle too often, as the eggs needs to stay at a pretty stable temperature.

    If the eggs were left to their own devices and got below a certain temperature, they may not hatch. I have heard of stranger things happening, though.

    I'll be looking forward to see if any of your eggs turn into little chickens!
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2014

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